The Whipple House being moved from Saltonstall Street to its present location at the South Green.Houses

Ipswich houses that were moved

Ipswich has over 40 houses or other buildings that were moved, or have sections that were moved from a different location. Many other small outbuildings in town were also moved decades ago and are still standing.

The Hayes house in Ipswich was moved from Central St. to Mount Pleasant Street 4 Mount Pleasant Ave., the William Mayes building, c 1890 - The house at 4 Mount Pleasant Ave. was originally the William Mayes apartments and boarding house at the corner of Central and Manning Streets.
33 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 33 Mineral Street, the Caroline Norman house, 1884 (moved from Central St.) - The house at 33 Mineral Street was moved from the location of Cumberland Farms on Central street in Ipswich.
Holland-Cogswell house, corner of Green and County Streets, Ipswich MA 9 Green Street, the Elizabeth Holland house (1811) - The house on the southeast corner of County Street was built by Elizabeth Holland on Meeting House Green in 1811, and was moved to lot by John How Cogswell between 1872 and 1884.
124 High Street, the Joseph King House, Ipswich MA 124 High Street, the Joseph King house (1856) - The house was moved to its present location when the High Street bridge was built in 1906. The King House was constructed in an older Federal style, and originally had a frontispiece with fan and sidelights.
3 County Street, Ipswich MA 3 County Street, the William Treadwell house (1850) - The house does not appear on the Ipswich maps through 1910, at which time this tiny parcel was owned by Dr. Russell. It may be a wing of the Captain William Treadwell house which was removed from the other corner of East Street in order to widen the intersection.
10 Washington St. 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770) - The house was constructed before 1770 at 45 N. Main St., and was moved to this location in 1860 by Michael Ready. The second floor was probably added at that time.
Josephy Manning house, South Main Street, Ipswich 31 South Main Street, the Joseph Manning house (1727) - A house on this lot was purchased by Timothy Souther in 1794 and stayed in the Souther family until 1860. It was taken down in 1917, and the Dr. Joseph Manning house was moved to this location so that an automobile dealership could be constructed across from the Old Town Hall.
Th e Asa Stone Barn on Northgate Road in Ipswich MA 27 Northgate Road, the Asa Stone Barn (1839) - This restored barn was moved from its previous location on Argilla Rd. The barn is a good example of an early 19th century “Yankee Ground Barn."
Thomas Morley house, 48 North Main St., Ipswich MA 48 North Main Street, the Thomas Morley house (c 1750, alt. 1845) - This house and its northern neighbor, 50 North Main, were a single structure before 1845, when Thomas Morley bought the southern portion of that house,  separated and rotated it 90° to present a gable end to the street, and finished it for his dwelling. Thomas Morley was an artist and taught painting in his school on Summer St., which stood behind the present 47 North Main.
William Warner house, 35 Mill Rd. Ipswich MA 35 Mill Road, the Captain William Warner house (1780) - The road from the dam to Topsfield road was originally located west of Mill Rd. This house was moved from its original location near the bridge, and a section of the old road is now the driveway.
27 East St., Ipswich MA 27 East Street, the Widow Elizabeth Caldwell house (1740-1755) - Joseph Wait sold this lot to Elizabeth Caldwell, widow of Thomas, in 1829. She moved a house from another site onto her property. The rear two story wing is believed to be the older house, joined together when the house was moved. Structural evidence suggest a construction dates of about 1740 to 1775 for the two sections.
1 Manning Street, the E.H. Martin house (1880) - The E. H. Martin house originally faced Central Street. It was moved back one lot and turned to face Manning St.
30 Summer Street, the Smith-Barton house (moved 1880) - The house at 30-32 Summer Street may have been the High Street home of Daniel Smith, and was moved to the current location in the 1880’s by John Conley. The house was occupied by Civil War Veteran John Barton.
437 Linebrook Road, the John, Silas and Allen Perley house (1784) - Part of this structure is an older home that was moved from Rowley to this location by John Perley. He and his son Silas expanded it in either direction. Over the years, a large area of land along Linebrook Road came into the possession of the Perley family.
33 East St., the Old Store (1830) - The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 near the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby, and was moved to this location in 1850 by Joseph Wait.
30 South Main Street, the Old Town Hall (1833) - The Unitarians built their church here in 1833 but sold it to the town ten years later to be used as town hall. The lower section was constructed at the corner, the old Unitarian Church was moved on top.
Richards house, Kimball Ave. 8 Kimball Ave, the W. B. Richards house (b 1910) - This house originally was at Lords Square, owned by W. B. Richards. In 1940 the home was moved over the High Street bridge to 8 Kimball Avenue where it still stands today, and Mutual built a new service station which now houses Tick's Auto Service.
County Street, Ipswich MA 17 County Street, Daniels Shoe Factory (1843) - This house was built in 1843 near the EBSCO dam as Hoyt’s Veneer Mill. It was moved in 1859 to its present location where it became the Perkins & Daniels Stocking Factory. Farley & Daniels succeeded in 1884. 
52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Shatswell Planters Cottage (c 1646) - This small building on Strawberry Hill was moved from High Street and is believed to have been the original planters cottage of John Shatswell or his son Richard.
24 Fellows Road, the Fellows – Appleton House (b 1856) - The earliest section of the Joseph Fellows – Daniel W. Appleton House at 24 Fellows Road was built before 1693. It was moved to this location and greatly altered in 1832 by Daniel W. Appleton.
Martin Keith house, Candlewood Rd. Ipswich 36 Candlewood Road, the Martin Keith house (1807, moved 1995) - The Martin Keith House (1807) is a fine Federal era specimen that stood for two centuries in Middleborough MA. by 1990 it was barely salvageable with rotted sills and interior damage. In 1995 buyers from Ipswich agreed to have it restored on their property.
79 County Road, the Kinsman house (1820) - The house was built in approximately 1820, and was moved back on the lot when the Verizon telephone company building was constructed in the 20th Century.
155 Argilla Road, Asa P. Stone house (b. 1839) - This house is said to have beeen moved to this location from Newbury. Architectural features suggest an 18th Century origin. Asa P. Stone acquired possession and built a barn on the property in 1839. That barn was recently moved to Northgate Road and restored.
16 Elm Street, the Baker – Tozer house (1835) - Samuel S. Baker, active in real estate, bought the lot at 16 Elm Street and built this house in 1835. He sold it to shoemaker William S. Tozer (1804-1860) in 1841. The house is said to be three combined structures, one having been moved from a different location.
20 Market Street, the Stacey-Ross house (1734) - In 1733 John Stacey "being incapable of labor " petitioned the town that he may build a house beside the rocky ledge on the lower North Green "for selling cakes and ale for his livelihood." The house was moved to this location 100 years after its construction.
22 Mineral Street, the Ephraim Harris House (1696, alt. 1835) - The earliest sections of this house were built by Daniel Warner in 1696 on Market Street. In 1835, Ephraim Harris, builder, was commissioned by Capt. Robert Kimball to build a new house on the lot. Harris removed a portion of the Warner house to his own land at the corner of Central and Mineral Streets, and enlarged it.
Payne School, Lords Square 1 Lords Square, Payne School (1802) - In 1802, the North District decided to construct a schoolhouse with public subscription. In 1891 it was moved from its previous location where the laundromat is now, and received extensive repairs. Payne School was last used for students in 1942, and since 1972 has served as the Ipswich School superintendent's office.
4 Water Street, the Jewett house (1849) - This lot was sold In 1848 to William H. Jewett and Thomas L. Jewett from the estate of Moses Jewett. The house was built in 1849 from lumber taken from the 1747 Meeting House of the First Church when it was torn down, prior to the building of the Gothic church that stood on that location for a century. In the 1930's this house was the home of Joseph F. Claxton an Ipswich selectman.
Nathaniel Hodgkins house, Turkey Shore Road 48 Turkey Shore Road, the Nathaniel Hodgkins house (c 1720) - This gambrel-roof house was built after Hodgkins bought the lot in 1720.The front original section. has late First Period construction, while the rear wing was moved and attached to it later.
1 South Green, the Captain John Whipple House (1677) - The oldest part of the house dates to 1677 when Captain John Whipple constructed a townhouse near the center of Ipswich. The Historical Commission moved it over the Choate bridge to its current location and restored to its original appearance.
83 Central Street, the International House (1866) - In 1866 the International House was built by the Eastern Railroad beside the Ipswich Depot. It was moved in 1882 to make room for a new depot. It continued to be operated as a hotel, and In the 1970's and 80's was known as the House of Hinlin.
35 East Street, the Luther Wait house (1810) - In 1872 Luther Wait removed the County jailor's house to this location. Wait served on several town boards including the school committee and as town assessor, and served two terms as postmaster.
John Wade house, County Rd. Ipswich 85 County Road, the John Wade house (1810) - The John Wade house was built at the far end of South Green in 1810, but was moved further down County Road in 1948 to make room for the South Green Burial Ground expansion. This house bears remarkable similarity to the homes of housewrights Asa Wade and Samuel Wade, both still standing in their original locations on County Rd. facing the South Green.
45 County Street, the Amos Dunnels house (1823) - The Amos Dunnels house was constructed in 1823 on South Main St. and was moved to 45 County St. in the 20th Century.
12 Warren Street, the Albert P. Hills house (1700) - The Ipswich town assessors site indicates that this small house was constructed in 1700. If this is true, the building was moved to this location early in the 20th Century,
8 Warren Street, the Harris – Grady house (1720-1772-1887) - In 1887, William Russell removed a house built in 1772 by James Harris at 12 High Street and built his Victorian house. The old house at that location was removed to 8 Warren St., in the ownership of David Grady, and expanded.
5-7 Poplar Street, the Dr. John Calef house (1671) - This house was built on South Main St. between 1671 and 1688 by Deacon Thomas Knowlton. In the mid-18th Century the house was owned by Dr. John Calef. a Loyalist. John Heard moved the house to its present location in order to build his elaborate Federalist home which now houses the Ipswich Museum.
5 County Street, the Richard Rindge house (1718) - The First Period house at 5 County Street was originally on upper Summer St., moved to this location in the last half of the 19th Century.
Burnham-Brown house, 86 County Rd., Ipswich MA 86 County Road, the Burnham – Brown house (1775) - This house was built in 1775 on a lot on Candlewood Rd., probably by Thomas Burnham. In 1821 Nathan Brown bought the house from Oliver Appleton, and 3 years later he removed it to its present site on County Rd. Brown and others enlarged and remodeled the old Burnham House, but some 18th century features remain.
52 Jeffreys Neck Rd. Ipswich Ross Tavern 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Ross Tavern – Lord Collins house (c 1690) - The house was moved from South Main Street in 1940 by David Wendel and restored to a high-style First Period appearance on the basis of observed physical evidence. The Collins-Lord house on High Street was moved and attached to the rear of this house.
Samuel Kinsman house, 53 Argilla Rd., Ipswich 53 Argilla Road, the Samuel Kinsman house (1750-77) - Samuel Kinsman received this property in a bequest from his father Capt. John Kinsman, who married Hannah Burnham in 1733. The house is generally dated circa 1750 with a 1777 wing from an existing structure that was moved.
3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803) - This house dates to about 1720 and was a single-floor 2 room cape moved to this location in 1803. The first floor outside corners have gunstock posts, evidence that they once supported the roof.
51 Linebrook Road, the Hart House (1678) - The oldest parts of the Hart House were apparently constructed in 1678-80 by Samuel Hart, the son of Thomas Hart, an Irish tanner who arrived in Ipswich in 1637. The two oldest rooms are exact duplicates of the originals, which were moved to museums in the early 20th Century.
83 County Road, the Rogers-Brown-Rust House (1665-1723) - The house at 83 County Road is believed to be three houses joined together, at least one from the First Period. In 1836 the house and lot were conveyed to the South Parish as a church site. Asa Brown bought the house and removed it to its present location.
The Isaac Goodale house, built in 1668, was moved to this location at 153 Argilla Road 153 Argilla Road, the Isaac Goodale House (1670) - This First Period house was built in West Peabody before 1695. In 1928 it was reconstructed at 153 Argilla Road by Robert and Susan Goodale.
The Whipple House being moved from Saltonstall Street to its present location at the South Green. Ipswich houses that were moved - Ipswich has over 40 houses or other buildings that were moved, or have sections that were moved from a different location. Many other small outbuildings in town were also moved decades ago and are still standing.
Ipswich MA 16 Elm Street house at the Smithsonian Museum Choate-Caldwell House, 16 Elm St. (Now at Smithsonian) - In 1963 this house was slated for destruction, but through the efforts of local preservationists was relocated to the Smithsonian where it resides as the Museum’s largest artifact on permanent display.
Tedfords MA building The old grain elevator at Tedfords - The building had a long history of use by several businesses for grain storage. It was moved from its original location near the Town Wharf to its present location at Brown Square.

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5 replies »

  1. Most notably to all these homes is an Ipswich house that was moved almost 500 miles away. It is presently the largest structure ever displayed at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. It is a house that sheltered all manner of Americans for over 200 years from the 18th century. Today, it is enjoyed by all Americans and people from around the world while providing examples in craftmenship and the lifestyles of many generations of owners from our colonial period, the American Revolution and both world wars. It was saved from destruction and moved in 1963.

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  2. My father frank blunda built a cape house in 1950s across the st from current dairy queen. It was moved back to dornell rd. At this site is a hotel now. We sold strawberries at a stand there. Kevin Perkins Blunda

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  3. Remarkable that so many retained their chimneys. Gloucester houses were never moved with the chimneys.
    To hear about Gloucester’s “over the top” history in moving houses come to Cape Ann Museum Sat. at 3:00PM. Gloucester’s mayor, John S. Parsons and his son, Henry, also a mayor, rearranged downtown Gloucester. Call the museum for required reservations.

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    • What about Josiah Caldwell house that was literally moved to the smithsonian American history museum and is known as the ‘Within These Walls’ exhibit? I live near DC and have visited this exhibit of my ancestors home many times. Beverly Caldwell Book

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