Search results for ‘candlewood

Candlewood, an Ancient Neighborhood in Ipswich, with genealogies of John Brown, William Fellows and Robert Kinsman

Candlewood Road

“Why and when the name was given is largely a matter of conjecture. Pastor Higginson of Salem wrote to friends in England of the primitive way in which the earliest settlers often lighted their houses by burning thin strips of the pitch pine trees. The suggestion is natural […]

The Miles River in Hamilton

The Miles River

Known in Colonial times as Mile Brook, the Miles River is a major tributary of the Ipswich River but has been diminished in volume by upstream use as a water supply. Evidence of the old Potter and Appleton mills can still be found near County Rd.

Laughing Lion gift shop Ipswich MA

Ipswich Pine

There is a local tradition that the wood stain known as Ipswich Pine originated with Carman Woodworking, which operated behind the Laughing Lion gift shop on Essex Road and specialized in Early American pine reproductions.

Historic houses of Ipswich

Search houses by historic district or street address. Information is from “Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony,” by Thomas Franklin Waters; Susan Nelson’s inventory for the Ipswich Historical Commission; and the Ipswich inventory on the MACRIS site.

Manning Street from the 1893 Birdeye Map of Ipswich.

Manning Street, a Victorian neighborhood

Central Street was laid out in 1872, and Manning Street in 1882. Manning Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, newly created, with no houses yet. The 1910 Ipswich map shows all of the houses now on the street, and Warren Street has been extended from North Main to Manning Street. 

Ipswich at MACRIS

MACRIS is the Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System. The following houses are from a search of Ipswich structures in the collected files. Go to MACRIS to view the complete list of structures. Inv. Property Name Street Year IPS.A Ipswich Village IPS.B Damon Farm II IPS.C Linden Street Mansards […]

Every house has a story

Sources: Susan Nelson’s detailed listing of First and Second Period houses in Ipswich for the Ipswich Historical Commission Margaret E. Welden, Ipswich Historical Commission, historic house inventories, 1978. Partial List of Historic Buildings in Ipswich, MA, compiled 2006 by Susan Nelson, Goodship Research. (PDF download) Ipswich In The […]

Mary Conley Award

Every year the Ipswich Historical Commission presents the Mary P. Conley Preservation Award to the owners of an Ipswich property noteworthy for a recent restoration. or to a person that has made a significant contribution to the preservation of Ipswich history.

The Choate Bridge in Ipswich, photo by George Dexter

Battles of the bridges

Excerpts from Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, by Thomas Franklin Waters The stone bridges which span the Ipswich river with their graceful arches are picturesque and interesting, but the readiness with which the Town proceeded to build the latter two stone bridges is in singular contrast with […]

1910 Ipswich Census

1910 Ipswich census and maps

The 121 handwritten 1910 Federal Census survey forms for Ipswich provide a wealth of information about the population of Ipswich during its greatest period of industrial growth, which included the arrival of hundreds of immigrants to work in the Ipswich Mills. Survey forms for Ipswich are provided through Archive.org. The lists below […]

Lords Square

Lords Square was known as Brewer’s Corner in early Ipswich. John Brewer was a town clerk and being on what was then the outskirts of town owned a large lot, which he divided into sections and sold. Brewer’s First Period home at 82 High Street was built in […]

Names of the Ipswich slaves

In 1641 the Massachusetts Bay Colony adopted a code of laws that made slavery legal. In 1755, the slaves in this town above the age of sixteen numbered sixty-two, but within ten years, public opinion began turn against slavery. In 1780, the present Constitution of Massachusetts was adopted, its first article asserting that all men are born free and equal.