Tedford's Lumber Ipswich MA

10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (1933)

The complex that is now Tedford’s Lumber on Brown Square was part of the S. F. Canney Box Factory and Woodworking Shop and is believed to have been built after the fire that destroyed Canney Lumber and the Burke Heel Factory in June of 1933.

Tedford’s Lumber got its start in 1946 when James Tedford Sr. and Bill Martin, just back from the Navy, took a portable sawmill into the woods along Linebrook and Topsfield Roads to cut timber. That winter was very tough, and the next year they decided to open a lumber yard on Brown Square, which been in business for almost 70 year, now continuing operations with new owners.

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The rear of Tedford’s Lumber shows a door that once opened to the railroad cars behind it.
The tracks behind The grain building that is now part of Tedford’s Lumber

The old Wirthmore Feeds grain elevator at Telford’s Lumber had a long history of use by several businesses for grain storage including Wirthmore Feeds, William G. Horton, C.M. Jewett @ Co., and Chaplain’s Grain Storage. It was moved from its original location near the Town Wharf and the top section was added at the new location at Brown Square. It also survived the Burke Heel Factory fire in June of 1933.

The old Wirthmore Feeds grain elevator at Tedfords Lumber, which is where they vertically store finish lumber. The building had a long history of use by several businesses for grain storage including Wirthmore Feeds, William G. Horton, C.M. Jewett @ Co., and Chaplain’s Grain Storage. It was moved from its original location near the Town Wharf and the top section was added at the new location at Brown Square. It also survived a monstrous fire that destroyed Canney Lumber and the Burke Heel Factory fire in June of 1933.
C.M. Jewett and Co preceded William G. Horton in using this building as a grain silo. A chute on the back of the building loaded grain directly from railroad cars seen in the background on the left.

Tedford and Martin Lumber

Tedford and Martin opened their lumberyard on Brown Square in 1947

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