Sanford Peatfield House, 18 Washington St. This house appears to have been built for Sanford and Mary Peatfield around 1860. The Peatfield family came from England in 1827. His brother James was responsible for inventing a warp machine, after which he began manufacturing woolen underwear. He is considered one of the first in the country to do this. Sanford and James Peatfield built a brick mill on Washington Street (approximately where Hammett Street now intersects Washington) and continued making woolen underwear until about 1877. Sanford Peatfield died by 1884 and his wife continued to occupy this house. By 1910 it was owned by B. Kaufman who operated a scrap iron yard at the back of the lot.

James and Sanford Peatfield

In a building erected by the Heards at the “Lower Mills,” James Peatfield and his brother Sanford were engaged in knitting shirts and drawers upon a rotary warp frame, invented by James as early as the year 1834. The woolen mill was on the northwest side of the County Street bridge.

Encouraged by their success, the Peatfield brothers bought the land in 1840, and proceeded to build the brick factory, known later as the “Hayes Tavern.” It was equipped with machinery invented by James, and began at once a prosperous business in the production of underwear. Mr. Geo. W. Heard was the warm friend of the enterprise and advanced money for the new manufacturer. But the business had been established only a few years, when Mr. Heard was obliged to go into bankruptcy and the Peatfields were hopelessly involved.

The Hayes Hotel at the corner of Depot Square and Hammatt Street.

 

The Peatfield brothers portrayed at the Riverwalk Mural by Alan Pearsall, 2006

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