First Period

Three old houses that stood on High Street at Manning and Mineral

Excerpts from an article by Paul McGinley.

Featured image: The house on the left in this old photo is the Caleb Lord House, on the corner of Manning and High Streets. Notice the very steep slope of the roof which hangs over the second story windows, and the massive center chimney.

While High street was one of the town’s very earliest streets, laid out in 1634, Manning Street is relatively young. It was built in 1882 and is named after the well-known family of Ipswich doctors and entrepreneurs. Dr. Thomas Manning gave most of his estate to the town to establish a high school which was built and dedicated on August 26, 1874. Manning Street was laid out and built shortly thereafter.

The Caleb Lord House, corner of High and Manning

The Caleb Lord house at the corner of Manning and High St.
Top of Manning St., the Caleb Lord house. Photo by George Dexter
The Caleb Lord house
The Caleb Lord house

These are traditional characteristics of Ipswich’s First Period houses (built between 1640 and 1725). To its west of the Caleb Lord house is another very early house that was torn down, and for a long time a vacant lot remained. You can see that it was a double house, two houses joined together.

The Caleb Lord houe was replaced by the brown house in this currentphoto fo the corner from the same location. It is a typical four-square house of the 1920's and 30's. Behind it once can see a house that was erected in the early 21st Century. Although it has somewhat similar proportions to the house in the earlier photo, this is a modern house with vinyl siding and is raised substantially above the yard level. The roof pitch is much shallower.
The Caleb Lord house on the corner of High and Manning Streets was replaced in 1927 by the home of Bernard Sullivan. Behind is a house erected in the early 21st Century.

The Jacob Manning house, corner of High and Manning

The Art of the Americas wing at the MFA (Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts features the second-floor framing of the Manning house built in Ipswich about 1692 across Manning Street from the house above. When it was razed in 1925, the timber frame was preserved and put on display at the Museum.

The upstairs frame of the Manning house is at the MFA in Boston
The upstairs frame of the Manning house is at the MFA in Boston
Photo of the Manning house at the MFA
The Manning House was probably built by William Stewart in 1693. In 1818, the house was purchased by Jacob Manning. The house was across Manning Street from the Caleb Lord house. This photo of the Manning House at the Museum of Fine Arts was taken by William Sumner in 1923.
manning beam
Manning house frame in its new display in the Americas Wing

occupied by the North Shore Mall in Peabody. Read more about the Manning House display.

The Baker House, corner of High and Mineral

The Baker house was built in approximately 1686 and stond at the corner of High St and Mineral St. Very conspicuous with its low overhanging straw roof, it was deemed a fire hazard and was raized in 1849.

The Baker house was built in approximately 1686 and stond at the corner of High St and Mineral St. Very conspicuous with its low overhanging straw roof, It was deemed a fire hazard and was razed in 1849. The sketch predates the small green cottage, but the Federal-era houses at 42 High St and 44 High St., and the Georgian William Caldwell house beyond it still stand.

The corner of High St. and Mineral St. in Ipswich
The same view today
high-mineral-manning-1832

2 replies »

  1. Interesting old photo of the Caleb Lord home done by George Dexter. I have several framed photos by George Dexter and they are mostly of Ipswich marsh lands and some he added color. I would like to send you pictures of my collection if I had the email for this site.

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