According to Harold Perley of Linebrook, this house was built by his grandfather David Tullar Perley. The house was built between 1847 when Perley first began to purchase land in Linebrook and 1856 when it was shown on the map. Construction may have coincided with D.T. Perley’s marriage in 1851. Perley became the largest cattle broker in the county and the richest man in Linebrook. He built the fine Victorian house and barn at 387 Linebrook Rd.

The building is among the most carefully finished of the Greek Revival cottages in Linebrook. It is the only one to be oriented with gable end toward the street in allusion to the temple form and the only one to incorporate Gothic Revival features (steep roof pitch and peaked molding over second-story window). Greek Revival details include the corner pilasters, a broad frieze and recessed entry with a pedimented frontispiece. Note also that the window caps are slightly peaked. The building exhibits the same simple but self-assured Greek Revival styling (with a hint of Gothic) as the Linebrook Church next door.

393 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA
Photo from the MACRIS site, 1983.

The Linebrook Church, this house and two others were nominated as a National Register Historic District in 1984. Anne Grady wrote for the Ipswich Historical Commission, “The Linebrook Church and the four houses along the same side of Linebrook Road east and west of it form an intact 19th century grouping with no intrusions. The houses include the Country Federal house at the easternmost end of the area, the richly-ornamented Queen Anne dwelling next west, the Greek Revival cottage with a hint of Gothic just west of the church, and the simpler cottage with doorway drawn from Asher Benjamin’s Practice of Architecture (1833) at the west end of the area. The houses form a period setting for the church which is the major focal point of outer Linebrook.”

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