The abrupt change in the name of High Street to East Street at the intersection with North Street is odd unless one knows a bit of history. When Ipswich was laid out in the 1600’s, town center was Meetinghouse Green.  A road headed south and crossed the river — it was named South Main Street.  It continued north from the Green one block as North Main Street and ended.  From here one could go west on High Street, or East and down to the river on East Street.

East Street, 1870
East Street, 1909

Although still unpaved thirty years later, the street already looks more elegant.

East Street along the Ipswich River before the current Town Wharf was created in the early 20th Century. At that time the river came to the edge of the street.
The Hodgkins Lakeman house on East St.
The Hodgkins Lakeman house on East St. Photo by George Darling, circa 1900
East and Hovey Street intersection by George Dexter
East and Hovey Street intersection by George Dexter
The intersection of East and Spring Streets, with a Hayward Scale in the intersection, before 1900. Photo by George Dexter
The intersection of East and Spring Streets, with a Hayward Scale in the intersection, before 1900. Photo by George Dexter
10 East Street, the Nathaniel Harris house (1819) - The Nathaniel Harris house, 10 East Street is a Georgian-style house built in 1819 on a section of land from the Baker Newman property next door. His tombstone at the Old North Burying Ground shows that he died at the age of 54 in 1831, but his widow Elizabeth Staniford lived into her 90’s. The county laid a … Continue reading 10 East Street, the Nathaniel Harris house (1819)
13 East St., Ipswich MA 13 East St. (tentative: Ignatius Dodge – F. Lord house, 1856) - Physical examination of the houses at #13, 15, and 21 East Street are needed for positive identification of these houses. This page is a work in progress. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote about the lots with the four small houses along the south side of East Street before County Street. “John Annable sold the homestead of … Continue reading 13 East St. (tentative: Ignatius Dodge – F. Lord house, 1856)
Baker-Newman house, 14 East St., Ipswich MA 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725) - The Baker-Newman house at 14 East St. was built in 1725 and is an early 2nd Period 2-story, end gable half house with a Beverly jog. John Baker was granted a section of the land extending down East Street to Spring Street, originally granted to Rev. Cobbet. His son John Baker Jr. sold eight acres with … Continue reading 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725)
15 East Street, Ipswich MA 15 East Street: Dawson’s Bakery; James and Louise Glover house c 1870) - The house at #15 East Street may have been a small shop before it was converted to residences.  The 1872 map shows the building at this location as “Dawson Bakery.” Deeds show that the house at #21 East Street was #17 before houses were renumbered for the 911 system. We have tentatively identified #21 as the Russell house, … Continue reading 15 East Street: Dawson’s Bakery; James and Louise Glover house c 1870)
16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840) - Description by Historic New England On March 29 of 1837, mariner Richard Lakeman purchased the empty plot of land on which the Lakeman-Johnson House now stands from John Newmarch. The house was built sometime between the land purchase in 1837 and the sale of the property in 1846 when Lakeman sold the land “with the … Continue reading 16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840)
18 East Street, the Dodge house (1725) - The Dodge House at 18 East St. was built in 1725 and is a 2nd Period 2 story house protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the town of Ipswich. Protected elements include the front and side facades including the Beverly jog, Center brick chimney and original fabric of the four fireplaces, wide … Continue reading 18 East Street, the Dodge house (1725)
2 East Street, the Robert Jordan house (1863) - The house at 2 East Street at the end of North Main Street is the Ipswich Bed and Breakfast or Ipswich Inn. It was built by clothing store owner Robert Jordan. Robert Jordan bought this lot in 1862, and enlarged the lot by purchasing pieces of two adjoining lots in 1863. On this enlarged lot Jordan built … Continue reading 2 East Street, the Robert Jordan house (1863)
G. Russell house, 21 East St., Ipswich MA 21 East Street, the George Russell house (c 1870) - The Ipswich Historical Commission database shows the date of construction of 21 East St. as 1856-72 based on when it appeared in the town maps. The 1910 map shows the house as # 17 or #19, owned by Dr. Russell at that time. It’s in the 1884 map as well as  the 1872 map, shown as G. Russell. … Continue reading 21 East Street, the George Russell house (c 1870)
22 East Street, the Moses Fellows House (1873) - Thomas Sweet sold the lot at 22 East St. to Moses A. Fellows and Sarah G. Hodgkins on May 9, 1873 (936:1). Fellows built the present house shortly thereafter. Fellows owned a lumber yard on Water Street. At 80 years old, he retired as a farmer at this address. This house is an example of … Continue reading 22 East Street, the Moses Fellows House (1873)
25 East St., Ipswich MA the Stanwood-Willcomb house 25 East St, the Stanwood-Willcomb house (1830) - In July 1813, John Hodgkins sold John Stanwood a one-acre lot at the corner of County Street and East Street in 1813. John sold to his son Stephen in 1827, and Stephen Stanwood erected the Stanwood – Willcomb House in 1830 for a pulling mill, a cleaning process for wool. The sheep grazed on the bare hills above … Continue reading 25 East St, the Stanwood-Willcomb house (1830)
26 East Street, the John Staniford – Polly Dole house (1687-1720) - The house at 26 East St. in Ipswich is subject to preservation easements, under a Preservation Agreement held by the Ipswich Historical Commission. This salt box house has elements from 1687 but acquired its current form in 1720.  It has a large front living room with a low ceiling, wide board floors and a “walk-in” … Continue reading 26 East Street, the John Staniford – Polly Dole house (1687-1720)
27 East St., Ipswich MA 27 East Street, the Widow Elizabeth Caldwell house (1740-1755) - Joseph Wait sold this lot to Elizabeth Caldwell, widow of Thomas, in 1829. She moved a house from another site onto her property. The rear two story wing is believed to be the older house, joined together when the house was moved. Structural evidence suggest a construction dates of about 1740 to 1775 for the two sections. … Continue reading 27 East Street, the Widow Elizabeth Caldwell house (1740-1755)
3 East St., Ipswich MA the J. W. Perkins house 3 East Street, the James W. Perkins house and Provisions (1890) - Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that this lot was owned by the Rev. John Norton, pastor of the church in Ipswich from 1636-52, in his book, “Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony” Volume 1. “Mr. Norton purchased Mr. Fawn’s house on East Street, on the site of the Foster Russell house.” Samuel Hunt purchased the ancient … Continue reading 3 East Street, the James W. Perkins house and Provisions (1890)
30 East Street, the Jordan – Snelling – Potter house (c 1700) - A Publication of the Ipswich Historical Society refers to this as the John Potter House, at that time a well-preserved old mansion beneath the spreading elms on the corner of East street and “Hog Lane,” later known as Spring St. “This lot was owned in 1648 by Francis Jordan, the town-whipper, whose gruesome business it … Continue reading 30 East Street, the Jordan – Snelling – Potter house (c 1700)
33 East St., the Old Store (1830) - The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 and is known as the “Old Store.” It was built at the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby. Quimby was a native of Sandwich, New Hampshire. Ipswich Vital Records show that in 1849 at the age … Continue reading 33 East St., the Old Store (1830)
35 East Street, the Luther Wait house (1810) - The small yellow house at 35 East Street was built about 1810. It was once the Essex County jailor’s house, and may have been the office and residence of the Keeper of the Insane Asylum, which was also on the site.  It is better known as the home of Luther Wait (1841-1924), who served two terms … Continue reading 35 East Street, the Luther Wait house (1810)
37 East Street, the Stephen Baker house (1834) - The small two story three bay colonial at 37 East Street was built in 1834 by Stephen Baker Jr. as a storehouse for his grocery. The lot was also used a lumber yard and Baker opened a way to the river, constructing a wharf at the end of the lane. The Account book kept by Stephen Baker … Continue reading 37 East Street, the Stephen Baker house (1834)
38 East St. Ipswich MA 38 East Street, the John Harris house (1742) - The John Harris House at 38 East Street was built circa 1742. It is a Second Period Georgian home, 2 story, end gable, with wood frame clapboard siding. The symmetrical 5 bay façade has numerous side and rear additions dating to the early 19th Century or before. Description from MACRIS: “John Harris inherited the east side … Continue reading 38 East Street, the John Harris house (1742)
44 East St, Ipswich MA 44 East Street, the John Roberts house (c 1870) - The 1872 Ipswich map identifies this as the J. Roberts house. The Ipswich Historical Commission records the date of construction as 1856/1872 by John Roberts.  The house eventually came into the possession of the Hovey family, through the marriage of Mary Elizabeth Hovey (1843-1928) to John Roberts (1824-1903). In the 1910 Ipswich map, this house and the … Continue reading 44 East Street, the John Roberts house (c 1870)
6 East Street, the Daniel Russell house (1818) - The house at 6 East Street was built in 1818 by Daniel Russell, the son of Henry and Mary Lord Russell. Daniel Russell was born in Ipswich on August 14, 1767 and died on December 29 1837, having lived 70 years. His wife was Sarah Sutton. Daniel Russell bought the land and a house standing … Continue reading 6 East Street, the Daniel Russell house (1818)
Wainwright-Treadwell house, East St., Ipswich MA 62 East Street, the Wainwright – Treadwell House (1727) - Thomas Treadwell arrived in New England in 1635 with his wife and infant son Thomas. Excerpts from his will read that in 1671 he bequeathed to the junior Thomas his property on “Treadwell’s Island” between Labor in Vain Creek and Fox Creek. To his son Nathaniel he gave half of his upland house, barn and … Continue reading 62 East Street, the Wainwright – Treadwell House (1727)
7 East Street, the Sadie Stockwell house (1888) - The Sadie B. Stockwell house at 7 East Street in Ipswich was built in 1888. The Heirs of Samuel Hunt sold the building lot to Mrs. Sadie B. Stockwell on April 27, 1888 (577:129) and she built the house on the lot in the same year.  In the 1910 Ipswich map, the house belongs to F. H. … Continue reading 7 East Street, the Sadie Stockwell house (1888)
76 East Street, the Hodgkins – Lakeman House (c1690) - William Hodgkins came with his father William from England in 1640 and settled in Ipswich. He built a house in 1668 and died in 1693. He had a son named William as well, born in 1668, who apparently built this house in 1690. William Jr. died in 1719. William Hodgkins sold the house to his brother Christopher Hodgkins, … Continue reading 76 East Street, the Hodgkins – Lakeman House (c1690)
78 East St., Ipswich MA 78 East Street, the James Glover hosiery factory (c 1860) - James Glover came to Ipswich from England with a long warp weaving machine about 1845. He worked at the Lower Mills until he opened his own textile factory ca. 1860. He manufactured hairnets, then in vogue for ladies wear, knit goods, hoods, and shawls. Glover employed 40-50 hands during the Civil War, but the number … Continue reading 78 East Street, the James Glover hosiery factory (c 1860)
Matthew Perkins house, 8 East Street, built in 1709 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1710) - The Captain Matthew Perkins House at 8 East St. in Ipswich was the winner of the 1991 Mary Conley Award. The house dates to about 1710 and was formerly known as the Norton-Corbett House. The 1st period 2-story structure has a timber frame, clapboard siding, an elaborate pilastered chimney, a rear ell, post-medieval overhangs front … Continue reading 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1710)
80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700) - The First Period Perkins-Hodgkins house is believed to have been built in 1700 on the foundation of the earier Jacob Perkins home. The house has been greatly expanded and modernized over the years, but the original asymetrical structure continues to anchor the corner with Jeffreys Neck Road. Notable are the cellar joists, which are laid sideways instead … Continue reading 80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700)
Foster Russell house, 9 East St. Ipswich MA 9 East Street, the Foster Russell house (1856) - At 9 East Street is the Foster Russell House, was built between 1856 and 1872, according to historic maps.  Foster Russell and Martha Hodgkins  were married in Ipswich on January 29, 1829. Russell purchased the lot in 1855. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that this lot was owned by the Rev. John Norton, pastor of the … Continue reading 9 East Street, the Foster Russell house (1856)

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