Featured image: The Thomas Lord house on High Street in Ipswich dates to 1658.

Robert Lord arrived with the first settlers of Ipswich in late 1634 or early 1635, probably from Sudbury, Suffolk, England, where he was born in 1603. Soon after his arrival, Robert Lord was appointed Ipswich Town Clerk and Clerk of the Court of Ipswich and held those posts until his death in 1683. Robert Lord married Mary Waite in Finchingfield, Essex, England in 1630.

They arrived in Ipswich with four children and had five more children here: Hannah Lord, who married John Grow, Mary Lord, who married William Chandler of Newbury, Thomas Lord, who married Alice Rand of Ipswich, Robert  Lord Jr, who married Hannah Day of Ipswich, Samuel Lord, who married Elizabeth Ted of Charlestown, Abigail Lord, who married Jacob Foster of Ipswich, Sarah Lord, who married Joseph Wilson of Andover (and was arrested in the Salem witchcraft trials), Susannah Lord, who married Thomas Osgood in Ipswich, and Nathaniel Lord, who married Mary Call of Ipswich.

Almost every house on High Street has been lived in by a member of the Lord family. Asa Lord’s store anchored Lords Square for over 100 years.

Lords Square, a photographic history - Lord’s Square was known as Brewer’s Corner in early Ipswich. John Brewer was a town clerk and being on what was then the outskirts of town owned a large lot, which he divided into sections and sold. Brewer’s First Period home at 82 High Street was built in 1700 and still stands just north of … Continue reading Lords Square, a photographic history
The corner of Linebrook and Pineswamp Roads, before and after - Wilbur Fiske Ellsworth was born in Ipswich March 30, 1843, and served for many years with the Ipswich fire department. He was the fourth son of Benjamin N. Ellsworth, the esteemed Ipswich lightkeeper, and was the brother of Civil War hero Thomas Ellsworth. Wilbur Fiske and several other people in Ipswich succumbed to an epidemic of pneumonia … Continue reading The corner of Linebrook and Pineswamp Roads, before and after
79 High Street, the Thomas H. Lord house - We received an email asking for help in identifying a house which in 1854, was lived in by Caroline Farley Lord. The inquirer’s great aunt, Eunice Farley Felton wrote about the house in 1923: “We knew that Aunt Lord was an invalid and that she had lost her daughter. When summer came and schools were over, Mr. and Mrs. Farley … Continue reading 79 High Street, the Thomas H. Lord house
56 Market Street, the Lord-Sullivan-Haskell house - The Lord – Sullivan -Haskell house at 56 Market Street was built in 1847. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that “Captain John Lord made his last voyage as master of the ship Miles Standish to Calcutta sailing May 17, 1855. They were preparing for the return the following March. The ship was nearly ready for sea, … Continue reading 56 Market Street, the Lord-Sullivan-Haskell house
51 North Main Street, the Sarah Lord house - The Sarah Lord house, 51 North Main in Ipswich was built in 1849, a Greek Revival house. She was the wife of A. P. Lord, a storekeeper but contracted the house herself. The Asa Lord general merchandise store existed at Lords Square for 100 years. An earlier Sarah Lord born to Ipswich town clerk Robert … Continue reading 51 North Main Street, the Sarah Lord house
68 High Street, the John Wood – Lord house - The John Wood-Lord house at 68 High Street in Ipswich was built circa 1725. Martha Ringe was widowed with small children after her husband Daniel disappeared in 1727 while on a fishing expedition to Penobscot Bay, attacked by Indians. Under Puritan law an adult unmarried woman was a feme sole, could own property and sign contracts. A … Continue reading 68 High Street, the John Wood – Lord house
85 High Street, the Elizabeth and Phillip Lord house - The Elizabeth and Phillip Lord house is at 85 High Street in Ipswich. The following is an updated excerpt from a story written by Alice Keeton in “Ipswich Yesterday” : The house was built about 1774 by Mr. Phillip Lord when he married the widowed Elizabeth Kimball Warner who owned the property. We must state right here that this … Continue reading 85 High Street, the Elizabeth and Phillip Lord house
73 High Street, the Nathaniel Lord house - The house at 73 High Street is named after Nathaniel Lord who graduated from Harvard and spent 36 years as the Register of Probate in the Ipswich Court. His sons all entered the legal profession and one followed him in the same position. In 1824 General Lafayette visited our town and was met by a crowd … Continue reading 73 High Street, the Nathaniel Lord house
59 East Street, the Daniel Ringe – A.P. Lord house - The Ringe – Lord house at 59 East Street in Ipswich is a one-room-deep Georgian home at the corner created by the intersection of Water Street and East Street. Its origin has been dated between 1815 and 1832 under the ownership of A.P. Lord, but Thomas Franklin Waters recorded that Daniel Ringe built the house in the early 1700’s,  which would be more … Continue reading 59 East Street, the Daniel Ringe – A.P. Lord house
21 High Street, the Haskell – Lord house - The house at 21 High Street is said to be on the site of the home built by early settler Robert Lord who arrived in late 1634. Robert Lord was born in Sudbury, England in 1603 and was one of the earliest settlers of Ipswich, arriving in late 1634 or early 1635 with his wife … Continue reading 21 High Street, the Haskell – Lord house
52 High Street, the Henry Kingsbury – Robert Lord house - This gorgeous large house dates to 1660. The front is asymmetrical, and  west end is the older original section. Chamfered timbers can still be observed in the stone foundation for one of its 10 chimneys. It was once used as a private school. View MACRIS In A Walking tour of Ipswich we read that “While the builder Henry Kingsbury was … Continue reading 52 High Street, the Henry Kingsbury – Robert Lord house
17 High Street, the Thomas Lord house - The Thomas Lord house at 17 High Street in Ipswich features original champfored summer beams, unpainted feather edge paneling in the front rooms and hall, an original saltbox frame, center chimney and five cooking fireplaces with bake ovens and large hearths. The saltbox roof slopes down to one story in the rear. The front entry features the original … Continue reading 17 High Street, the Thomas Lord house

4 thoughts on “Homes of the Lords

  1. Would love to read about the house I grew up in-known as the Dow farm–69 Jeffrey’s Neck Road.

    1. The 1910 map shows that lot as belonging to G. A. Hodgdon. The most recent purchase was in 2013. The town database shows the house at 69 Jeffreys Neck Rd. was built in 1941. Has the address changed? Here’s the photo. null

  2. That’s so interesting, thanks for sharing the info with us. I’m descended from Robert Lord who was and my seventh Great grandfather.

  3. My ancestor, Robert Lord married to Hannah Day, was born in 1624 in Towchester, Nothhampton, England and died in Charlestown, MA in 1678. So he could not have been the son of Robert and Mary Waite who married in 1630. His parents were Thomas Lord, born 1585 in Towchester and Dorothy Bird ,born 1586, also of Towchester.

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