The home of farmer and local deacon, Jacob Symonds Potter, from before 1856 until after 1872, this property is near the site of several earlier Potter homesteads and Potter’s brook. Together, these evince the continued presence of the Potter family in South Linebrook from the 17th through the 19th centuries. Potters were active in petitions to be set off to Topsfield in the early 18th century and in the formation of the Linebrook church in 1746. Jacob Potter moved to Georgetown after 1872. Several of his sisters married into Linebrook families, but the Potter name disappeared from Linebrook by 1888. The property passed before 1888 to Robert C Le Favour, a farmer. By 1910 F.W. Forness was the owner.

One of half a dozen or more story-and-one-third cottages in the Greek Revival style in Linebrook, this building is the most elaborately embellished. Decorative features include a simple Greek Revival frontispiece (altered later by a row of scalloped dentils below the cornice), an extremely broad frieze at the cornice (echoing an equally broad frieze in the frontispiece), plain corner pilasters and pedimented window heads. The barn which appears to date from the late 19th century retains a period ventilator on the roof.

Sources

  • MACRIS
  • Waters, Thomas Franklin. Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Volume II. Ipswich: Ipswich Historical Society, 1917
  • 1832, 1856 maps 1872, 1910 atlases
  • Perley, Martin Van Buren. “Linebrook Militia No. 18.” Ipswich Chronicle, Sept. 2, 1910.

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