Search results for ‘candlewood

3 Candlewood Rd., Ipswich MA

3 Candlewood Rd., the Brown-Whipple house (1812)

Joseph Brown built this house in 1812 as a dwelling for his son, James, and sold him the house and 3 acres, Dec. 23, 1817. The entire estate of Joseph Brown eventually was inherited by James. In 1852, D. F. Brown and the other heirs sold their interest to Hervey Whipple, who had married Martha P., daughter of James Brown, July 3, 1852. The heirs of Hervey Whipple still occupied into the 21st Century.

Mary P. Conley award

Every year since 1992, the IHC presents the Mary P. Conley Preservation Award, named in honor of Mary for her endless dedication to preserving historical sites. The award may be given to the owners of an Ipswich property which is deemed noteworthy for a recent restoration or general improvement. The […]

Lords Square

Lords Square is not a square at all, and no one knows if it’s Lords Square or Lord Square. The bewildering commercial intersection abuts the Old North Burying Ground and the largest collection of First Period houses in America.

One Third for the Widow

Under Puritan law an adult unmarried woman was a feme sole, and could own property and sign contracts. A married woman was a feme covert and could not own property individually. Widows regained the status of feme sole but the Right of Dower entitled them to keep only one third of their property. When a woman was left a widow some men like vultures were ready to take the other two thirds.

Names of the Ipswich slaves

In 1641 the Massachusetts Bay Colony adopted a code of laws that made slavery legal. In 1755, the slaves in this town above the age of sixteen numbered sixty-two, but within ten years, public opinion began turn against slavery. In 1780, the present Constitution of Massachusetts was adopted, its first article asserting that all men are born free and equal.

Ipswich at MACRIS

MACRIS is the Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System. The following houses are from a search of Ipswich structures in the collected files. Go to MACRIS to view the complete list of structures. Inv. Property Name Street Year IPS.A Ipswich Village IPS.B Damon Farm II IPS.C Linden Street Mansards […]

The Miles River in Hamilton

The Miles River

Known in Colonial times as Mile Brook, the Miles River is a major tributary of the Ipswich River but has been diminished in volume by upstream use as a water supply. Evidence of the old Potter and Appleton mills can still be found near County Rd.

Ipswich MA sale of a Negro girl slave named Patience

Her name was Patience

“Know all men by these presents I, Thomas Burnam of Ipswich, do by these presents bargain, sell, sett over and confirm unto the said Robert Dodge, a negro girl known by the name of Patience…To have and to hold said negro girl Patience during her natural life.”

Laughing Lion gift shop Ipswich MA

Ipswich Pine

There is a local tradition that the wood stain known as Ipswich Pine originated with Carman Woodworking, which operated behind the Laughing Lion gift shop on Essex Road and specialized in Early American pine reproductions.

Historic houses of Ipswich

Search houses by historic district or street address. Information is from “Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony,” by Thomas Franklin Waters; Susan Nelson’s inventory for the Ipswich Historical Commission; and the Ipswich inventory on the MACRIS site.

Manning Street from the 1893 Birdeye Map of Ipswich.

Manning Street, a Victorian neighborhood

Central Street was laid out in 1872, and Manning Street in 1882. Manning Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, newly created, with no houses yet. The 1910 Ipswich map shows all of the houses now on the street, and Warren Street has been extended from North Main to Manning Street. 

31 Washington Street, the George Brown house (1883)

John A. Brown sold this lot to George B. Brown in 1883 and he built a house shortly thereafter. Brown’s house is one of the few Stick Style Victorian homes in Ipswich. Brown built a grist mill, also located on Washington St., in 1881. He started with a single team and by 1888 employed 6 men. Brown was the first in the area to install a roller mill, which removed all foreign iron substances from the grain before it entered the mill