The abrupt change in the name of High Street to East Street at the intersection with North Street is odd unless one knows a bit of history. When Ipswich was laid out in the 1600’s, town center was Meetinghouse Green.  A road headed south and crossed the river — it was named South Main Street.  It continued north from the Green one block as North Main Street and ended.  From here one could go west on High Street, or East and down to the river on East Street.

East Street, 1870
East Street, 1909

Although still unpaved thirty years later, the street already looks more elegant.

East Street along the Ipswich River before the current Town Wharf was created in the early 20th Century. At that time the river came to the edge of the street.
The Hodgkins Lakeman house on East St.
The Hodgkins Lakeman house on East St. Photo by George Darling, circa 1900
East and Hovey Street intersection by George Dexter
East and Hovey Street intersection by George Dexter
The intersection of East and Spring Streets, with a Hayward Scale in the intersection, before 1900. Photo by George Dexter
The intersection of East and Spring Streets, with a Hayward Scale in the intersection, before 1900. Photo by George Dexter
10 East Street, the Nathaniel Harris house (1819) - Nathaniel Harris built his home in 1819 on a section of land from the Baker Newman property next door. His widow Elizabeth Staniford lived into her 90's. The county laid a pipe connecting a spring on this land to the house of corrections on Meetinghouse Green.
13 East St., Ipswich MA 13 East St. (tentative: Ignatius Dodge – F. Lord house, 1856) - On the 1856 map this appears to be the "Ignatius Dodge Shoe Shop." The 1910 Ipswich map shows #13 East Street is owned by "F. Lord."
Baker Newman house, East St. Ipswich MA 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725) - John Baker was granted a section of the land extending down East Street to Spring Street, originally granted to Rev. Cobbet. John Baker Jr. sold eight acres with buildings including land on the hillside to Nathaniel Jones Jr. in 1742. Jones sold the house and lot to George Newman Jr., a weaver.
15 East Street, Ipswich MA 15 East Street: Dawson’s Bakery; James and Louise Glover house (c 1870) - The house at #15 East Street may have been a small shop before it was converted to residences. The 1872 map shows the building at this location as “Dawson Bakery.”
16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840) - This house was built between 1837 and 1846 when mariner Richard Lakeman sold the land “with the dwelling house and other buildings thereon,” to his brother, Captain Ebenezer “Eben” Lakeman. The house has an Asher Benjamin doorway and has a preservation agreement with Historic New England.
18 East Street, the Baker-Dodge house (1727) - This house was built c 1727 by John Baker III, and purchased by Mary Dennis Dodge in 1818. The house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the town of Ipswich.
2 East Street, the Robert Jordan house (1863) - The first Methodist Church meeting house was on East Street at the present day location of the Ipswich Inn. The house next door was the parsonage, still standing. Robert Jordan, a clothing merchant, bought this lot in 1862, and built the fine Italianate home. Dr. George C. Bailey was the next owner.
G. Russell house, 21 East St., Ipswich MA 21 East Street, the George Russell house (c 1870) - The first owner of this house is tentatively identified as George Russell, 1823-1884. Occupation: Mason. His parents were Daniel Russell and Mary Lakeman.
22 East Street, Ipswich MA the Moses Fellows house 22 East Street, the Moses Fellows House (1873) - Thomas Sweet sold this lot to Moses A. Fellows and Sarah G. Hodgkins in 1873, and Fellows built the\is Italianate house shortly thereafter. Fellows owned a lumber yard on Water Street.
25 East St., Ipswich MA the Stanwood-Willcomb house 25 East St, the Stanwood-Willcomb house (1830) - Stephen Stanwood erected this house in 1830 for a fulling mill. Sheep grazed on the bare hills above East and High Streets, and the mill used water that ran from the springs. This is said to be the first house in town to have running water. Fred Willcomb and his brother Lewis E. Willcomb operated a store here at Willcomb's Corner.
26 East Street, the Staniford – Polly Dole -John Updike house (1687-1720) - Some part of this house may have been constructed in 1687 for Deacon John Staniford and his wife Margaret, but acquired its current form in 1720. This was the home of writer John Updike, and has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
27 East St., Ipswich MA 27 East Street, the Widow Elizabeth Caldwell house (1740-1755) - Joseph Wait sold this lot to Elizabeth Caldwell, widow of Thomas, in 1829. She moved a house from another site onto her property. The rear two story wing is believed to be the older house, joined together when the house was moved. Structural evidence suggest a construction dates of about 1740 to 1775 for the two sections.
3 East St., Ipswich MA the J. W. Perkins house 3 East Street, the James W. Perkins house and Provisions (1860) - This house was built between 1856 and 1872. Samuel Hunt purchased the ancient Day-Dodge house at the corner of North Main and East Streets on Feb. 14, 1849 with three lots adjoining. The 1856 Ipswich map shows Burroughs Machine Shop at this location. The 1896 Ipswich Business Directory lists J.W. Perkins, Provisions and Meat Market at this location on East Street.
30 East Street, the Jordan – Snelling – Potter house (c 1708) - John Potter purchased the lot in 1708 with all the buildings, including the “old house, new out-houses, etc.” Structural evidence reveals that the house was built in two stages, and that the west side is the earliest portion. The house was owned in the 1950’s by Hollie Bucklin who renovated the building so that it appears to be a medieval revival cross-gabled house.
33 East St., the Old Store (1830) - The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 near the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby, and was moved to this location in 1850 by Joseph Wait.
35 East Street, the Luther Wait house (1810) - In 1872 Luther Wait removed the County jailor's house to this location. Wait served on several town boards including the school committee and as town assessor, and served two terms as postmaster.
37 East Street, the Stephen Baker house (1834) - The small two story three bay colonial at 37 East Street was built in 1834 by Stephen Baker Jr. as a storehouse for his grocery. The lot was also used a lumber yard and Baker opened a way to the river, constructing a wharf at the end of the lane.
38 East St. Ipswich MA 38 East Street, the John Harris house (1742) - Thomas Harris purchased land along East Street in 1665. His son John was deputy sheriff and transported accused witches to Salem for trial. This sizable Georgian house was built by John Harris, 3rd or 4th generation. The property descended to Capt. Stephen Baker, whose heirs owned into the 20th Century.
42 East Street, Ipswich MA 42 East Street, the Joseph Hovey house (1850) - Joseph Hovey bought a lot in 1843 from the estate of Thomas Boardman, and an adjoining lot in the rear at about the same time from J. H. Boardman. The old Boardman house was torn down about 1850, and Joseph Hovey built a house on the lot, which appears in the 1856 map.
44 East St, Ipswich MA 44 East Street, the John Roberts house (c 1870) - The Ipswich Historical Commission records the date of construction as 1856/1872 by John Roberts, through the marriage of Mary Elizabeth Hovey (1843-1928) to John Roberts (1824-1903).
48 East St., Ipswich MA 48 East St., the Tyler Caldwell house (1860) - Tyler Caldwell was "a man of thrift and industry, and amassed a comfortable property; respected in the town and well-beloved in the neighborhood where he lived."
59 East Street, the Daniel Ringe house (1719) - The small lot fronting on East Street to Daniel Ringe, Oct. 16, 1719 . Ringe sold to John Holland, Nov. 6, 1742. Daniel Ringe was an early settler of Ipswich, and as a young man worked as a cow-herd. Captain Ringe was a soldier in the Indian wars and became a prominent citizen of Ipswich.
6 East Street, the Daniel Russell house (1818) - In 1818 Daniel Russell bought the land with the old Norton - Cobbet house on it, the home of two of the first pastors of the First Church in Ipswich. Daniel Russell, the son of Henry and Mary Lord Russell. Daniel Russell was born in Ipswich on August 14, 1767 and died on December 29 1837, having lived 70 years. His wife was Sarah Sutton.
Wainwright-Treadwell house, East St., Ipswich MA 62 East Street, the Treadwell-Wainwright House (1727) - Capt. John Wainwright bought 3 1/2 acres from Nathaniel Treadwell in 1726 (47:144) and built this fine Georgian mansion.The raised-field paneling and feather-edge sheathing found throughout the house are key features.
7 East Street, the Sadie Stockwell house (1888) - The heirs of Samuel Hunt sold the building lot to Sadie B. Stockwell and her husband Frank Stockwell, dentist on April 27, 1888 and she built the house on the lot in the same year.  The Queen Anne shingle-style home of the Victorian era is not common in Ipswich.
76 East Street, the Hodgkins – Lakeman House (c1690) - William Hodgkins built this house before 1700. In 1718 he sold the dwelling to Archelaus Lakeman and the property remained in the Lakeman family for almost 200 years. The Lakemans were a sea-faring family with extensive wharves and warehouses on the property and on the Town Wharf across the street.
78 East St., Ipswich MA 78 East Street, the James Glover hosiery factory (c 1860) - James Glover came to Ipswich from England with a long warp weaving machine about 1845. He worked at the Lower Mills until he opened his own textile factory ca. 1860. He manufactured hairnets, knit goods, hoods, and shawls. Glover employed 40-50 hands in the Civil War period, but by 1897 the mill was closed.
Matthew Perkins house, 8 East Street, built in 1709 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1701) - The Captain Matthew Perkins House at 8 East St. in Ipswich was the winner of the 1991 Mary Conley Award. The land on which the house sits was at one time part of an orchard lot and was sold to Matthew Perkins, a weaver and soldier, by Major Francis Wainwright in 1701. The 1st period 2-story structure has post-medieval overhangs front and side.
80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700) - The Perkins-Hodgkins house is believed to have been built in 1700 on the foundation of the earier Jacob Perkins home. The house has been greatly expanded over the years, but the original asymetrical structure continues to anchor the corner with Jeffreys Neck Road.
Foster Russell house, 9 East St. Ipswich MA 9 East Street, the Foster Russell house (1856) - Samuel Hunt sold a half acre at the foot of his lot on East St. to Foster Russell and D. P. Nourse, May 9, 1855, and Mr. Russell and his wife Martha Hodgkins built this house.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.