1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich

The Central Street Victorian neighborhood

Concerns are being raised throughout Ipswich regarding state-mandated density zoning and concentrated multi-family developments that are affecting the historic neighborhoods of Ipswich and other areas of town. The Ipswich Historical Commission and the Architectural Preservation District Commission (APDC) are working on updates to the APD bylaw, and possible zoning amendments to be presented to the Special Town Meeting in fall of 2021.

While the four traditional neighborhoods on the National Register of Historic Places are included in the APD, the adjoining 19th Century neighborhood that includes Central, Manning, Mineral, Liberty, Maple, Brown and Washington Streets remains vulnerable. Residents of that neighborhood have requested that it be added to the Architectural Preservation District. The Historical Commission intends to offer an article to that effect at the fall Town Meeting, but will need widespread support from residents for it to be successful.

Central Street Birdseye map of Ipswich
Closeup from the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich showing the Central and Washington Streets neighborhood. Click on the map to view a larger image.
Proposed addition to Architectural Preservation District
Wetlands surrounding Farley Brook into the 19th Century, superimposed on a current day map.
Wetlands surrounding Farley Brook into the 19th Century, superimposed on a current day map.

In the first two centuries after Ipswich was settled, much of the land between Washington and High Streets was a wetland with Farley’s Brook running through it.

After the railroad came to Ipswich in 1839, the center of commerce moved from North Main Street to Market Street, and marked the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The population of Ipswich swelled as immigrants came to work in the mills.

Worker housing was constructed in Pole Alley and former farmland creating the Mount Pleasant neighborhood, and are recognized in the National Register of Historic Places, along with High St., the East End, the South Green and Meeting House Green.

Central Street, Ipswich MA
Central St. Google maps street view

Central Street

In the 1872 Ipswich map, Central Street had just been constructed. Manning High School opened two years later, and stores began to be constructed. Ipswich Town Reports during the second half of the 19th Century show payments for hauling gravel from the now-depleted gravel pits near Washington St. and Topsfield Rd. The Town experienced a building boom, and by 1884, the Victorian neighborhoods that line Central, Hammatt, Manning, Mineral, Brown, Cottage and Liberty Streets had been created. This distinctive Ipswich neighborhood is includes historic houses and streets, but has not received historic designation.

The 1872 map of Ipswich shows Central Street still unnamed and unpopulated.
The 1872 Ipswich map shows Central Street still unnamed and unpopulated.
1884 Ipswich map
Section from the 1884 Ipswich map showing the new Central Street neighborhood
1910 Ipswich map
The 1910 Ipswich map shows how the neighborhood continued to fill in during the late 19th Century.
Most of the houses in the map above were built in the last half of the 19th Century, and includes Brown, Central, Cottage Liberty, Manning, Maple, Mineral, and Washington Streets.

Central Street

83 Central Street, the International House (1866) - In 1866 the International House was built by the Eastern Railroad beside the Ipswich Depot. It was moved in 1882 to make room for a new depot. It continued to be operated as a hotel, and In the 1970's and 80's was known as the House of Hinlin.… Continue reading 83 Central Street, the International House (1866)
Isaac J. Potter house, 82 Central Street, Ipswich MA 82 Central St., the Isaac J. Potter house (b 1884) - This house was the home of Isaac J. Potter, editor of the Ipswich Chronicle, who became the paper's sole proprietor.… Continue reading 82 Central St., the Isaac J. Potter house (b 1884)
Tyler Building, Ipswich MA 2 Central Street, the Tyler Building (1906) - The Tyler Building, was the last commercial block on Central Street to be constructed after the 1894 Central Street fire. It was the home of Tyler's Department Store and Quint's Drugs.… Continue reading 2 Central Street, the Tyler Building (1906)
Memorial Building, Central Street Ipswich MA 33 Central Street, Memorial Hall (1921) - In 1921 the Memorial Building was built in memory of Ipswich Veterans. The long stairs from Central Street were difficult. The town sold the building to a non-profit corporation in 2003 and the building was renovated into affordable elderly housing.… Continue reading 33 Central Street, Memorial Hall (1921)
38 Central Street, Ipswich MA 38 Central Street, the Measures building (c 1900) - Austin Measures built this after the Central Street fire of 1894. Measures' Candy Shop was a long-lasting institution that began in a small small building on North Main Street. The building was taken down in 1904 to construct the Colonial Building, and he reopened in this Central Street location.… Continue reading 38 Central Street, the Measures building (c 1900)
The Ipswich Fire Department building on Central Street was built for horse-drawn fire trucks 55 Central Street, Central Fire Station (1907) - Constructed for horse-drawn equipment in 1908, this building has served for over a century as the Ipswich fire station.… Continue reading 55 Central Street, Central Fire Station (1907)
88 Central Street, Ipswich MA 88 Central Street, the W. L. Johnson house (c 1880) - The W. L. Johnson house is the most ambitious Mansard on Central St., and preserves original decorative detailing. A matching carriage house also survives.… Continue reading 88 Central Street, the W. L. Johnson house (c 1880)
107 Central Street, Ipswich MA 107 Central Street, the Collins house (c 1880) - This rambling double house is trimmed with characteristic Queen Anne finery. The entrance porches are decorated with turned posts, balusters, and spindle screens. Elaborate rising sun motifs in both gables, eave brackets, and staggered butt shingles in the bays complete the design.… Continue reading 107 Central Street, the Collins house (c 1880)
108 Central Street, Ipswich MA 108 Central Street, the George W. Baker house (1872) - 108 Central Street is one of three identical houses along this stretch of Central Street. George W. Baker, who served in the Civil War from February, 1962 until August, 1865 occupied the house after its construction.… Continue reading 108 Central Street, the George W. Baker house (1872)
92 Central St., the Abbie G. Lord house, 1871 - The house at 90 Central St., was constructed after Andrew Geyer purchased the lot from Amos Smith in 1869. He sold the finished house to Abbie G. Lord in 1873, who sold to Maria J. Brown in 1897.… Continue reading 92 Central St., the Abbie G. Lord house, 1871
101 Central Street 101 Central Street, Newton house (c 1900) - This house first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map on the same lot with the house in front, labeled, “Mrs. Newton.” Sources:
109 Central Street 109 Central Street, Daniel and Mary Collins house (1873) - The house at 109 Central St. appears in the 1884 Ipswich map as “Collins,” and is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Daniel Collins deeded the house to his “loving daughter” Mary Collins in 1887.  The “parcel of land” “on the new road” was conveyed by Nathan Jewett to Dan Collins on August 16,… Continue reading 109 Central Street, Daniel and Mary Collins house (1873)
110 Central Street 110 Central Street, the Samuel Baker house (before 1884) - Three identical houses with mansard roofs appear in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map and are still standing. The 1884 Ipswich map shows this house owned by “S. H. Baker” and the one next door owned by “G. H. Baker.” Samuel Baker and other parties conveyed “a certain parcel of land” in 1894 to Chebacco Associates.… Continue reading 110 Central Street, the Samuel Baker house (before 1884)
111 Central Street 111 Central Street, the Albert and Annie Garland house (1894) - The house at 111 Central St. first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as A. S. Garland. Albert J. Garland, Edward Lord and Edward Baxter received a mortgage for the lot “with a new building thereon” in 1894 (Book 1432, page 305). Henry Garland was the owner of the house in 1934… Continue reading 111 Central Street, the Albert and Annie Garland house (1894)
44 Central Street 44 Central St., the Ellen V. Lang house (c 1885) - The 1884 Ipswich map shows a house set back from Central St., belonging to “Mrs. Wildes.” In 1888, The Agawam Manual and Directory by M.V. B. Perley, shows the following residences: This house is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. The 1910 Ipswich map shows this house belonging to “Mrs. Lang.” In 1887 Ellen… Continue reading 44 Central St., the Ellen V. Lang house (c 1885)
79 Central Street 79 Central Street, the Foster Russell Jr. house (1883) - John Cogswell sold this lot without a house for $300 to Augustus Russell and Foster Russell Jr. in 1883 (book 1110, page 078). This house appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map; the 1884 and 1910 Ipswich maps show the owner of the house as Foster Russell Jr. The owner in the 1910 map is… Continue reading 79 Central Street, the Foster Russell Jr. house (1883)
80 Central Street 80 Central Street, the Malachi Nolan house (1877) - Dr. Asabel Wildes sold three small lots to Malachi Nolan who appears to have build this house in 1877. His daughter Mary Marshall sold the combined lots with the building to Charles A Sayward in 1911.… Continue reading 80 Central Street, the Malachi Nolan house (1877)
91 Central Street 91 Central Street, the Sylvanius and Mary Canney house (c 1866) - The house at this location first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map under the name "S. F. Canney." Sylvanius F. Canney purchased the lot in 1866, and sold the house and land to Israel Jewett in 1869.  … Continue reading 91 Central Street, the Sylvanius and Mary Canney house (c 1866)
98 Central Street 98 Central Street, the William and Abigail Haskell house (b 1884) - This house first appears under the name William Haskell in the 1884 Ipswich map.The house is shown as “A. Damon” in the 1910 map. It is also shown in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich.
87 Central St., Ipswich MA 87 Central Street (c 1890) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 87 Central Street as"Misses Peatsfield." The house is almost identical in construction to the house at 89 Central Street, which is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map.… Continue reading 87 Central Street (c 1890)
35 Central St., Ipswich MA 35 Central St., the Caldwell-Copp house - The Oak Hill apartments building at 35 Central Street was constructed in 1880 by Joel Caldwell. In 1891, Margaret and Lydia Caldwell sold the property to Carlton and Harriett Copp.… Continue reading 35 Central St., the Caldwell-Copp house

Brown Square and Granite Street

2 Brewery Place (Brown Square) Ipswich Ale Brewery (c 1900) - The Burke Shoe Heel factory burned on June 19, 1933, but this wing survived the fire, and is today the Ipswich Ale Brewery. It was the home of Saffron Brothers, the exclusive suppliers of clams to the Howard Johnson chain for 32 years.… Continue reading 2 Brewery Place (Brown Square) Ipswich Ale Brewery (c 1900)
Tedford's Lumber Ipswich MA 10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (1933) - Tedford's Lumber on Brown Square got its start in 1946 when James Tedford Sr. and Bill Martin, just back from the Navy, took a portable sawmill into the woods to cut timber. The next year they decided to open a lumber yard on Brown Square.… Continue reading 10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (1933)
19 Brown Square 19 Brown Square (1903) - Harold Bowen wrote that this building was constructed from bricks that were saved from where the parking lot is now for the Ipswich Inn opposite N. Main st.… Continue reading 19 Brown Square (1903)


Brown Street

8 Brown Street, the Timothy Carey house 8 Brown Street, Timothy Carey house (1890) - The house is typical of the Liberty/Brown/Mineral/Washington Street “folk victorian” homes built at the end of the 19th Century, often from plans available through architectural magazines. The style in Ipswich was generally L-shaped with a porch and brackets under the gable, and mass-produced prefabricated trim.… Continue reading 8 Brown Street, Timothy Carey house (1890)
10 Brown Street, Ipswich MA 10 Brown Street, Essex Hosiery Company worker housing (c 1900) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown and Mineral Streets.… Continue reading 10 Brown Street, Essex Hosiery Company worker housing (c 1900)
12 Brown St. 12 Brown St. (c 1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.… Continue reading 12 Brown St. (c 1890)
14 Brown St. 14 Brown St., Mitchell-Ralph house (c 1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.… Continue reading 14 Brown St., Mitchell-Ralph house (c 1890)
16 Brown St. 16 Brown St., the Leno house (1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.… Continue reading 16 Brown St., the Leno house (1890)

Hammatt Street

10 Hammatt St., the old South Church Vestry (1857) - This house was originally the Vestry for the South Church, and sat on South Main Street near the South Green. It was moved to its current location and converted into a two-family dwelling.… Continue reading 10 Hammatt St., the old South Church Vestry (1857)

Liberty Street

14 Liberty Street, the George B. Brown house (1898) 14 Liberty Street, the George B. Brown house (1898) - The elegant Victorian house at 14 Liberty Street in Ipswich was built between 1896-98 by George B. Brown, who owned a grain mill on Washington Street.… Continue reading 14 Liberty Street, the George B. Brown house (1898)
Liberty St. Gothic Revival house, Ipswich 11 Liberty Street, the Levi Howe house (c 1870) - The descendants of Levi L. Howe, a farmer, owned this Gothic Revival cottage until 1953. Ken Savoie restored its appearance, and was the winner of the 1992 Mary Conley Award for historic preservation.… Continue reading 11 Liberty Street, the Levi Howe house (c 1870)
Liberty Street - In the late 19th Century Washington Street was extended to Linebrook Road, and Liberty Street became its own street. Its houses date to 1850-1910.… Continue reading Liberty Street
3 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 3 Liberty St., the Foster house (c 1880) - This house is shown in the 1872 and 1884 Ipswich maps owned by "S. Foster."… Continue reading 3 Liberty St., the Foster house (c 1880)
6 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 6 Liberty St. (c. 1890) - A house at 6 Liberty St. is shown in the 1893 Birdseye map and the 1910 Ipswich map, the owner is shown as "C. Caldwell." The modestly Italianate "Gable and Ell" form confirm the architectural period.… Continue reading 6 Liberty St. (c. 1890)
7 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 7 Liberty St., the John W. and Annie M. Lord house (C 1867) - The house at 7 Liberty St. first appears in the 1872. and was first owned by John W. Lord and his wife Annie M. Pingree.… Continue reading 7 Liberty St., the John W. and Annie M. Lord house (C 1867)
9 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 9 Liberty St. (c. 1880) - This house first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as "Mrs. Foster." It is also shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map, but not in the 1872 map. The owner in the 1910 Ipswich map is T. H. Lord. … Continue reading 9 Liberty St. (c. 1880)
12 Liberty St. 12 Liberty St., Charles Brown house (c 1890) - The earliest Identified owner is Charles E. Brown, proprietor who owned the house by 1910. Brown and his son, Walter 6. Brown, operated a brick manufactory and contracting company.… Continue reading 12 Liberty St., Charles Brown house (c 1890)
13 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 13 Liberty St., the Roberts house (c 1900) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 13 Liberty St. as D. A. Roberts.… Continue reading 13 Liberty St., the Roberts house (c 1900)
15 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 15 Liberty St. (c 1870) - The earliest identified owner is C.W. Davis who owned the house by 1872. By 1884 the house had been sold to John W. Russell, a freight agent, who continued to own the house into the 1920’s.… Continue reading 15 Liberty St. (c 1870)
17 Liberty St., Ipswich 17 Liberty St., the Blaisdell house (c 1870) - The 1872 Ipswich map shows the owner of this house as "L. Blaisdell."… Continue reading 17 Liberty St., the Blaisdell house (c 1870)
18 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 18 Liberty St. (1885) - The houses at #16 and # 18 Liberty Street were built between 1884 and 1887 by John A. Brown, a brick manufacturer and lumber dealer, probably in association with C.E. Brown & Son.… Continue reading 18 Liberty St. (1885)
10 Liberty Street 10 Liberty St., the Brown house (c 1900) - The house at 10 Center Street is not in the 1884 Ipswich map, but appears in the 1910 Ipswich map under the name "C. Brown."… Continue reading 10 Liberty St., the Brown house (c 1900)

Linebrook Road

5 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA 5 Linebrook Rd., the Richard Lane house (1851) - Richard Rogers Lane built the house in 1851, He died in 1858, and his only child, Etta, inherited the house. which is mentioned in the 1898 deed when she sold it to Charles W. Woodbury. … Continue reading 5 Linebrook Rd., the Richard Lane house (1851)
7 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA 7 Linebrook Rd. (1914) - The actual date of construction for the house at 7 Linebrook Rd. is unverified. There is a tradition that 5 Linebrook was originally at this location and was moved.… Continue reading 7 Linebrook Rd. (1914)
Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA 8 Linebrook Rd., the C. Chester Caldwell house - In September 1867, Joseph and Joanna Ross sold Daniel R. Caldwell this lot. … Continue reading 8 Linebrook Rd., the C. Chester Caldwell house

Manning Street

6 Manning Street, the H. K. Damon house (1890) 6 Manning Street, the H. K. Damon house (1890) - This 1890 Victorian house features a third floor porch, slate shingles, 10-foot ceilings, two stain glass windows, oak floors, original moldings and pocket doors.… Continue reading 6 Manning Street, the H. K. Damon house (1890)
26 Manning St., Ipswich 26 Manning Street, the Sullivan house (1927) - The 17th Century Caleb Lord house on the corner of High and Manning Streets was removed in 1927 and was replaced by the home of Bernard Sullivan. This is a modified form of the "American foursquare" house of the 1920's and 30's.… Continue reading 26 Manning Street, the Sullivan house (1927)
1 Manning Street, the E.H. Martin house (1880) - The E. H. Martin house originally faced Central Street. It was moved back one lot and turned to face Manning St. … Continue reading 1 Manning Street, the E.H. Martin house (1880)
Manning Street from the 1893 Birdeye Map of Ipswich. Manning Street, a Victorian neighborhood - Central Street was laid out in 1872, and Manning Street in 1882. Manning Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, newly created, with no houses yet. The 1910 Ipswich map shows all of the houses now on the street, and Warren Street has been extended from North Main to Manning Street. … Continue reading Manning Street, a Victorian neighborhood
3 Manning Street, Ipswich MA. 3 Manning St. (after 1910) - 3 Manning Street. An empty lot is shown on the 1910 Ipswich map, owned by E. W. Russell.… Continue reading 3 Manning St. (after 1910)
7 Manning St. 7 Manning St., the E W. Russell house (c 1890) -  The house at 7 Manning St. appears first in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner as E W. Russell, who worked as a dyer at the Ipswich Mills. … Continue reading 7 Manning St., the E W. Russell house (c 1890)
9 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 9 Manning St., the Albert P. Hills house (c. 1890) - Like many of the houses on Manning Street, it first appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Hills owned a grocery on North Main Street. E. W.Russell was the owner in the 1910 Ipswich map.… Continue reading 9 Manning St., the Albert P. Hills house (c. 1890)
10 Manning St., Ipswich MA 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) - 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) Like most of the houses on Manning Street, this house first appears in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich. In the 1910 Ipswich map the owner is G. Haskell.… Continue reading 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890)
12 Manning St., Ipswich MA 12 Manning Street, the Edward T. Pike house (1885) - The mortgage for this house was taken out in 1885. Almost all of the houses on Manning Street appear in the 1893 Ipswich map. … Continue reading 12 Manning Street, the Edward T. Pike house (1885)
13 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 13 Manning St., the Fields house, (c. 1900) - 13 Manning St., is owned by “Mrs. Fields” in the 1910 map. The town assessors database gives the date of construction as 1870. However, the 1884 Ipswich map shows no houses yet constructed on the street, which had not even been added in the 1872 map.… Continue reading 13 Manning St., the Fields house, (c. 1900)
14 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 14 Manning Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Manning Street does not appear in the 1910 Ipswich map, but based on the architectural characteristics in common with other houses on the street is presumed to have been constructed shortly thereafter.… Continue reading 14 Manning Street (c 1915)
15 Manning St., Ipswich MA 15 Manning Street (c 1920) - The Ipswich assessors database provides a date of 1920 for this house.… Continue reading 15 Manning Street (c 1920)
16 Manning st., Ipswich MA 16 Manning St. (c 1900) - 16 Manning St., circa 1900. G. A. Lord owned this house, another one house next door and one on High St.… Continue reading 16 Manning St. (c 1900)
17 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 17 Manning Street, the Candlewood School (1856) (moved to this location) - Records indicate that the 1856 schoolhouse on Candlewood Road was moved to this location and enlarged in 1905 to relieve overcrowding in the original Winthrop School. . The form of construction predates the Victorian style of the other houses on the street.… Continue reading 17 Manning Street, the Candlewood School (1856) (moved to this location)
18 Manning Street 20 Manning Street (1902) - 18-20 Manning St. is believed to have been constructed in 1902 and was owned by G. A. Lord in the 1910 Ipswich map. A different structure is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map.… Continue reading 20 Manning Street (1902)
21 Manning St., Ipswich MA 21 Manning Street - The date of construction for this house is uncertain. The Ipswich assessors database shows the date of construction as 1990.  The 1893 Ipswich birdseye map and 1910 map shows show a utilitarian structure at this location, which may have been converted or a new house placed on an older foundation.… Continue reading 21 Manning Street
23 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 23 Manning Street (1934) - The Ipswich Assessors database shows the date of construction as 1934.… Continue reading 23 Manning Street (1934)

Maple Avenue

Maple St., Ipswich MA 16 Maple Avenue, the William H. Bodwell house, 1890 - In 1891 this house appears on maps under the ownership of William H. Bodwell, a carpenter. … Continue reading 16 Maple Avenue, the William H. Bodwell house, 1890
Maple Ave., Ipswich MA 8 Maple Ave., the George Tozer house (circa 1890) - Maple Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, without houses. George Tozer constructed this large house when the Washington Street neighborhood section behind it was still farmland.… Continue reading 8 Maple Ave., the George Tozer house (circa 1890)
3 Maple St., Ipswich MA 3 Maple Avenue, the Harland and Blanche Burke house (1916) - Harland Burke was a superintendent at F.L. Burke & Son, heel manufacturers whose factory was at Brown Square. … Continue reading 3 Maple Avenue, the Harland and Blanche Burke house (1916)
4 Maple Ave. Ipswich MA 4 Maple Avenue, the Arthur H. and Madeline H. Tozer house (1915) - Arthur Tozer was a music teacher for the public schools and apparently worked out of his home. Prior to construction of this house, land on which it stands was part of a larger parcel belonging to G. Tozer.… Continue reading 4 Maple Avenue, the Arthur H. and Madeline H. Tozer house (1915)
5 Maple Avenue, Ipswich MA 5 Maple Avenue, the G. Baxter – Frank Campbell house (1890) - This small house features chamfered posts, brackets, and spindle friezes. The houses at 3 and 5 Newmarch Street in Ipswich are identical to 5 Maple Ave., all constructed between 1870 and 1890. … Continue reading 5 Maple Avenue, the G. Baxter – Frank Campbell house (1890)

Mineral Street

16 Mineral Street, Wise Saddle Shop (c.1742 /1801) - Jabez Farley sold this lot to Joseph and John Wise in 1801, who probably built this small dwelling shortly thereafter. As late as 1832, this was the only house on Mineral Street.… Continue reading 16 Mineral Street, Wise Saddle Shop (c.1742 /1801)
22 Mineral St. Ipswich MA 22 Mineral Street, the Warner-Harris House (c. 1696, alt. 1835) - The earliest sections of this house were built by Daniel Warner in 1696 on Market Street. In 1835, Ephraim Harris, builder, was commissioned by Capt. Robert Kimball to build a new house on the lot. Harris removed a portion of the Warner house to his own land at the corner of Central and Mineral Streets, and enlarged it.… Continue reading 22 Mineral Street, the Warner-Harris House (c. 1696, alt. 1835)
33 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 33 Mineral Street, the Caroline Norman house, 1884 (moved from Central St.) - The house at 33 Mineral Street was moved from the location of Cumberland Farms on Central street in Ipswich. … Continue reading 33 Mineral Street, the Caroline Norman house, 1884 (moved from Central St.)
17 Mineral Street Ipswich 17 Mineral St., the Baxter-Adamowicz house, c 1885 - This house is part of what was a double lot, constructed in the early 1880's by J. J Philbrook, who sold it soon thereafter to Edward H. Baxter. The Adamowitz family have owned it since 1926.… Continue reading 17 Mineral St., the Baxter-Adamowicz house, c 1885
10 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 10 Mineral Street, the W. Smith house (c 1860) - The 1872 Ipswich map and the 1884 map show a house at this location owned by "W. Smith." In the 1910 map, the owner is J. A. Smith.… Continue reading 10 Mineral Street, the W. Smith house (c 1860)
14 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 14 Mineral Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Mineral Street does not appear on the 1910 Ipswich map but was probably constructed or moved to this location soon after.… Continue reading 14 Mineral Street (c 1915)
19 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 19 Mineral Street (1856) - In 1856, Mary Lord Baker, widow of Stephen W. Baker transferred 1 1/2 acres including this lot to Mary Philbrook. The Philbrook family constructed a house on the property, which appears in the 1872 Ipswich map.… Continue reading 19 Mineral Street (1856)
20 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 20 Mineral Street, the Lucy Ackerman house (c 1870) - This house began as a story and a half Mansard cottage, with the Mineral Street wing added later. The small front mansard cottage is shown in the 1872 map with the name "Mrs. L. Ackerman,"… Continue reading 20 Mineral Street, the Lucy Ackerman house (c 1870)
23 Mineral Street 23 Mineral Street, the Lydia and Joseph Lord house (1871) - Andrew Geyer purchased the lot in 1871 and in 1873 sold the lot with a house on it to Lydia and Josiah Lord. … Continue reading 23 Mineral Street, the Lydia and Joseph Lord house (1871)
26 Mineral Street 26 Mineral Street (c 1870) - In the 1872 map, this house and the house at 22 Mineral Street are owned by Ephraim Harris, but only the latter appears in the 1856 map. By 1910 both houses were owned by Mrs. A. Spiller.… Continue reading 26 Mineral Street (c 1870)
28 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 28 Mineral Street (c 1880) - The house at 28 Mineral St. is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map and the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map. The owner's name is shown as "Miss Moore.… Continue reading 28 Mineral Street (c 1880)
3 Mineral Street, Ipswich 3 Mineral Street, the Charles H. Baker house (c 1870) - The house at 3 Mineral Street was constructed between publications of the 1856 and 1872 Ipswich maps. The earliest owner to be identified is Charles H. Baker who owned the house by 1884. Baker is listed is town directories as a "flagman", possibly for the local branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad. … Continue reading 3 Mineral Street, the Charles H. Baker house (c 1870)
31 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 31 Mineral Street (c 1870) - This house first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map. The first owner is shown as "Caldwell." "Gable and Wing" houses with Italianate Victorian woodwork are found throughout Ipswich dating to the period from 1860-1880.… Continue reading 31 Mineral Street (c 1870)
35 Mineral Street, Ipswich 35 Mineral Street, the Smith house (c 1835) - The Ipswich Assessors map shows the date of construction as 1823, but it first appears in the 1856 Ipswich map, and continues into the 20th Century as the Smith house.… Continue reading 35 Mineral Street, the Smith house (c 1835)
39 Mineral Street, Ipswich 39 Mineral Street (c 1920) - The building at this location in the 1910 Ipswich map was a two story barn or storage building belonging to the Smith family. It is unclear if this is the same structure converted into a residence.… Continue reading 39 Mineral Street (c 1920)

Washington and Cottage Streets

Washington St., Ipswich 59 Washington Street, the Charles W. Bamford house (C 1887) - This house was built between 1884 and 1888 for Charles W. Bamford, who was at various times in his career the Town Clerk, Treasurer, and Justice of the Peace. The elaborative cornices and multiple colors of paint are a mix of Italianate and Queen Anne Victorian.… Continue reading 59 Washington Street, the Charles W. Bamford house (C 1887)
Patrick Riley House, 12 Washington St. 12 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (1880) - This house was built between 1872 and 1884 for Patrick and Ellen Riley. Riley was a farmer and he and his wife owned this house and the one at #16. By 1924 this house was occupied by Maurice and Mary Blaquiere.… Continue reading 12 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (1880)
10 Washington St., Ipswich 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770) - The house was constructed before 1770 at 45 N. Main St., and was moved to this location in 1860 by Michael Ready. The second floor was probably added at that time. … Continue reading 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770)
Patrick Riley House on Washington Street, Ipswich MA 16 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (c 1865) - Patrick Riley is listed in town directories as a farmer. By 1924 this house was occupied by Isaac W. Mitchell, a carpenter.… Continue reading 16 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (c 1865)
18 Washington St., Ipswich MA 18 Washington Street, Sanford Peatfield House (1860) - This house was built for Sanford and Mary Peatfield around 1860. Sanford and James Peatfield built a brick mill on Washington Street and continued making woolen underwear until about 1877. The factory became the Hayes Hotel, and burned in the 20th Century.… Continue reading 18 Washington Street, Sanford Peatfield House (1860)
32 Washington St., Ipswich MA 32 Washington Street, the Frederick Bray – Daniel Nourse House (c 1870) - The first owner of this house, built around 1865 was Frederick Bray, a Civil War veteran. By 1884 it was owned by Daniel P. and Sarah Nourse. Nourse died by 1888 and the house was sold. By 1916 it was occupied by Dennis and Nora Monahan. Dennis is listed in town directories as a mason.… Continue reading 32 Washington Street, the Frederick Bray – Daniel Nourse House (c 1870)
31 Washington St., Ipswich MA 31 Washington St., the Laffy – Chapman – Morrill house (c 1880) - This house was built between 1872 and 1884. By 1884 it was owned by Michael Laffy; Laffy is listed in town directories as a laborer. By 1910 the house was owned by Walter Chapman, a farmer who lived on Pineswamp Road and presumably rented this house. In 1916 the house was occupied by Euclid A. and Charolette B. Morrill. In 1924 it was occupied by Insurance agent William F. Connor and his wife Mary.… Continue reading 31 Washington St., the Laffy – Chapman – Morrill house (c 1880)
37 Washington St., Ipswich MA 37 Washington Street, the Brown-Grossman-Doucette house (1884) - This house was built by 1884 by George V. Brown, one of several houses he built on a large parcel. Brown operated a large hay & grain business nearby at Brown Square and lived on Liberty Street. In 1916 this house was occupied by Charles (& Mary) Grossman and Denis (& Maggie) Doucette.… Continue reading 37 Washington Street, the Brown-Grossman-Doucette house (1884)
41 Washington St., Ipswich MA 41 Washington Street, the George Brown house (1883) - John A. Brown sold this lot to George B. Brown in 1883 and he built a house shortly thereafter. Brown’s house is one of the few Stick Style Victorian homes in Ipswich. Brown built a grist mill, also located on Washington St., in 1881. He started with a single team and by 1888 employed 6 men. Brown was the first in the area to install a roller mill, which removed all foreign iron substances from the grain before it entered the mill… Continue reading 41 Washington Street, the George Brown house (1883)
46 Washington St., Ipswich MA 46 Washington Street, the James S. Marble- James Peatfield house (1860) - This two-family house was came into the possession of Sanford and James Peatfield in 1859. James Peatfield came to America in 1827. He built one of the first lace machines in this country, and invented a warp machine, after which he began manufacturing woolen underwear. Together with his brother, Sanford, Peatfield built a brick mill on Washington Street.… Continue reading 46 Washington Street, the James S. Marble- James Peatfield house (1860)
56 Washington St., Ipswich 56 Washington Street, the Ephraim Goodhue House (1875) - The earliest owner of the house was Ephraim Goodhue, listed in town directories as a blacksmith and grocer with a shop on Pleasant Street. By 1902 the house had been converted to two-family use.… Continue reading 56 Washington Street, the Ephraim Goodhue House (1875)
78 Washington St. 78 Washington Street, the Daniel Haskell House (1835) - The Federal trim and substantial chimneys identify this house as perhaps the earliest of the story-and-one-third 19th century cottages on Linebrook. It is uncertain which Daniel Haskell Sr. or Jr. was the owner. Records show that both died of dementia.… Continue reading 78 Washington Street, the Daniel Haskell House (1835)
35 Washington Street 35 Washington Street, the Charles and Margaret Bell house (c 1890) - These identical houses on Cottage St. were built for Charles E. and John A. Brown, who were also involved in speculative development on Brown and Liberty Streets.… Continue reading 35 Washington Street, the Charles and Margaret Bell house (c 1890)
42 Washington St., Ipswich MA 42 Washington Street, DJ’s Variety Store (1938) - This small grocery store was built between 1936 and 1940, and was operated by Christ G. Geanakos as a grocery store. Geanakos lived at 1 Burley Avenue. … Continue reading 42 Washington Street, DJ’s Variety Store (1938)
44 Washington St. 44 Washington St., the Howard Hills house (1905) - The house at 44 Washington Street was built between 1902 and 1907, and was constructed for Howard S. Hills who was manager of Russell’s Ideal Lunch at Depot Square.… Continue reading 44 Washington St., the Howard Hills house (1905)
53 Washington Street, Ipswich ma 53 Washington Street, the George W. Smith – Pickard House, (1880) - The earliest owner to be identified is George W. Smith who owned the house by 1884, and is listed in town directories as a flagman for the railroad. By 1910 the property was owned by Henry A. Pickard .… Continue reading 53 Washington Street, the George W. Smith – Pickard House, (1880)

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