9 County Street, the Benjamin Dutch house (1705)

9 County Street, the Benjamin Dutch house (1705)

The Ipswich Historical Commission inventory states, “The early ownership of this property is unclear, but it was part of Benjamin Dutch’s estate, and probably was owned by him in the late 17th century. A house was on the lot by 1714, and occupied by Dutch’s daughter and son-in-law. Though most of the trim on the house is Federal in character, ceratin first period features remain that suggest the present house was begun in Benjamin Dutch’s time. Framing elements from that period are visible, and both butterfly and strap hinges can be found.

Benjamin Dutch was born in 1664 to Robert Dutch and Mary Kimball. Benjamin married Elizabeth Baker and had one child. This Benjamin Dutch appeared to have died in his late 20’s, but records are unclear. His widow Elizabeth then married John Appleton, and he had a son named Benjamin born in 1702. Another Benjamin Dutch, possibly the son of the former, was born in 1680 and died in 1760. Yet another Benjamin Dutch was born in 1719.

This house at 9 County St. was built early in the 1700’s, and was owned by (probably the second) Benjamin Dutch who owned and sold several properties in the area of North Main and is listed as a Taverner. The house is timber frame, 2 stories with end gables an ells on the side and rear. The front facade is asymmetrical.

A grandson of Benjamin Dutch, Nathaniel, heard a blind man’s poem dedicating the Choate Bridge and was able to recite it to be recorded over 50 years later.
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Sources:

  • MACRIS
  • T.F. Waters, Ipswich in the Mass. Bay Colony, vol. I, p. 416

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