2021 stats for the Historic Ipswich websiteCommentary

2021 stats for the Historic Ipswich website

2021 was the tenth year for what began as a hobby blog about our scenic and historic community. This year for the first time there were over 300,000 site visits with half a million page views. The most popular post on the site for the second year in a row is the late John Fiske’s article, “Painting your historic house, a guide to colors and color schemes.” Close behind was the home page, which garnered about 30,000 views. Genealogy continues to be a hot topic online and for visitors to the town. The page Settlers and early inhabitants of Ipswich had 9466 views and the Ipswich Visitor Center page was visited 8378 times.

Ipswich and the Salem witchcraft trials is always in the top ten, and Four-year-old Dorothy Good is jailed for witchcraft, March 24, 1692 was one of the most-read stories with over 7000 page views. Several pages about the Native Americans who lived here were widely read, especially The Great Dying 1616-1619, “By God’s visitation, a wonderful plague”.

Although Ipswich is famous for its First Period houses, the page Historic houses of Ipswich was visited only 4600 times. The Whipple House was the most-visited house in that category with 2969 page views. Renovation of 9 Poplar St., the Seward – Mavroides house (1873) on HGTV made it the second most viewed house on the site. There was also a lot of curiosity about the First Period house at 30 East Street, the Francis Jordan house which was on the market this year. Some of the over 600 pages about Ipswich houses received less than 200 views, but cumulatively they are the most-read pages on the site.

Categories: Commentary

Tagged as:

18 replies »

  1. Congratulations on the milestone. Honored to be living in the presence of our modern day “Waters and Brown”. Keep up the great work!

  2. Congratulations on the milestone. Honored to be living in the presence of our modern day “Waters and Brown”. Keep up the amazing work!

  3. Thank you Gordon for teaching us about our beautiful town. We should plan a trip to the Smithsonian to see our Ipswich exhibit once the pandemic subsides!
    Thank you again,
    Cathy Riccio

    • Happy 2022! This morning I was telling my husband how our grandson was named “Thomas” after Thomas Duston whose wife had been captured by Indians in New England and escaped killing her captors. He said I saw that plaque while traveling along the Canadian border! We did some research and discovered much more of the story. He had no idea of the connection when he photographed the monument. It can be a small world; Liam Thomas is a determined, helpful 9 year old in Idaho, I am rethinking that bow and arrow set I got him for Christmas !!

  4. Gordon, the good people of Ipswich are fortunate to have you as their historian in residence, always unearthing and preserving the town’s lore and legacy. Wishing you the best in your historical pursuits in the New Year…

  5. Impressive!

    On Fri, Dec 31, 2021 at 5:17 PM Historic Ipswich wrote:

    > Gordon Harris posted: ” This was the tenth birthday for was began as a > small hobby, a blog about our scenic and historic community. This year for > the first time there were over 300,000 site visits with half a million page > views. The most popular post on the site for the second ” >

  6. This is a wonderful site with so many interesting, informative, & entertaining articles. Thank you so much, Gordon, for all of your efforts. I have learned many great history lessons from here.

  7. I love this site, Gordon, and I so appreciate the time and energy you put into the research! Thanks to all who contribute. I’m looking forward to future articles!

  8. You have brought to light Ipswich’s historic importance and beauty. Thank you, Gordon, and all the contributors. I’ve visited Ipswich twice and, in my heart of hearts, I wish I could live there…in one of those First Period homes!!

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.