Tercentenary plaque, the Andros Rebellion Ipswich MAAndros Rebellion

The Ipswich Revolt of 1687

In front of the Methodist Church in Ipswich where the old Town House once stood is a sign erected during the Massachusetts Tercentenary Celebrations that reads as follows:

“Here on August 23, 1687, the Citizens of Ipswich. led by the Reverend John Wise, denounced the levy of taxes by the arbitrary government of Sir Edmund Andros, and from their protest sprang the American Revolution of 1689.

 

 

Appleton's Pulpit Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Commission The defiant Samuel Appleton - In 1687, a warrant was issued for the arrest of several Ipswich men for being "seditiously inclined and disaffected to his Majesty's government." The 62-year-old Major Samuel Appleton scorned the appearance of submission and remained imprisoned in the cold Boston Jail through the winter.
Birthplace of American Independence - Resistance by the citizens and leaders of Ipswich to a tax imposed by the Crown in 1687 is commemorated in the seal of the town of Ipswich, which bears the motto, "The Birthplace of American Independence 1687."
Tercentenary plaque, the Andros Rebellion Ipswich MA The Ipswich Revolt of 1687 - On August 23, 1687, the citizens of Ipswich, led by the Reverend John Wise, denounced the levy of taxes by the arbitrary government of Sir Edmund Andros, and from their protest sprang the American Revolution of 1689.
John Wise Tercentenary sign, Rt. 133, Essex MA The Rev. John Wise of Ipswich - The concepts of freedom about which Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence originated from the pen of the Rev. John Wise of Ipswich: "The first human subject and original of civil power is the people...and when they are free, they may set up what species of government they please."
2 North Main Street, the John Appleton house (1707) - This was the first house in Ipswich to have a third story, which was removed by Daniel Noyes around 1768 after he bought the house. In 1962 the Appleton House was purchased by Exxon, which intended to build a gas station on the site. The Ipswich Heritage Trust was formed to save the house, the first major preservation action in Ipswich.
6 South Main Street, the Shoreborne Wilson – Samuel Appleton house (1685) - This house was built by joiner Sherborne Wilson,. The house was purchased in 1702 by Col. Samuel Appleton, the eldest son of Major Samuel Appleton. At the time it was still a two-room central chimney structure, and it is believed that Appleton expanded the building on the southeast side. The house is listed in the National Historic Register of Historic Places.

3 replies »

  1. Hi Gordon,

    What a great clip. Thank you for clarifying the Andros episode. I was never sure just why he was ousted. Interesting how his appearance on this side of the pond was related to events during the English Revolution. Cheers for the Ipswich resistance! Also you provided excellent info on how his confiscation of land was related to the Salem Witch trials.

    Today we took a sentimental journey from Lynnfield to Ipswich and drove around Jeffery’s Neck. It was a beautiful late autumn afternoon. I believe I told you that my sister, a Notre Dame nun, lived out there for several years before moving to the order’s facility in Worcester. She died recently and we wanted to reminisce about our many treks to Ipswich. Still following your wonderful blog. Keep up your good work!

    Like

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