3 Candlewood Rd., the Brown-Whipple house (1812)

3 Candlewood Rd., Ipswich MA
3 Candlewood Rd., the James Brown-Whipple house

The house at 3 Candlewood Rd. is part of the Candlewood Golf Course property. Early in the history of the town, this lot was in the possession of Thomas Burnham and his heirs, and came into the possession of the Brown family, which had extensive holdings in Candlewood. Joseph Brown built this house in 1812 as a dwelling for his son, James. The property came into the possession of James’ daughter Martha, and her husband Harvey Whipple in 1852, and has remained in the Whipple family.

The information below is from “Candlewood, an Ancient Neighborhood” by Thomas Franklin Waters (1908):

The estate of Thomas Burnham 4th was conveyed at his death to his son, Thomas, which was sold by Thomas to his son James Burnham, a cooper, Nov. 10, 1783 (142: 19). This deed conveyed 26 acres on the south side of the road. A 4 acre meadow was apportioned to Daniel Cogswell, July 23, 1819 (Exec. No. 3: 156) and to Langley Brown March 2, 1821 (Exec. No. 3: 289). William Cogswell and others, heirs of Daniel Brown, sold to Harvey Whipple, March 24, 1866 (923: 46).

During his ownership of the 26 acre lot, James Burnham had sold a half acre to Elisha Brown, which he used as a brickyard, and 2 acres to Nehemiah Brown, Sept. 17, 1792 (155: 166). After John Willet’s death his heirs sold to Joseph Brown. Moses, son of John Willet, sold him 10 acres, abutting on Daniel Brown’s brickyard and Joshua Burnham sold him the remainder, 14 acres, bounded south by “Candlewood St. so called,” reserving the land on which the Candlewood School stood. Both deeds were drawn on April 1, 1812 (198: 264).

Mr. Joseph Brown built the house, as a dwelling for his son, James, probably that same year (1812) , and sold him the house and 3 acres, Dec. 23, 1817. The whole property eventually came to him. D. F. Brown and the other heirs sold their interest to Harvey Whipple, who had married Martha P., daughter of James Brown, July 3, 1852 (463: 116). The heirs of Harvey Whipple still occupied the property and house when Waters wrote the book (1915), continuing into the 21st Century.

The I832 Ipswich map shows the James Brown house and the Candlewood school.

The Candlewood School

Benjamin Brown owned the west side of the road and gave this to his son, David (June 13, 1809. Pro. Rec. 378 128). David Brown bestowed a building and the residue of the estate to the Town of Ipswich for the purpose of erecting a school:

“I give, devise and bequeath for the purpose of supporting a school for the small children in the school district, where I now live, in the summer season and I do order and direct that the improvement of the aforesaid property be expended for the above purpose, and that the property aforesaid be under the sole care and direction of my executor, hereafter named and the two oldest selectmen of the town of Ipswich . . . and if the improvement of the above interest shall be more than sufficient for a common school, what remains to go toward supporting a school in the winter season and so to continue as above, annually and forever.” (proved June 4, 1822. Pro. Rec. 399: 502). 

A building that sat on a small lot and an additional 15 acres were included in the bequest. The Candlewood School annually provided education services to up to 60 Children

At a Probate Court, April 5, 1870, the trustees were authorized to sell the real estate to Harvey Whipple (Pro. Rec. 426: 447), . On February 5, 1872, A small lot, 36 ft. front, 40 ft. deep a little south of the dwelling was bought of Harvey Whipple by the Town of Ipswich, and a new school house was erected, facing Candlewood Road (846 : 136).

In 1905, the Candlewood School was moved to Manning Street to ease the burden of overcrowding, at a cost of $500. The interest from the fund created by the sale of the land was used in providing transportation for the children of the Candlewood neighborhood to the schools in the center of the Town.

Still referred to as the “Candlewood School,” at the new location, the small building was considered by the school committee to be inadequate, too small and too expensive. The school was discontinued in 1921. The building was sold, and is the existing private residence at 17 Manning St.

Map of early settlers of Candlewood, from “Candlewood, an Ancient Neighborhood ” by Thomas Franklin Waters

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