Austin Measures house, Turkey Shore Road, Ipswich MA
The Austin Measures house on Turkey Shore road

The Austin Measures house at 49 Turkey Shore Road is believed to have been built in 1874. The low-pitched roof, window hoods and corbels supporting the flat roof portico are of Italianate influence.

The 1900 Census records that Austin Measures was born in England in 1835. He immigrated to the U.S., married Lucy W. from Maine, and settled in Ipswich. The census lists one son, Daniel W. Measures, born in 1882. Daniel lived in Ipswich, was a member of the Masons and the Ipswich Historical Society. Records show that in 1944 he purchased a house in Epson NH, but owned it for only two years.

In the 19th and early 20th Century, Ipswich village maps showed the names of the owners of each property. The 1884 Birdseye Map includes sketches of each house. I used these maps to confirm the construction period of the Austin Measures house.

49 Turkey Shore Rd., Ipswich MA
The house at 49 Turkey Shore Road is indicated by a white arrow in this closeup view from the 1884 Ipswich Birdseye map
Closeup from the 1872 Ipswich village map, indicates that the house at 49 Turkey Shore Rd. had not yet been built.
Closeup from the 1872 Ipswich village map indicates that the house at 49 Turkey Shore Rd. had not yet been built.
1884 map Ipswich Turkey Shore Rd.
The 1884 Ipswich village map shows the house at 49 Turkey Shore Rd, owned by “A. Measures.” At that time, Turkey Shore Rd. had been renamed Prospect St., but it was later changed back.
Closeup from the 1910 Ipswich village map.
This closeup from the 1910 Ipswich village map shows the house at 49 Turkey Shore Rd is owned by W. S. Shephard. Dianne Fessenden-Cassidy informs us that the Sheppard-Fessenden family owned this property throughout the 20th Century. At the intersection of Turkey Shore and Green Streets is the Emerson-Howard house, which was where Ipswich artist Arthur Wesley Dow hosted a summer art school.  Structures with an X are outbuildings. The two bungalows on either side of the Austin Measures house had not yet been built.

Austin Measures’ Candy Shop was a long-lasting institution in Ipswich. It was first located in a small building on North Main Street that was moved in order to construct the Colonial Building in 1904. It moved to a Central Street location that now houses the Subway.

Measures Candy shop was originally located in the small building on N. Main St., which was torn down to erect the Colonial Building in .1904.
Measures Candy shop was originally located in the small building on N. Main St., which was torn down to erect the Colonial Building in 1904.
The second Austin Measures’ Candy Shop is on the left on Central Street
This photo is taken from about the same time as the one above, judging by the electric lighting.
Inside Measures’ Candy Store on Central St.
The Austin Measures house before it was restored in 2002.
The Austin Measures house before it was restored in 2002.

Bungalow neighbors

51 Turkey Shore Rd., Ipswich
51 Turkey Shore Rd., Ipswich

To the left in the photo above you can see one of two nearly identical homes at 43 and 51 Turkey Shore Road, sharing a common driveway with the Austin Measures house. The Ipswich 1884 map shows their locations as part of the Measures property. Diane Fessenden-Cassidy informs us that they were built by her great grandfather in the early 20th Century. Her family continued to live in the house at 49 Turkey Shore Rd. until 2002. The huge oak tree in front of the house was planted by her grandparents.

The two small houses were built in the Bungalow Porch Style, which was an eastern adaptation out of California’s Arts and Crafts movement. The expansive front porch opens the living room to the yard, forming a connection between the home and a view of the river. Prominent round columns and wide window casings on the porch make it an architectural transition to the outdoors. The style is similar to folk houses in the warmer U.S. south.

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