Histories of a few Ipswich houses and buildings constructed in the Twentieth Century.

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William G. Horton house, 94 Essex Road, Ipswich MA 94 Essex Road, the William G. Horton house (c 1900) - The house at 94 Essex Road in Ipswich was built between 1884, when the land belonged to W. Kinsman, and 1910, when the W. G. Horton house appears in the 1910 Ipswich map. The old grain elevator at Tedford’s Lumber was once operated by William G. Horton Grain, Flower and Fee.. Between it and the Burke … Continue reading 94 Essex Road, the William G. Horton house (c 1900)
12 Argilla Rd., Ipswich MA 12 Argilla Road, the N. J. Bolleg house (c 1900) - The first known owner of this house is N.J. Bolleg, who resided here in 1910. The house is a fine example of a Queen Anne Cottage. Hallmarks of this house include a wealth of shingle types and an exceptional shingled carriage house in the rear which retains a cupola. Sources: Margaret Welden, MACRIS Ipswich Business … Continue reading 12 Argilla Road, the N. J. Bolleg house (c 1900)
10 Brown Street, Ipswich MA 10 Brown Street, Essex Hosiery Company worker housing (c 1900) - Brown St. is lined with these small “folk Victorian”cottages built around the beginning of the 20th Century. The house is typical of the Brown and Mineral Street “folk victorian” homes built at the end of the 19th Century, often from plans available through architectural magazines. The style in Ipswich was generally L-shaped with a porch … Continue reading 10 Brown Street, Essex Hosiery Company worker housing (c 1900)
29 Labor in Vain Road, Ipswich MA 29 Labor in Vain Rd. (c 1900) - The history of this house has not been researched.
38 Central Street, Ipswich MA 38 Central Street, the Measures building (c 1900) - Austin Measures built the Measures Building at 38 Central Street sometime after the Central Street fire of 1894.  Measures’ Candy Shop was a long-lasting institution that was begun by William Willcomb in a small small building on North Main Street. Measures was the next owner, and the building was taken down in 1904 to construct … Continue reading 38 Central Street, the Measures building (c 1900)
Rice estate, Ipswich MA 251 Topsfield Road, Turner Hill (1900) - Construction on the Turner Hill mansion-house on Topsfield Road began in 1900. The story below contains excerpts from “A Short History of the Rice Estate, 1890-1945” by Rev. Robert F. Ippolito, M.S., published in 1976, with pictures from the October 1903 issue of “Architectural Review.” Additional photos are provided by the Turner Hill Residential Community site. Anne … Continue reading 251 Topsfield Road, Turner Hill (1900)
Ipswich Ale Brewery 2 Brewery Place (Brown Square) Ipswich Ale Brewery (c 1900) - Thomas, George, Stephen and Peter Soffron and their sister Virginia were the children of a couple who moved from Greece to Ipswich, to work in the mills.  The four brothers, Tom, George, Pete and Steve opened a clam shucking operation  in the former Burke Heel factory. Saffron Brothers were the exclusive suppliers of clams to … Continue reading 2 Brewery Place (Brown Square) Ipswich Ale Brewery (c 1900)
Mayflower Restaurant, Ipswich MA 11 Depot Square, Russell’s Lunch (circa 1900) - (Excerpts from a 1972 article in Ipswich Today, published by Donna and Harris Smith) “That delectable delicacy known as the Ipswich fried clam has become a respectable part of nearly every menu from coast to coast. Almost every resident in Ipswich, 70 years of age and older who remembers Russell’s Lunch in Depot Square is … Continue reading 11 Depot Square, Russell’s Lunch (circa 1900)
29 Woods Lane, A.L.R. Mahoney house (c 1900) - Built circa 1900, the house at 29 Woods Lane appears on the 1910 Ipswich map with the name “Mrs. A.L.K. Mahoney. The 1953 transfer of deed for the house at 29 Woods Lane from Maynard C. Jewett to Peter and Mildred Stamatakos reads as follows: “A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated … Continue reading 29 Woods Lane, A.L.R. Mahoney house (c 1900)
Fairview house, County Rd., Ipswich MA 5 Hemlock Drive: Fairview, the Charles Campbell estate (1900) - Hidden in the woods near the corner of County Rd. and Lakeman’s Lane is a beautiful “Tudor Revival” house, built in 1900 for Charles A Campbell. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote about the early history of the property in Volume II, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony: “On the east side of the Bay Road, the great tract of pasture, tillage … Continue reading 5 Hemlock Drive: Fairview, the Charles Campbell estate (1900)
28 Topsfield Road, Sacred Heart Church (1903) - *Information and text for this post is from the MACRIS listing for Sacred Heart Rectory by Christine S. Beard. Quotes are from articles published in the Boston Herald and the Boston Globe. When large numbers of Polish immigrants began coming to Ipswich in the late 19th and early 20th centuries they brought with them their strong ties to the … Continue reading 28 Topsfield Road, Sacred Heart Church (1903)
Hellenic Center, Ipswich MA 117 County Road, the Hellenic Center (1904) - The land on the west side of the Old Bay Road (County Road) in Ipswich was originally divided into six acre lots reaching from the road to the river, which were allotted to the original settlers. Rev. Nathaniel Rogers, Pastor of the Ipswich Church, owned two of these six acre lots which were inherited by … Continue reading 117 County Road, the Hellenic Center (1904)
22 North Main Street, the Colonial Building (1904) - The Colonial Building at 22 North Main Street was built in 1904 as a commercial attempt by the Feoffees of the Little Neck Trust. Ralph A. Daniels of Rowley had a furniture store in the building and Howard J. Blake, jr. had a hardware store at one time. One floor of the building was rented by … Continue reading 22 North Main Street, the Colonial Building (1904)
Ipswich MA Central Street Fire Station 55 Central Street, Central Fire Station (1907) - The fire station on Central Street in Ipswich was built in 1907, replacing the fire house at Lord’s Square. Originally built for horse-drawn equipment, it took over the work of the smaller departments at the Old Town Hall, Warren St., Candlewood Rd. and several other locations in town when it became motorized. For over a century, the building has served as the town’s … Continue reading 55 Central Street, Central Fire Station (1907)
30 Jeffreys Neck Road, The Searle estate (1910) - The summer estate of Charles P. Searle on Jeffreys Neck Road, which he named Inglisby, was built in 1910. It is situated on an expansive terrace where one could look out beyond the fields at the extensive salt marshes. The mansion was designed in the form of a Florentine villa, and the living room and … Continue reading 30 Jeffreys Neck Road, The Searle estate (1910)
Richards house, Kimball Ave. 8 Kimball Ave, the W. B. Richards house (b 1910) - At 8 Kimball Avenue is a house that once sat at Lords Square, owned by W. B  Richards. The 1911 Town Report lists him as an assessor.  Harold Bowen wrote in “Tales of Olde Ipswich” that there was a store at this location as well, owned by the Richards family. The house appears in the … Continue reading 8 Kimball Ave, the W. B. Richards house (b 1910)
Hayes house, County Rd., Ipswich M 70 County Road, the John Hayes house (1910) - The John Hayes house at 70 County Road in Ipswich is one of the newest structures in the South Village Green district, even though it was built in 1910, with modifications in 1925. The hip roof , the generous front porch and extended eaves draw from the Arts and Crafts architectural styles of the early … Continue reading 70 County Road, the John Hayes house (1910)
Lathrop house, Poplar St. in Ipswich 1 Poplar Street, the Lathrop house (1912) - The Lathrop house at 1 Poplar Street is one of the two newer buildings in the South Green National Historic District, built in 1912. The construction style is  “four square” with a front porch, dormers and bay windows. This lot is part of the old “School Orchard”, the land  bordered by County Road, Poplar Street, … Continue reading 1 Poplar Street, the Lathrop house (1912)
327 High Street, Ipswich MA 327 High Street, the Annie Donovan house (1873, reconstructed 1915) - This site was purchased by Captain Moses Jewett in the third quarter of the 18th century when he extended his holdings north to the Rowley line. Eliza Jewett and Mark F. Cate became owners in 1826 and in 1845 Cate sold a one-half acre lot to his son, Aaron T. Cate, who was a cordwainer. … Continue reading 327 High Street, the Annie Donovan house (1873, reconstructed 1915)
4 Maple St., Ipswich MA 4 Maple Avenue, the Arthur H. and Madeline H. Tozer house (1915) - The house at 4 Maple Ave. was built between 1910 and 1916. Arthur Tozer was a music teacher for the public schools and apparently worked out of his home. Prior to construction of this house, land on which it stands was part of a larger parcel belonging to G. Tozier. IPS.321, Arthur H. and Madeline H. … Continue reading 4 Maple Avenue, the Arthur H. and Madeline H. Tozer house (1915)
3 Maple St., Ipswich 3 Maple Avenue, the Harland and Blanche Burke house (1916) - This house was built between 1916 and 1919 for Hariand and Blanche Burke. Hariand Burke was a superintendent at F.L. Burke & Son, heel manufacturers whose factory was at Brown Square. Prior to construction of the house, land on which it stands was part of a larger lot at 5 Maple Street belonging to G. … Continue reading 3 Maple Avenue, the Harland and Blanche Burke house (1916)
126 County Road, Cable Hospital (1917) - The Benjamin Stickney Cable Memorial Hospital was built in 1917 at the intersection of Essex and County Roads on the former Kimball estate, known in Colonial times as Windmill Hill. Richard Teller Crane Jr. purchased the land on which the building sits and made a further donation of $145,000 to the construction fund. The Georgian Revival building was … Continue reading 126 County Road, Cable Hospital (1917)
126 High Street, Burnham’s Antiques (c 1920) - In the second half of the 19th Century, hooked rugs gained immense popularity due to the efforts of a Maine Peddler named Edward Sands Frost. Commercial rug designs supplanted older traditions and led to the acceptance of hooked rugs as decorative objects, although the rug was beginning to be shaped by forces outside of the rug hooker, … Continue reading 126 High Street, Burnham’s Antiques (c 1920)
33 Central Street, Memorial Hall (1921) - In 1921 the Memorial Building was voted to be built in memory of Ipswich Veterans of all wars at a cost of $52,000. It was used to house two 6th grade classes (52 pupils) from 1969-1971 and as an office facility for the Pupil Personnel department during the years 1974-1980. In May, 1921, Montf and … Continue reading 33 Central Street, Memorial Hall (1921)
Crane Castle Ipswich MA A history of Castle Hill and Crane Castle (1924) - Castle Hill on the Crane Estate from Above Summit on Vimeo. The land on Castle Hill, Castle Neck and Crane Beach all belongs to the Trustees of Reservations, but historically the three areas were not always owned by the same family, and passed through a chain of ownership by the Symonds-Eppes, Bennett, Patch-Lakeman, Burnham-Brown, and … Continue reading A history of Castle Hill and Crane Castle (1924)
26 Manning Street, the Sullivan house (1927) - The “First Period” Caleb Lord house on the corner of High and Manning Streets was removed in 1927 and was  replaced by by the house in the photo on the right, and below. It was the home of Bernard Sullivan and is still in the family. It is a modified form of the “American foursquare” house … Continue reading 26 Manning Street, the Sullivan house (1927)
Ipswich MA Town Hall on Green Street 30 Green Street, the Ipswich Town Hall (1935) - A large jail/insane asylum was built on the Green Street location in 1828. It was torn down in 1934 to make room for a new high school. The building now serves as the Ipswich Town Hall. The prison workhouse still stands and was remodeled into a modern senior residence center known as Whipple Riverview Place. From the 1929 … Continue reading 30 Green Street, the Ipswich Town Hall (1935)
411 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA 411 Linebrook Rd. (1938) - According to a previous owner, the house was built in 1938 to resemble the house at 419 Linebrook. It therefore incorporates similar features of the Greek Revival Vernacular style as the story-and-one-third configuration, the small square windows on the second level, and an Ashier Benjamin-inspired doorway . Source: MACRIS
8 Liberth St., Ipswich MA 8 Liberty Street, colonial revival cape (1938) - This 1938 Cape at 8 Liberty St. is the newest house on the street, built in 1938 on the stone foundation of an earlier house owned by J. Russell, according to the 1910 Ipswich map. Concrete walls were poured around that foundation, expanding it to a width of 30″ – 36″. A coal-fired boiler dated … Continue reading 8 Liberty Street, colonial revival cape (1938)
27 Kimball Avenue Tudor Revival (1945) - The Tudor home at 27 Kimball Avenue was constructed in 1945 and is an extraordinary late example of the Tudor Revival Period (1880–1940).  The Tudor Revival style drew from medieval English architecture and was ignited by William Morris, a promoter of the British Arts and Crafts movement in the late nineteenth century. The form was based … Continue reading 27 Kimball Avenue Tudor Revival (1945)
Tedford's Lumber Ipswich MA 10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (est. 1946) - Tedford’s Lumber on Brown  Square got its start in 1946 when James Tedford Sr. and Bill Martin, just back from the Navy, took a portable sawmill into the woods along Linebrook and Topsfield Roads to cut timber. That winter was very tough, and the next year they decided to open a lumber yard on Brown Square, which been in business for almost … Continue reading 10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (est. 1946)
1 Meeting House Green, the First Congregational Church (1971) - First Congregational Church. When the Winthrop group of thirteen settlers came to Ipswich, “upon ascending the hill above the river they found an outcropping ledge of goodly extent, forming a sort of natural platform, and upon this rock they built their church.” This is the sixth church on this spot. The previous historic Gothic Revival church … Continue reading 1 Meeting House Green, the First Congregational Church (1971)
61 Market St., Ipswich MA 61 Market Street, formerly the Damon Block (1982) - The brick building at 61 Market Street on the corner with Depot Square was built in 1982 and is owned by Market Street LLC. This is the third commercial building at that location, after the previous ones were destroyed by fires. The corner lot on the Topsfield Road and Bridge Street (as Washington Street was … Continue reading 61 Market Street, formerly the Damon Block (1982)