The Central Street Victorian neighborhood

1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich
1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich showing the Central and Washington Streets neighborhood
Wetlands surrounding Farley Brook into the 19th Century, superimposed on a current day map.

In the first two centuries after Ipswich was settled, much of the land between Washington and High Streets was a wetland with Farley’s Brook running through it. After the railroad came to Ipswich in 1839, the center of commerce moved from North Main Street to Market Street, and marked the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The population of Ipswich swelled as immigrants came to work in the mills. Worker housing was constructed in Pole Alley and former farmland creating the Mount Pleasant neighborhood, and are recognized in the National Register of Historic Places, along with High St., the East End, the South Green and Meeting House Green.

Central Street, Ipswich MA

 

Central Street

In the 1872 Ipswich map, Central Street had just been constructed. Manning High School opened two years later, and stores began to be constructed. Ipswich Town Reports during the second half of the 19th Century show payments for hauling gravel from the now-depleted gravel pits near Washington St. and Topsfield Rd. The Town experienced a building boom, and by 1884, the Victorian neighborhoods that line Central, Hammatt, Manning, Mineral, Brown, Cottage and Liberty Streets had been created. This distinctive Ipswich neighborhood is includes historic houses and streets, but has not received historic designation.

The 1872 map of Ipswich shows Central Street still unnamed and unpopulated.
The 1872 Ipswich map shows Central Street still unnamed and unpopulated.
Section from the 1884 Ipswich map showing the new Central Street neighborhood
The 1910 Ipswich map shows how the neighborhood continued to fill in during the late 19th Century.

Houses & buildings in the Farley Brook neighborhood

Central St., Ipswich Ma
Central Street

Central Street

101 Central Street 101 Central Street, Newton house (c 1900) - This house first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map on the same lot with the house in front, labeled, “Mrs. Newton.” Sources: Mary Newton to Arthur Bishop, 1908 Salem Deeds, book 1930, page 3001910 Ipswich mapSalem Deeds, 3502/452: Ernest Harding to Dorothy Barney, 1946
107 Central Street, Ipswich MA 107 Central Street, the Collins house (c 1880) - This rambling double house is trimmed with characteristic Queen Anne finery. The entrance porches are decorated with turned posts, balusters, and spindle screens. Elaborate rising sun motifs in both gables, eave brackets, and staggered butt shingles in the bays complete the design.
108 Central Street, Ipswich MA 108 Central Street, the George W. Baker house (1872) - 108 Central Street is one of three identical houses along this stretch of Central Street. George W. Baker, who served in the Civil War from February, 1962 until August, 1865 occupied the house after its construction.
109 Central Street 109 Central Street, Daniel and Mary Collins house (1873) - The house at 109 Central St. appears in the 1884 Ipswich map as “Collins,” and is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Daniel Collins deeded the house to his “loving daughter” Mary Collins in 1887.  The “parcel of land” “on the new road” was conveyed by Nathan […]
110 Central Street 110 Central Street, the Samuel Baker house (before 1884) - Three identical houses with mansard roofs appear in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map and are still standing. The 1884 Ipswich map shows this house owned by “S. H. Baker” and the one next door owned by “G. H. Baker.” Samuel Baker and other parties conveyed “a certain parcel […]
111 Central Street 111 Central Street, the Albert and Annie Garland house (1894) - The house at 111 Central St. first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as A. S. Garland. Albert J. Garland, Edward Lord and Edward Baxter received a mortgage for the lot “with a new building thereon” in 1894 (Book 1432, page 305). Henry Garland was […]
Tyler Building, Ipswich MA 2 Central Street, the Tyler Building (1906) - The Tyler Building, was the last commercial block on Central Street to be constructed after the 1894 Central Street fire. It was the home of Tyler's Department Store and Quint's Drugs.
33 Central Street, Memorial Hall (1921) - In 1921 the Memorial Building was built in memory of Ipswich Veterans. The long stairs from Central Street were difficult. The town sold the building to a non-profit corporation in 2003 and the building was renovated into affordable elderly housing.
35 Central St., Ipswich MA 35 Central St., the Caldwell-Copp house - The Oak Hill apartments building at 35 Central Street was constructed in 1880 by Joel Caldwell. In 1891, Margaret and Lydia Caldwell sold the property to Carlton and Harriett Copp.
38 Central Street, Ipswich MA 38 Central Street, the Measures building (c 1900) - Austin Measures built this after the Central Street fire of 1894. Measures' Candy Shop was a long-lasting institution that began in a small small building on North Main Street. The building was taken down in 1904 to construct the Colonial Building, and he reopened in this Central Street location.
44 Central Street 44 Central St., the Ellen V. Lang house (c 1885) - The 1884 Ipswich map shows a house set back from Central St., belonging to “Mrs. Wildes.” In 1888, The Agawam Manual and Directory by M.V. B. Perley, shows the following residences: Lang E. V. Mrs, Central corner of Hammatt Lang George T, clerk (Boston) h Central corner of […]
52 Central Street 52 Central Street, the Scahill house (c 1920) - This house doesn’t appear in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map and doesn’t match the house shown in the 1910 Ipswich map. The date of construction is uncertain, but a building at this location was the barber shop owned by barber Thomas Scahill in the Directory of the Town of […]
The Ipswich Fire Department building on Central Street was built for horse-drawn fire trucks 55 Central Street, Central Fire Station (1907) - Constructed for horse-drawn equipment in 1908, this building has served for over a century as the Ipswich fire station.
79 Central Street 79 Central Street, the Foster Russell Jr. house (1883) - John Cogswell sold this lot without a house for $300 to Augustus Russell and Foster Russell Jr. in 1883 (book 1110, page 078). This house appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map; the 1884 and 1910 Ipswich maps show the owner of the house as Foster Russell Jr. […]
80 Central Street 80 Central Street, the Malachi Nolan house (1877) - Dr. Asabel Wildes sold three small lots to Malachi Nolan who appears to have build this house in 1877. His daughter Mary Marshall sold the combined lots with the building to Charles A Sayward in 1911.
Isaac J. Potter house, 82 Central Street, Ipswich MA 82 Central St., the Isaac J. Potter house (b 1884) - This house was the home of Isaac J. Potter, editor of the Ipswich Chronicle, who became the paper's sole proprietor.
83 Central Street, the International House (1866) - In 1866 the International House was built by the Eastern Railroad beside the Ipswich Depot. It was moved in 1882 to make room for a new depot. It continued to be operated as a hotel, and In the 1970's and 80's was known as the House of Hinlin.
87 Central St., Ipswich MA 87 Central Street (c 1890) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 87 Central Street as"Misses Peatsfield." The house is almost identical in construction to the house at 89 Central Street, which is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map.
88 Central Street, Ipswich MA 88 Central Street, the W. L. Johnson house (c 1880) - The W. L. Johnson house is the most ambitious Mansard on Central St., and preserves original decorative detailing. A matching carriage house also survives.
90 Central Street 90 Central Street, the Brown-Riley house (1897) - Deeds: Salem Deeds book 1517, page 254: Abbie Lord to Maria Brown, June 3, 1897. Sale of a parcel of land for $700. Salem Deeds book 1841, page 185: James Brown to Adelle Riley, 1906. Sale of parcel of land with house thereon. Salem Deeds book 2932 page […]
91 Central Street 91 Central Street, the Sylvanius and Mary Canney house (c 1866) - The house at this location first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map under the name "S. F. Canney." Sylvanius F. Canney purchased the lot in 1866, and sold the house and land to Israel Jewett in 1869. 
92 Central St., the Abbie G. Lord house, 1871 - The house at 90 Central St., was constructed after Andrew Geyer purchased the lot from Amos Smith in 1869. He sold the finished house to Abbie G. Lord in 1873, who sold to Maria J. Brown in 1897.
97 Central Street 97 Central Street, the Mary Newton house (c 1890) - This house was constructed after the 1884 Ipswich map, with stick-style Victorian decorative features. The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner as "Mrs. Newton."
98 Central Street 98 Central Street, the William and Abigail Haskell house (b 1884) - This house first appears under the name William Haskell in the 1884 Ipswich map.The house is shown as “A. Damon” in the 1910 map. It is also shown in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich.

Brown Square and Granite Streets

Burke Shoe Factory Ipswich Ma Hammatt Streer, Brown Square and Farley Brook - Until the second half of the 19th Century, much of the area bounded by Central Street, Washington Street, Mineral Street and Market Street was a wetland with an open sewer known as Farley Brook running through it.

Ipswich Ale Brewery 2 Brewery Place (Brown Square) Ipswich Ale Brewery (c 1900) - The Burke Shoe Heel factory burned on June 19, 1933, but this wing survived the fire, and is today the Ipswich Ale Brewery. It was the home of Saffron Brothers, the exclusive suppliers of clams to the Howard Johnson chain for 32 years.
Tedford's Lumber Ipswich MA 10 Brown Square, Tedfords Lumber (1933) - Tedford's Lumber on Brown Square got its start in 1946 when James Tedford Sr. and Bill Martin, just back from the Navy, took a portable sawmill into the woods to cut timber. The next year they decided to open a lumber yard on Brown Square.
19 Brown Square 19 Brown Square (1903) - Harold Bowen wrote that this building was constructed from bricks that were saved from where the parking lot is now for the Ipswich Inn opposite N. Main st.

Brown Street, Ipswich
Brown Street

Brown  and Cottage Streets

The Missing Burial Ground - The Case of the Missing Burial Ground Lesslie Road Burial Ground Linebrook Parish, Old Ipswich, Massachusetts Story by: Bruce Laing Toward a comprehensive documentation of the greater Ipswich burial grounds In 1935 Arthur Warren Johnson and Ralph Elbridge Ladd jr. wrote Momento Mori, a map and transcription of tombstones […]
Map of the Ipswich hills The hills of Ipswich - The photo above is a view of Heartbreak Hill taken from the roof of a building onNorth Main Street in 1879. Mills line County Street on either side of the bridge which was only a few years old at that time. The mills are gone now, and Heartbreak […]
Martha Winthrop’s grave - The Ipswich Chronicle ran this story in the year 2000. Burial site of first settler may be revealed  A recent letter to the Zoning Board may hold some clues to the location of the gravesite of Mrs. John Winthrop and her child who may have been buried on […]
The Ipswich Townie Test - In 2008 the Ipswich Chronicle ran a series of articles called “The Townie Test”. Readers responded with their answers. Q1: Name the successful Ipswich retail merchant known as “Taffy.” A: Howard “Taffy” Hill Q2: What was the name of the dry cleaning business that was once located on […]
1894: the Year that Ipswich Burned - At about 1:30 am, Police gave the alarm that Central Street was on fire.The citizens of Ipswich tumbled out from their beds and faced as wicked a night as the town has ever seen. Four months later the other end of downtown burned.
The Blizzard of ’78, February 5, 1978 - The "Blizzard of '78" raged from Sunday evening February 5 through Tuesday evening February 7. Over a billion dollars of damage occurred, including the loss of 11,000 homes and the lives of 29 Massachusetts residents. The highest total snowfall was 43.7 inches in Ipswich.
One Third for the Widow - Under Puritan law, widows could keep only one third of their property. Martha Ringe was widowed with small children after her husband died. After considering her petition, the court allowed Martha to marry John Wood before three years had passed "in order to advance her circumstances."
How I came to Ipswich - It's never too late to decide what you'll be when you grow up.
A beautiful little bridge - Bob Foote took this photo of a small bridge just beyond the EBSCO building that is along the tracks beyond the train station. Kimball Brook is a small stream that originates at Scott Hill off of Topsfield road, curves around Bush Hill and then crosses Topsfield Road  and the […]
Into the Fire, 2001 - On a Tuesday night in January 2001 the Collum house at 18 Lafayette Street went up in flames. Harold Bowen once wrote that this house had been built from lumber that was salvaged when a tall wood fence surrounding Bialek Park was removed early in the 20th Century. […]
View from Bayberry Hill - This is a wonderful photo of the Ipswich River taken by Ipswich photographer George Dexter in 1906. He was standing on Bayberry Hill near the top of Spring Street where Arthur Wesley Dow had a studio.    
A short history of Ipswich dog laws - 1644 The following is transcribed from the Ipswich Town Meeting, May 11, 1644: “It is ordered that all doggs for the space of three weeks after the publishing hereof shall have one legg tyed up, and if such a dogg shall break loose and be found doing any harm, […]
“Pivot Rock” at Crane Castle - After living here for almost 10 years, two people told me separately yesterday about a huge rock that acts as a pivoting gate on a trail that runs between the old Rose Garden and the former Casino at the Crane Estate. Mr. Richard Crane liked to surprise his […]
The year without summer in New England 1816, the year without summer - On June 5, 1816 a heat wave raised the temperature in Ipswich to 92° but that afternoon a cold front swept across New England and the temperature fell to 43° by the next morning. For the next four days there were severe frosts along the Eastern seaboard, and snow was recorded in some locations. By the 9th of June ice began to form on water left standing outside overnight. Rapid, dramatic temperature swings continued throughout the summer.
A look back at the 1950 Ipswich Town Report - With the recurring subject of the school budget override in mind, I decided to look back to the annual report for the year I was born, condensed below: IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT The School Budget for 1950 The budget here presented for 1950 requires the expenditure of $181,524.42. Of […]
Wreck of the Lucy M. Collins, August 19, 1891 - When you’re walking on Crane Beach near Steep Hill  Coal, you might be surprised to see lumps of coal lying on the sand. This would be quite a mystery were it not for the tragic history of brigs and schooners transporting coal in the 19th century. Wreck of the Lucy […]
The Ipswich drive-through ban - In 1999, the Town of Ipswich began a growth management initiative for the 21st Century which came to be called “The Future of Ipswich Planning Project.” Its overall purpose was to help the residents, business owners, and property owners in Ipswich agree on a vision for the future […]
Memories of Quint’s Corner - Buddy Riel commented, “Quints Corner had an effect on so many Ipswich people. A lot of us can mark the stages of our early lives by the events we remember and the things we did, when we were ‘downtown’.” Ian Kirkland responded, “I was only 12 when this […]
Parades - Photos from 20th Century Ipswich parades
Gothic Gables of Ipswich - The Gothic Revival style was a mid-19th century movement in architecture, reflecting the public’s taste for buildings inspired by medieval design. The Gables is a fascinating Gothic Revival home at 11 South Village Green, behind the John Baker House.  The house was designed by mathematician David Baker and […]
Wreck of the Edward S. Eveleth, October 1922 - In October 1922, the sand schooner Edward S. Eveleth rolled over when a wave rushed over her deck and pushed her onto the edge of Steep Hill Beach. Filled with sand, each tide buried her deeper. Her remains were visible for several years. The skeleton of the hull is just off-shore a short distance from the wreck of the Ada K. Damon.
Parting paths stone marker Rt. 133 and 1A Ipswich Ma Parting Paths - The intersection of Rt. 133 and  Rt. 1A is where Essex Road branches off from Bay Road/County Road and was for many years known as”Parting Paths.”
Attack on Brookfield Ipswich, the Brookfield Massacre and King Philip’s War - In 1660, a group of Ipswich families settled in Quaboag which they renamed Brookfield. Indian attacks in 1675 resulted in its destruction.
Spectral leaguers, Gloucester MA The Spectre Leaguers, July 1692 - In the midst of witchcraft accusations in 1692, Gloucester was invaded by a spectral company for a fortnight. Their speech was in an unknown tongue, and bullets passed right through them. The alarm became so great that Major Samuel Appleton of Ipswich sent sixty men on the 18th of July.
Hook and Ladder 1 and heroic George Gilmore - by Harold Bowen, from Tales of Olde Ipswich, Volume 1. (published early 1970’s). He adds, “It is hoped that after my story is read this week, those persons who delight in sounding a false fire alarm will perhaps have found a lesson in this tragedy on South Main […]
Agawam - At the time of the arrival of European colonists in the 1630′s, the Ipswich area was known as Agawam but the Native Americans had been decimated by what is now believed to have been a hepatitis plague. The population of the Agawam region stretching from the Danvers River to the Merrimack River had been in the thousands. Arrowheads are still found in the fields, along the Ipswich River and out to Jeffreys's Neck.
Ann Bradstreet, America's first published poet Anne Dudley Bradstreet, the colony’s first published poet - Often alone in Ipswich while her husband Simon was engaged in government, Anne Bradstreet wrote a collection of poems published in London in 1650 titled, "The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America...by a Gentlewoman in these Parts."
The Boardman House in Saugus - The Boardman House is at 7 Howard Street in Saugus, MA. Built in 1692 for the family of William Boardman, a joiner, Boardman House survives remarkably intact from its original construction. With the exception of minor structural stabilization and repairs, the house remains unaltered since the early eighteenth century, providing […]
The Breakfast Club - A couple of days ago I sat down with an illustrious group of Ipswich gentlemen for their morning repast and reparte.  (I may have to quit going to work so I can join them more often!) The text for this story is from an article written a while […]
The Clammer - It had to be a tough decision for Tom Pappas to hang up the clamming fork after a lifetime of use.
The Ipswich Safety Steam Automobile, 1901 - The Safety Steam Automobile Company headquarters was in Boston but its factory was at Depot Square in Ipswich.
The Ipswich Post Offices - The first known post office in Ipswich was on North Main Street in the small red building across from First Church. It was built in 1763, probably as a barn or warehouse. In 1775, a committee from Ipswich began meeting with other towns, from Newburyport to Danvers, regarding […]
The Parker Brothers Game of Cycling, Salem MA The North Shore and the Golden Age of Cycling - The invention of the Columbia Safety bicycle in 1886 enabled a cyclist from Newton to ride round-trip to Ipswich on the Newburyport Turnpike (Rt. 1) in 9 hours 50 minutes, setting a new record for a 100 mile ride.
John Winthrop Jr. here and gone - John Winthrop the younger was the son of Massachusetts Bay Colony governor John Winthrop, and led the settlement of Agawam in 1633 (renamed Ipswich in 1634), accompanied by 11 men. During that first year they erected crude shelters and the next year brought their families to join them […]
Police open fire at the Ipswich Mills Strike, June 10, 1913 - On June 10, 1913, police fired into a crowd of protesting immigrant workers at the Ipswich hosiery mill. A young Greek woman named Nicholetta Paudelopoulou was shot in the head and killed by police. Fifteen persons, including the local leaders of the I.W.W. were taken into custody.
Views of rooftops from downtown Ipswich, circa 1900 -   The photo below is a panoramic made of two views from the roof of the old Hayes Hotel at the corner of Depot Square and Hammatt Street, which had a flat-roof wing on the back. The photos were;taken several years after the 1894 fire, which;destroyed all of […]
Daniel Denison grave at the Old North Burying Ground in Ipswich Daniel Denison - Daniel Denison became Major General of the colonial forces and represented Ipswich in the general court. He was remembered with high esteem by the people of Ipswich well into the 19th Century. You can visit Denison's grave at the Old North Burial Ground.
Building and launching the schooner Ardelle in Essex - The 55-foot pinky schooner Ardelle was designed and built by Harold Burnham of Burnham Boat Building in Essex MA using locally harvested wood and hand tools and similar techniques to those that Colonial-era shipbuilders used. Hundreds of spectators watched from the Essex Shipbuilding Museum in 2011 for the launching of the Ardelle into […]
Tedfords MA building The old grain elevator at Tedfords - The building had a long history of use by several businesses for grain storage. It was moved from its original location near the Town Wharf to its present location at Brown Square.
Thomas Ellsworth, Civil War hero Thomas Foulds Ellsworth - Thomas Foulds Ellsworth grew up in the Ipswich Lighthouse Keeper's house, and was one of four soldiers who earned the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Battle at Honey Hill, South Carolina, on November 30, 1864.
The Ipswich Company Massachusetts State Guard The Ipswich Company, Massachusetts State Guard, 1942 - (Thanks to Larry Collins for sharing this  document) With substantially 15,000 man hours of practice, procedure and training under their military belts, the Ipswich Company of the Massachusetts State Guard is rapidly being whipped into shape as a trained military unit for the protection of life and property […]
Troubles with Sheep - Thomas Granger was the 16 year old son of Thomas and Grace Granger of Plymouth Plantation, and was a servant to Love Brewster of Duxbury. He was found guilty of having sexual relations with animals in Love’s barn. Granger’s execution on September 8, 1642 was the first in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
Captain Arthur Hardy Vietnam War Captain Arthur H. Hardy, 1972 - Arthur Hans Hardy grew up in Ipswich, On a mission over the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos on March 14, 1972, Hardy's aircraft was hit and he bailed out nar enemy troops. His body is buried at Highland Cemetery in Ipswich.
Sally Weatherall - Sally's Pond on South Main St. is dedicated to the memory of Sally Weatherall, who volunteered many hours to her Town as a member of the Conservation Commission and helped achieve development of the Open Space Plan.
Battle of clammers over the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Clam Battle! (Life Magazine, July 16, 1945) - The government had taken over the lands for a Wildlife Refuge. The clam battle was on. Arguments were almost as thick as Ipswich clams. Ipswich hunters were afraid of losing their private hunting reserves. Ipswich farmers were afraid of losing their land.
The Cape Ann Earthquake, November 18, 1755 - A series of earthquakes in the 17th and 18th Centuries gave rise to recurrences of religiosity through New England. June 1, 1638:  Believed to have been centered along the Connecticut River Valley with a magnitude of about 6.5, this was the strongest known earthquake to hit New England: […]
Haselelponiah Wood, buried in the Old North Burying ground in Ipswich Haselelpony Wood, November 27, 1714 - Obadiah Wood married 35-year-old widow Haselelponiah, whose scriptural name means "A shadow falls upon me," the only person in modern history with that name. Haselelpony Wood's tombstone is located at the Old North Burial Ground in Ipswich.
Hannah Duston The Amazing Story of Hannah Duston, March 14, 1697 - Hannah Duston was born in Ipswich in 1657 while her mother was visiting her relatives the Shatswells. A bronze statue in Haverhill honors her daring escape, killing and scalping a dozen Abanaki captors.
The reluctant pirate from Ipswich, Captain John Fillmore - John Fillmore was born in Ipswich in 1702, the son of mariner John Fillmore Sr. who died at sea in 1711. His widowed mother was Abigail Tilton, whose two brothers Jacob and Daniel famously overcame and killed several Indians who took them hostage after boarding their fishing schooner […]
History of Gloucester, MA - The History of the town and city of Gloucester, Cape Ann, Massachusetts was written by James Pringle in 1892 and is online at Archive.org.
A tragic story from old Gloucester - In 1821, the Annisquam woods was the scene of a murder. Gorham Parsons, while chopping wood, struck and instantly killed a boy of 10 years, named Eben Davis, the act being done with a hatchet. The boy had given offense by singing a song. After committing the deed […]
Three old houses that stood on High Street at Manning and Mineral - The Caleb Lord House, corner of High and Manning Excerpts from an article by Paul McGinley. Featured image: The house on the left in this old photo is the Caleb Lord House, on the corner of Manning and High Streets. Notice the very steep slope of the roof which hangs […]
WWII scrap metal collection in Ipswich - To build tanks, ships, and planes during WWII, scrap metal drives were held across the country, and Ipswich was no exception.The location is Market Square across from Market Street.
Ipswich MA Agawam Tercentenary plaque Early Ipswich, “A paradise for politicians” - Due to the small scale of the settlement, the settlers of Ipswich reproduced an English form of government from a far earlier time. The first public officials were the clerk, lot-layers and "The Seven Men" (selectmen). By the end of the next century, every industry was supervised by some public functionary.
1793 and 1818: the “Burden of the Poor” divides Ipswich into 3 towns, Ipswich, Hamilton and Essex - As the people of the Hamlet were financially stable, the burden of taxation for the support of the poor in the old town of Ipswich was considered to be an unjust imposition. The leaders of the parish petitioned Ipswich to be allowed to incorporate as the new town of Hamilton. 25 years later, the men of Chebacco petitioned the Legislature for incorporation as a separate town, and to not be held for any part of the new establishment for the relief of the poor in Ipswich. The following year, Chebacco Parish became the Town of Essex
Wreck of the Hesperus, January 6, 1839 - It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintry sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughtèr, To bear him company.
Lord Timothy Dexter's house in Newburyport Lord Timothy Dexter - Lord Timothy Dexter of Newburyport was insane but profited from everything he undertook. He declared himself to be "the greatest philosopher in the known world." His book, "A Pickle for the Knowing Ones" is a collection of whatever entered his head at the moment, spelling as he wished, and devoid of punctuation.
1639: “The pigs have liberty” - From the Ancient Records of the town of Ipswich, January 13, 1639 “Agreed that if any swine shall be taken within two miles of the towne, after the tenth day of April next, running, the owners of such swine shall forfeit five shillings a piece for every such swine, the […]
The old American Elm tree succumbs, July 11, 2012 - The American Elm tree at the corner of County Street and East Streets succumbed to Dutch Elm disease and on July 11, 2012 it was felled. The town made available pieces of the wood to artisans, woodworkers, furniture makers, builders, crafters and nonprofit organizations. Applications were reviewed by the Ipswich Department […]
The Old South Cemetery - The Old South Cemetery in Ipswich, MA was used from 1756 till 1939, with a few more recent burials. It sits at the southwestern end of the South Green, and has about 1000 interments. A walking trail extends down the slope to the River, continuing downstream to Sallys Pond near the Whipple […]
Depot Square - The Eastern Railroad ran from Boston to Portland, continuing to Canada and was the primary competition of the Boston and Maine Railroad until it was acquired by the B&M in the late 1880’s to become the B&M’s Eastern Division. The Ipswich Depot sat at the location of the […]
Courage boulder at Dogtown Dogtown, its history and legends - Dogtown is a five square mile area of Gloucester and Rockport strewn with glacial boulders. Visitors to Dogtown find cellar holes of abandoned houses, and boulders emblazoned with inspirational messages.
“A Good Heat,” a short tale from Newburyport - From Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian, by Sarah Anna Emery
The Blizzard of 2015, Argilla Road in Ipswich Photos from the Great Snow of 2015 - Images from the blizzard, January 27, 2015 and the series of snowstorms that followed. Many photos are from the I Love Ipswich Facebook group. Featured image: the road into Crane Beach, by Diane Young.
Ipswich Red Raiders, “a melting pot of awesome contenders!” - “A melting pot of awesome contenders were the Ipswich Red Raiders, members of a semiprofessional football league active during the late 1930’s and 1940’s. The Ipswich Red Raiders won the division championship in 1935. Made up of Ipswich men in their twenties and early thirties, they played teams […]
Lowell women’s suffrage activist Florence Luscomb - Florence Luscomb was among the first women to graduate from M.I.T. with a degree in architecture. In her career she designed designed public buildings and housing for workers, while working tirelessly for women's suffrage.
Barton Stone, end of an era - Barton Stone and Monuments on Brown Square,  was the oldest business in Ipswich . A.J. Barton & Son Inc. was started in 1889 by August Barton Sr., and continued under his son Augustus Barton Jr., known as “Gus.” Gordon Player, Phillip Lepage and Scott Kershaw  each owned the company […]
Four-year-old Dorothy Good is jailed for witchcraft, March 24, 1692 - On March 24, 1682. a child, Dorothy Good of Salem was taken custody, and interrogated by the local magistrates for two weeks. Hungry, cold and missing her mother, Dorcas broke down and told the inquisitors what they wanted to hear, that her mother was a witch, and consorted with the devil.
Ipswich MA and the Salem witchcraft trials Ipswich and the Salem witchcraft trials - During the Salem witch trials, Elizabeth Howe of Linebrook Road was tried and hung. The Ipswich jail was filled with the accused, but the ministers of the town opposed the trials as a delusion. Residents blocked the bridge to prevent the accusing girls from being brought into Ipswich.
Gorton’s becomes the largest fishing business on the Atlantic coast, March 31, 1906 - On March 31, 1906, the people of Cape Ann were stunned by the news that Gorton’s would merge with three other Gloucester fish companies.
Newburyport and its Neighborhoods, 1874, by Harriet Prescott Spofford - Excerpt from “Newburyport and its Neighborhood” by Harriet Prescott Spofford, July 1875, the New Harper’s Monthly Magazine. “The history of Newburyport, and of her mother Newbury, much of which has become incorporated with herself, is replete with striking facts and marvels. She had not only the first of […]
Captain John Smith New England “A Land of Promise,” April 1614 - In April of 1614, Captain John Smith of Virginia sailed near Ipswich, about which he recorded, “Here are many rising hills, and on their tops and descents are many corne fields and delightful groves… There is also Okes, Pines, Walnuts and other wood to make this place an […]
Joppa Flats, Newburyport - In the late 19th Century, clam shacks proliferated along a stretch of the Merrimack River in Newburyport known as Joppa Flats, providing clams to the Boston area. Photos in this slideshow were provided by Laurie Jarvis Short. Visit her Joppa Flats page on Facebook.
Legacy: Shipbuilders, Fisherman and the Age of the Gloucester Schooners - Over 4000 wooden vessels were launched from Essex, including many schooners that sailed from nearby Gloucester, once the largest fishing port in the United States. The video "Legacy: Shipbuilders, Fishermen and the Age of the Gloucester Schooners" was produced by Jim and Laura Lowell.
Hayes Hotel, Depot Square, Ipswich MA The Hayes Hotel - The Hayes Hotel was constructed in 1842 as a woolen goods factory. Converted to a tavern and hotel in 1885, the building was being used as a rooming house when it burned in 1969 with a loss of life.
John Winthrop’s journal of the ship Arbella’s voyage to America, March 29 – July 8, 1630 - On April 7, 1630, the Arabella was a week out from its port in England, and the last well-wishers returned to shore. The winds were finally favorable, and the ship weighed anchor and sailed for New England, with Governor John Winthrop and approximately 300 English Puritans on board, leaving their homes in England to settle in a fledgling colony.
John Dunton's visit to Ipswich John Dunton’s visit to Ipswich and Rowley, 1686 - in 1686, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart on High St. were favored with a visit from the book seller John Dunton, who came to Ipswich "in the course of his saddle-bag peregrinations."
Birthplace of American Independence - Resistance by the citizens and leaders of Ipswich to a tax imposed by the Crown in 1687 is commemorated in the seal of the town of Ipswich, which bears the motto, "The Birthplace of American Independence 1687."
Engraving of Market Square in Ipswich from John Warner Barber’s Historical collections: being a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, etc. relating to the history and antiquities of every town in Massachusetts,” published in 1839 Ipswich town meeting - Featured image: Ipswich woodcut, 1838 attributed to S. E. Brown. Thomas Franklin Waters recorded the early history of Town Meeting in his book, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The first Ipswich public official appointed was the Clerk, Robert Lord, chosen in February 1643-4, “from this time forward to be […]
The “wearing of long hair” - The wearing of long hair was a burning theme of address in the early Puritan pulpit. The clergy prescribed that the hair should by no means lie over the band or doublet collar. In 1649, the Governor and seven of the Assistants declared their “dislike and detestation against the wearing of such long hair, whereby men doe deforme themselves, and offend sober and modest men.”
The day Nute Brown crashed through the Choate Bridge - In the early 1900's, just about everybody knew Elisha Newton Brown, better known as Nute Brown. He was a prosperous farmer who lived in the Candlewood section of town.
Mothers Day Flood, May 14-16, 2006 - Fourteen inches of rain fell between May 14 and May 16, 2006, creating the historic 2006 Mothers Day Flood.  Water flow levels in the Ipswich River were 27% higher than recorded in previous epic floods. Photos are from the Ipswich River Watershed Association site with additonal photos provided by myself and readers. Kerry […]
Photos from Ipswich Town Reports - In the 1950’s and 60’s, Ipswich town reports had photos that we find very amusing now.
Rachel Clinton of Ipswich was accused of witchcraft Rachel Clinton arrested for witchcraft, May 28, 1692 - Everything about Rachel Clinton's life went wrong, and in her old age she was an easy target for the witchcraft hysteria that spread from Salem throughout Essex County.
The Great Newburyport fire, May 31, 1811 - Nearly 250 buildings burned, and upwards of ninety families lost their homes and the means of furnishing themselves with the necessities of life.
Old footbridge on the Ipswich River at the downtown dam. A photographic history of the Ipswich Mills Dam - Until 350 years ago, the Ipswich River ran unencumbered from its origin 35 miles upstream, carving its way through a 148-square-mile watershed. Herring, shad, salmon and alewife swam upstream to spawn. Thomas Franklin Waters noted that, “Great shoals of alewives came up the river in the Spring and were seined […]
Bombshell from Louisbourg - Mounted securely to a stone post at the corner of Middle and Independent Streets in Newburyport, there was for many years a large cast-iron bombshell, thrown from a mortar at the Second Siege of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia in 1758. It was brought to Newbury by Nathaniel Knapp, who served as […]
Bill George’s nostalgic look at old Ipswich - Paul Valcour interviewed Bill George twice for his show on Ipswich ICAM, and Bill shared his collection of old Ipswich photographs.
First Church burns, June 13, 1965 - It was a sad day for Ipswich when on June 13, 1965, lightning hit the steeple on the sanctuary of the First Church on Meeting House Green and the building was destroyed by fire. The building was more than a century old and was considered to be one of the […]
Georgetown-Ipswich trolley The trolley comes to Ipswich, June 26, 1896 - In 1896, the first trolley from Beverly arrived in Ipswich, and a year later, the Georgetown, Rowley and Ipswich Street Railway opened. By 1919, Mr. Ford's Model T ended the brief era of the street railway.
Ipswich Samuel Goodhue's pier, circa 1907 Samuel Goodhue’s pier - In the early 20th Century, Samuel Goodhue operated a canoe rental business on the Ipswich River at the end of Peatfield St in the area known as Pole Alley.
The Great Salem Fire, June 25, 1914 - A raging fire a half-mile mile wide and a mile-and-a-half long burned a swath through the city. Almost half of the population of 48,000 people lost their homes.
The hanging of Ezra Ross and Bathsheba Spooner, July 2, 1778 - In 1778, sixteen-year-old Ezra Ross of Ipswich was condemned to death for the murder of Joshua Spooner of Brookfield. Spooner's wife Bathsheba became the first woman executed in the newly-created United States of America. Ezra Ross is buried in an unmarked grave at the Leslie Road Cemetery.
Names of the Ipswich slaves - In 1641 the Massachusetts Bay Colony adopted a code of laws that made slavery legal. In 1755, the slaves in this town above the age of sixteen numbered sixty-two, but within ten years, public opinion began turn against slavery. In 1780, the present Constitution of Massachusetts was adopted, its first article asserting that all men are born free and equal.
“Hatchet Hannah” leads raid on Rockport liquor establishments, July 8, 1856 - On the morning of July 8, 1856, two hundred women, three men and their supporters gathered in Rockport's Dock Square and unfurled a banner with a black hatchet, determined to destroy all the alcohol in the town. The leaders of the mob was a 75-year-old seamstress named Hannah Jumper.
Dustbane–sawdust in a can! - Dustbane Products was founded in 1908 by two entrepreneurial Canadians, Chester E. Pickering and George W. Green, who managed to convince people to buy pine-scented sawdust for cleaning floors, despite the fact that people already used free sawdust for that purpose. U.S. Manufacturing plants were established in Chicago and Ipswich.The […]
Legendary ships of Salem - The photos and text below are from Old-time Ships of Salem, published by the Essex Institute, 1917. “From the year of its settlement in 1628 until the middle of the 19th century, Salem, in the Massachusetts Bay, was a maritime port surpassed in size and importance by only two or three […]
President Monroe’s brief visit to Ipswich - "This morning about nine o'clock the President of the United States, Monroe, passed through Ipswich. He was attended by a large concourse of people; they paid him all the honor possible."
Ipswich Riverwalk Mural The Ipswich Riverwalk mural - In 2005 EBSCO Publishing commissioned artist Alan Pearsall to paint a 2,700-square-foot mural on one of the old mill buildings occupied by the company in Ipswich. The mural is the centerpiece of the town's Riverwalk.

Hammatt Street

211 Argilla Rd., Ipswich 211 Argilla Rd., the Mary Ann Archer Lord house (1902) - In 1902, Mary Ann Archer Lord of Boston purchased 20 Acres of Land on Argilla Road from the Smith family. No buildings are mentioned in the deed. In 1929, Sidney Lord and other parties sold to Benjamin Van Wick the property, including buildings, bordering on the lot of […]
6 Highland Ave., Ipswich MS 6 Highland Ave., the George Spencer Sr. house (c 1880) - The house at 6 Highland Ave. was first owned by George Spencer. Maps and deeds indicated a construction date of approximately 1880.
4 Highland Ave., Ipswich 4 Highland Ave., the George & Elizabeth Spencer house (c 1910) - The house at 4 Highland Ave. was constructed by George Spencer after he acquired the lot from his father, George Spencer II in 1906.
14 Summer St., Ipswich MA 14 Summer St., the Isaiah Rogers house (c 1870) - The first known owner of 14 Summer St. Is Isaiah Rogers, shown on the 1872 Ipswich map. The property was sold in 1886 to Sara Fellows Lord.
3 Candlewood Rd., Ipswich MA 3 Candlewood Rd., the Brown-Whipple house (1812) - Joseph Brown built this house in 1812 as a dwelling for his son, James, and sold him the house and 3 acres, Dec. 23, 1817. The entire estate of Joseph Brown eventually was inherited by James. In 1852, D. F. Brown and the other heirs sold their interest to Hervey Whipple, who had married Martha P., daughter of James Brown, July 3, 1852. The heirs of Hervey Whipple still occupied into the 21st Century.
35 Central St., Ipswich MA 35 Central St., the Caldwell-Copp house - The Oak Hill apartments building at 35 Central Street was constructed in 1880 by Joel Caldwell. In 1891, Margaret and Lydia Caldwell sold the property to Carlton and Harriett Copp.
79 East St., Ipswich MA 79 East St., Curran house (c 1870) - The 1872 Ipswich map shows a house with this configuration with the name T. Curran. Two acres "with the buildings thereon" at or near this location was sold for $100 by Timothy and Julia Curran in 1859 to Israel K. Jewett, who already owned adjoining property.
Brown Stocking Mill, Ipswich MA Brown Stocking Mill Historic District - At the beginning of the 20th century, Harry Brown established a hosiery mill and laid out Brownsville Avenue with 22 workers houses just south of his factory, which were added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1996
Plum Island the Way it Was Plum Island the Way it Was - Published in 1993, this 100-page book is copied with permission from the estate of the late Nancy Weare. Read by scrolling this page, or click on any image to read as a slideshow.
Short videos of Ipswich MA Videos - Short videos of Ipswich
34 Lakeman’s Lane, the Wade-Kinsman- Cameron house (c 1860) - Deed searches suggest that Asa Wade's barn may have been converted into a residence by Mary or William Kinsman., expanded and modernized in 1939.
Chebacco Old Graveyard interment locations - These inscriptions are based on a cemetery survey taken in 1991, and transcribed to a computer file by the Essex Shipbuilding Museum, edited and annotated by Kurt Wilhelm. The letters and numbers in the identification of each gravestone indicates the location of the gravestone at the time of the […]
Historic Places - Ipswich, Massachusetts is America’s best-preserved Puritan Town and is known as the “Birthplace of American Independence.”
Goodhue's Store faced the South Green in Ipswich Ipswich Streets and Neighborhoods - The 19th and 20th Century saw the size of Ipswich grow greatly. New streets and neighborhoods were created, expanding the historic community.
6 Riverbank Lane Ipswich, the Kenyon house 6 Riverbank Lane, the Henry Rodman Kenyon house (1902) - In 1899 Kenyon married the t pastel portraitist Caroline A. Savary and by 1901 Kenyon and his wife had settled at Ipswich in a home they called the Riverbank House. His small scenic paintings record the seasons in Ipswich.
Restaurants in Ipswich MA Restaurants & lodging - Listings of Ipswich restaurants and inns from Google Maps and Trip Advisor.
35 County St., Ipswich MA 35 County St., the Lydia and Reuben Daniels house (1863) - The house was build by Reuben Daniels, surveyor and shoe manufacturer, and his wife Lydia.
55 East St., Ipswich MA 55 East St. (c 1922) - This house is said to have been constructed from the front left section of Asa Lord's store when it was removed from Lord Square in the 1920's.
Joshua Giddings - Weatherall house, 66 Labor in Vain Rd., Ipswich 66 Labor in Vain Rd., the Giddings-Gould-Weatherall house (1795-1850) - This house was the home of Joseph and Abigail Patch Cogswell who married in 1797. Their son David became an important figure in Wisconsin. For 48 years this was the home of Mary Weatherall
Trails on the Massachusetts North Shore Ipswich Trails - Maps and information for dozens of hiking trails in Ipswich and the surrounding area.
136 County Rd., Ipswich, the home of Francis Henry Richardson 136 County Rd., the Francis Henry Richardson house (1902) - The artist Francis Henry Richardson built a house for his family in Ipswich after studying at the Academie Julian in France. In Ipswich he concentrated on landscapes and only a few portraits. His exhibitions included the National Academy of Design, Pennsylvania Academy, Detroit Museum of Art, Salamagundi Club and others, receiving the Philadelphia Art Society medal in 1902 and the Boston Art Club Purchase Prize in 1903.
7 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich MA 7 Linebrook Rd. (1914) - The actual date of construction for the house at 7 Linebrook Rd. is unverified. There is a tradition that 5 Linebrook was originally at this location and was moved.
William Shurcliff house Argilla Rd. 203 Argilla Rd., the William Shurcliff house (1963) - The house at 203 Argilla Rd. was designed in 1963 for William Shurcliff by architect Royal Barry Wills.
13 Mount Pleasant Avenue 13 Mount Pleasant Avenue, the Mary Nugent house (1874) - This house is probably the oldest on Mount Pleasant Avenue, but its early history is uncertain.
39 Mineral Street, Ipswich 39 Mineral Street (c 1920) - The building at this location in the 1910 Ipswich map was a two story barn or storage building belonging to the Smith family. It is unclear if this is the same structure converted into a residence.
35 Mineral Street, Ipswich 35 Mineral Street, the Smith house (c 1835) - The Ipswich Assessors map shows the date of construction as 1823, but it first appears in the 1856 Ipswich map, and continues into the 20th Century as the Smith house.
31 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 31 Mineral Street (c 1870) - This house first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map. The first owner is shown as "Caldwell." "Gable and Wing" houses with Italianate Victorian woodwork are found throughout Ipswich dating to the period from 1860-1880.
3 Mineral Street, Ipswich 3 Mineral Street, the Charles H. Baker house (c 1870) - The house at 3 Mineral Street was constructed between publications of the 1856 and 1872 Ipswich maps. The earliest owner to be identified is Charles H. Baker who owned the house by 1884. Baker is listed is town directories as a "flagman", possibly for the local branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 
28 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 28 Mineral Street (c 1880) - The house at 28 Mineral St. is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map and the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map. The owner's name is shown as "Miss Moore.
26 Mineral Street 26 Mineral Street (c 1870) - In the 1872 map, this house and the house at 22 Mineral Street are owned by Ephraim Harris, but only the latter appears in the 1856 map. By 1910 both houses were owned by Mrs. A. Spiller.
23 Mineral Street 23 Mineral Street, the Lydia and Joseph Lord house (1871) - Andrew Geyer purchased the lot in 1871 and in 1873 sold the lot with a house on it to Lydia and Josiah Lord. 
20 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 20 Mineral Street, the Lucy Ackerman house (c 1870) - This house began as a story and a half Mansard cottage, with the Mineral Street wing added later. The small front mansard cottage is shown in the 1872 map with the name "Mrs. L. Ackerman,"
19 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 19 Mineral Street (1856) - In 1856, Mary Lord Baker, widow of Stephen W. Baker transferred 1 1/2 acres including this lot to Mary Philbrook. The Philbrook family constructed a house on the property, which appears in the 1872 Ipswich map.
14 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 14 Mineral Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Mineral Street does not appear on the 1910 Ipswich map but was probably constructed or moved to this location soon after.
10 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 10 Mineral Street, the W. Smith house (c 1860) - The 1872 Ipswich map and the 1884 map show a house at this location owned by "W. Smith." In the 1910 map, the owner is J. A. Smith.
53 Washington St. 53 Washington Street, the George W. Smith – Pickard House, (1880) - The earliest owner to be identified is George W. Smith who owned the house by 1884, and is listed in town directories as a flagman for the railroad. By 1910 the property was owned by Henry A. Pickard .
44 Washington St. 44 Washington St., the Howard Hills house (1905) - The house at 44 Washington Street was built between 1902 and 1907, and was constructed for Howard S. Hills who was manager of Russell’s Ideal Lunch at Depot Square.
42 Washington Street 42 Washington Street, DJ’s Variety Store (1938) - This small grocery store was built between 1936 and 1940, and was operated by Christ G. Geanakos as a grocery store. Geanakos lived at 1 Burley Avenue.
35 Washington Street 35 Washington Street, the Charles and Margaret Bell house (c 1890) - These identical houses were built for Charles E. and John A. Brown, who were involved in speculative development on Brown and Liberty Streets. By 1916 this house was occupied by Charles H. & Margaret J. Bell.
24 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 24 Manning Street (1932) -  The Ipswich assessors databases shows the date of construction as 1932.
23 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 23 Manning Street (1934) - The Ipswich Assessors database shows the date of construction as 1934.
21 Manning St., Ipswich MA 21 Manning Street - The date of construction for this house is uncertain. The Ipswich assessors database shows the date of construction as 1990.  The 1893 Ipswich birdseye map and 1910 map shows show a utilitarian structure at this location, which may have been converted or a new house placed on an older foundation.
18 Manning Street 18-20 Manning Street (1902) - 18-20 Manning St. is believed to have been constructed in 1902 and was owned by G. A. Lord in the 1910 Ipswich map. A different structure is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map.
17 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 17 Manning Street, the Candlewood School (1856) - Records indicate that the 1856 schoolhouse on Candlewood Road was moved to this location and enlarged in 1905 to relieve overcrowding in the original Winthrop School. . The form of construction predates the Victorian style of the other houses on the street.
16 Manning st., Ipswich MA 16 Manning St. (c 1900) - 16 Manning St., circa 1900. G. A. Lord owned this house, another one house next door and one on High St.
15 Manning St., Ipswich MA 15 Manning Street (c 1920) - The Ipswich assessors database provides a date of 1920 for this house.
14 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 14 Manning Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Manning Street does not appear in the 1910 Ipswich map, but based on the architectural characteristics in common with other houses on the street is presumed to have been constructed shortly thereafter.
13 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 13 Manning St., the Fields house, (c. 1900) - 13 Manning St., is owned by “Mrs. Fields” in the 1910 map. The town assessors database gives the date of construction as 1870. However, the 1884 Ipswich map shows no houses yet constructed on the street, which had not even been added in the 1872 map.
12 Manning St., Ipswich MA 12 Manning Street, the Edward T. Pike house (1885) - The mortgage for this house was taken out in 1885. Almost all of the houses on Manning Street appear in the 1893 Ipswich map.
10 Manning St., Ipswich MA 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) - 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) Like most of the houses on Manning Street, this house first appears in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich. In the 1910 Ipswich map the owner is G. Haskell.
9 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 9 Manning St., the Albert P. Hills house (c. 1890) - Like many of the houses on Manning Street, it first appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Hills owned a grocery on North Main Street. E. W.Russell was the owner in the 1910 Ipswich map.
8 Manning St, Ipswich MA 8 Manning Street, the Jordan house, (c. 1890) - This house first appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map.
7 Manning St. 7 Manning St., the E W. Russell house (c 1890) -  The house at 7 Manning St. appears first in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner as E W. Russell, who worked as a dyer at the Ipswich Mills.
3 Manning Street, Ipswich MA. 3 Manning St. (after 1910) - 3 Manning Street. An empty lot is shown on the 1910 Ipswich map, owned by E. W. Russell.
18 Liberty St. (1885) - The houses at #16 and # 18 Liberty Street were built between 1884 and 1887 by John A. Brown, a brick manufacturer and lumber dealer, probably in association with C.E. Brown & Son.
16 Liberty St. 16 Liberty St., the Martha Curtis house (1885) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owners as John Brown.
17 Liberty St., the Blaisdell house (c 1880) - The 1872 Ipswich map shows the owner of this house as "L. Blaisdell."
15 Liberty St. 15 Liberty St. (c 1870) - The earliest identified owner is C.W. Davis who owned the house by 1872. By 1884 the house had been sold to John W. Russell, a freight agent, who continued to own the house into the 1920’s.
13 Liberty St. Roberts house, 13 Liberty St. (c 1900) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 13 Liberty St. as D. A. Roberts.
12 Liberty St. 12 Liberty St. (c 1890) - The earliest Identified owner is Charles E. Brown, proprietor who owned the house by 1910. Brown and his son, Walter 6. Brown, operated a brick manufactory and contracting company.
10 Liberty Street The Brown house, 10 Liberty St. (c 1900) - The house at 10 Center Street is not in the 1884 Ipswich map, but appears in the 1910 Ipswich map under the name "C. Brown."
9 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 9 Liberty St. (c. 1880) - This house first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as "Mrs. Foster." It is also shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map, but not in the 1872 map. The owner in the 1910 Ipswich map is T. H. Lord. 
7 Liberty St. Ipswich MA 7 Liberty St., the John W. and Annie M. Lord house (C 1867) - The house at 7 Liberty St. first appears in the 1872. and was first owned by John W. Lord and his wife Annie M. Pingree.
6 Liberty St. (c. 1890) - A house at 6 Liberty St. is shown in the 1893 Birdseye map and the 1910 Ipswich map, the owner is shown as "C. Caldwell." The modestly Italianate "Gable and Ell" form confirm the architectural period.
3 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 3 Liberty St., the Foster house (c 1880) - This house is shown in the 1872 and 1884 Ipswich maps owned by "S. Foster."
87 Central St., Ipswich MA 87 Central Street (c 1890) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 87 Central Street as"Misses Peatsfield." The house is almost identical in construction to the house at 89 Central Street, which is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map.
1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich The Central Street Victorian neighborhood - Central Street was laid out in 1870, Manning High School opened 4 years later, and stores began to be constructed. By 1884, the Victorian neighborhoods that line Central, Hammatt, Manning, Mineral and Liberty Streets had been created.
A complete list of Ipswich enlistments in the Civil War - This list of enlistments of men who served in the military from Ipswich during the Civil War was produced by Scott Jewell in his book, Ipswich in the Civil War. The list was compiled and cross checked from Grand Army of the Republic records, regimental histories, and Civil War records.
98 Central Street 98 Central Street, the William and Abigail Haskell house (b 1884) - This house first appears under the name William Haskell in the 1884 Ipswich map.The house is shown as “A. Damon” in the 1910 map. It is also shown in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich.
97 Central Street 97 Central Street, the Mary Newton house (c 1890) - This house was constructed after the 1884 Ipswich map, with stick-style Victorian decorative features. The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner as "Mrs. Newton."
91 Central Street 91 Central Street, the Sylvanius and Mary Canney house (c 1866) - The house at this location first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map under the name "S. F. Canney." Sylvanius F. Canney purchased the lot in 1866, and sold the house and land to Israel Jewett in 1869. 
90 Central Street 90 Central Street, the Brown-Riley house (1897) - Deeds: Salem Deeds book 1517, page 254: Abbie Lord to Maria Brown, June 3, 1897. Sale of a parcel of land for $700. Salem Deeds book 1841, page 185: James Brown to Adelle Riley, 1906. Sale of parcel of land with house thereon. Salem Deeds book 2932 page […]
80 Central Street 80 Central Street, the Malachi Nolan house (1877) - Dr. Asabel Wildes sold three small lots to Malachi Nolan who appears to have build this house in 1877. His daughter Mary Marshall sold the combined lots with the building to Charles A Sayward in 1911.
79 Central Street 79 Central Street, the Foster Russell Jr. house (1883) - John Cogswell sold this lot without a house for $300 to Augustus Russell and Foster Russell Jr. in 1883 (book 1110, page 078). This house appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map; the 1884 and 1910 Ipswich maps show the owner of the house as Foster Russell Jr. […]
52 Central Street 52 Central Street, the Scahill house (c 1920) - This house doesn’t appear in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map and doesn’t match the house shown in the 1910 Ipswich map. The date of construction is uncertain, but a building at this location was the barber shop owned by barber Thomas Scahill in the Directory of the Town of […]
44 Central Street 44 Central St., the Ellen V. Lang house (c 1885) - The 1884 Ipswich map shows a house set back from Central St., belonging to “Mrs. Wildes.” In 1888, The Agawam Manual and Directory by M.V. B. Perley, shows the following residences: Lang E. V. Mrs, Central corner of Hammatt Lang George T, clerk (Boston) h Central corner of […]
111 Central Street 111 Central Street, the Albert and Annie Garland house (1894) - The house at 111 Central St. first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as A. S. Garland. Albert J. Garland, Edward Lord and Edward Baxter received a mortgage for the lot “with a new building thereon” in 1894 (Book 1432, page 305). Henry Garland was […]
110 Central Street 110 Central Street, the Samuel Baker house (before 1884) - Three identical houses with mansard roofs appear in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map and are still standing. The 1884 Ipswich map shows this house owned by “S. H. Baker” and the one next door owned by “G. H. Baker.” Samuel Baker and other parties conveyed “a certain parcel […]
109 Central Street 109 Central Street, Daniel and Mary Collins house (1873) - The house at 109 Central St. appears in the 1884 Ipswich map as “Collins,” and is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Daniel Collins deeded the house to his “loving daughter” Mary Collins in 1887.  The “parcel of land” “on the new road” was conveyed by Nathan […]
101 Central Street 101 Central Street, Newton house (c 1900) - This house first appears in the 1910 Ipswich map on the same lot with the house in front, labeled, “Mrs. Newton.” Sources: Mary Newton to Arthur Bishop, 1908 Salem Deeds, book 1930, page 300 1910 Ipswich map Salem Deeds, 3502/452: Ernest Harding to Dorothy Barney, 1946
30 Candlewood Rd. 30 Candlewood Rd., the Ephraim Brown house (1825) - More homes of the Brown family in Ipswich
16 Brown St. 16 Brown St., the Leno house (1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.
14 Brown St. 14 Brown St., Mitchell-Ralph house (c 1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.
12 Brown St. 12 Brown St. (c 1890) - Several homes on this street were built by the short-lived Essex Hosiery Company to house their employees. The house is typical of the vernacular Victorian "gable with ell" homes built at the end of the 19th Century on Brown, Cottage and Mineral Streets.
19 Brown Square 19 Brown Square (1903) - Harold Bowen wrote that this building was constructed from bricks that were saved from where the parking lot is now for the Ipswich Inn opposite N. Main st.
Liberty Street
Liberty Street

Liberty Street

Liberty St. Gothic Revival house, Ipswich 11 Liberty Street, the Levi Howe house (c 1870) - The descendants of Levi L. Howe, a farmer, owned this Gothic Revival cottage until 1953. Ken Savoie restored its appearance, and was the winner of the 1992 Mary Conley Award for historic preservation.
12 Liberty St. 12 Liberty St. (c 1890) - The earliest Identified owner is Charles E. Brown, proprietor who owned the house by 1910. Brown and his son, Walter 6. Brown, operated a brick manufactory and contracting company.
14 Liberty Street, the George B. Brown house (1898) 14 Liberty Street, the George B. Brown house (1898) - The elegant Victorian house at 14 Liberty Street in Ipswich was built between 1896-98 by George B. Brown, who owned a grain mill on Washington Street.
15 Liberty St. 15 Liberty St. (c 1870) - The earliest identified owner is C.W. Davis who owned the house by 1872. By 1884 the house had been sold to John W. Russell, a freight agent, who continued to own the house into the 1920’s.
16 Liberty St. 16 Liberty St., the Martha Curtis house (1885) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owners as John Brown.
17 Liberty St., the Blaisdell house (c 1880) - The 1872 Ipswich map shows the owner of this house as "L. Blaisdell."
18 Liberty St. (1885) - The houses at #16 and # 18 Liberty Street were built between 1884 and 1887 by John A. Brown, a brick manufacturer and lumber dealer, probably in association with C.E. Brown & Son.
3 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 3 Liberty St., the Foster house (c 1880) - This house is shown in the 1872 and 1884 Ipswich maps owned by "S. Foster."
6 Liberty St. (c. 1890) - A house at 6 Liberty St. is shown in the 1893 Birdseye map and the 1910 Ipswich map, the owner is shown as "C. Caldwell." The modestly Italianate "Gable and Ell" form confirm the architectural period.
7 Liberty St. Ipswich MA 7 Liberty St., the John W. and Annie M. Lord house (C 1867) - The house at 7 Liberty St. first appears in the 1872. and was first owned by John W. Lord and his wife Annie M. Pingree.
9 Liberty St., Ipswich MA 9 Liberty St. (c. 1880) - This house first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, with the owner shown as "Mrs. Foster." It is also shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map, but not in the 1872 map. The owner in the 1910 Ipswich map is T. H. Lord. 
3 Liberty St, Ipswich MA Liberty Street - In the late 19th Century Washington Street was extended to Linebrook Road, and Liberty Street became its own street. Its houses date to 1850-1910.
13 Liberty St. Roberts house, 13 Liberty St. (c 1900) - The 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner of the house at 13 Liberty St. as D. A. Roberts.
10 Liberty Street The Brown house, 10 Liberty St. (c 1900) - The house at 10 Center Street is not in the 1884 Ipswich map, but appears in the 1910 Ipswich map under the name "C. Brown."

Manning Street

1 Manning Street, the E.H. Martin house (1880) - The E. H. Martin house originally faced Central Street. It was moved back one lot and turned to face Manning St.
10 Manning St., Ipswich MA 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) - 10 Manning Street, the G. Haskell house (circa 1890) Like most of the houses on Manning Street, this house first appears in the 1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich. In the 1910 Ipswich map the owner is G. Haskell.
12 Manning St., Ipswich MA 12 Manning Street, the Edward T. Pike house (1885) - The mortgage for this house was taken out in 1885. Almost all of the houses on Manning Street appear in the 1893 Ipswich map.
13 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 13 Manning St., the Fields house, (c. 1900) - 13 Manning St., is owned by “Mrs. Fields” in the 1910 map. The town assessors database gives the date of construction as 1870. However, the 1884 Ipswich map shows no houses yet constructed on the street, which had not even been added in the 1872 map.
14 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 14 Manning Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Manning Street does not appear in the 1910 Ipswich map, but based on the architectural characteristics in common with other houses on the street is presumed to have been constructed shortly thereafter.
15 Manning St., Ipswich MA 15 Manning Street (c 1920) - The Ipswich assessors database provides a date of 1920 for this house.
16 Manning st., Ipswich MA 16 Manning St. (c 1900) - 16 Manning St., circa 1900. G. A. Lord owned this house, another one house next door and one on High St.
17 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 17 Manning Street, the Candlewood School (1856) - Records indicate that the 1856 schoolhouse on Candlewood Road was moved to this location and enlarged in 1905 to relieve overcrowding in the original Winthrop School. . The form of construction predates the Victorian style of the other houses on the street.
18 Manning Street 18-20 Manning Street (1902) - 18-20 Manning St. is believed to have been constructed in 1902 and was owned by G. A. Lord in the 1910 Ipswich map. A different structure is shown in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map.
21 Manning St., Ipswich MA 21 Manning Street - The date of construction for this house is uncertain. The Ipswich assessors database shows the date of construction as 1990.  The 1893 Ipswich birdseye map and 1910 map shows show a utilitarian structure at this location, which may have been converted or a new house placed on an older foundation.
23 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 23 Manning Street (1934) - The Ipswich Assessors database shows the date of construction as 1934.
24 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 24 Manning Street (1932) -  The Ipswich assessors databases shows the date of construction as 1932.
26 Manning Street, the Sullivan house (1927) - The 17th Century Caleb Lord house on the corner of High and Manning Streets was removed in 1927 and was replaced by the home of Bernard Sullivan. This is a modified form of the "American foursquare" house of the 1920's and 30's.
3 Manning Street, Ipswich MA. 3 Manning St. (after 1910) - 3 Manning Street. An empty lot is shown on the 1910 Ipswich map, owned by E. W. Russell.
6 Manning Street, the H. K. Damon house (1890) 6 Manning Street, the H. K. Damon house (1890) - This 1890 Victorian house features a third floor porch, slate shingles, 10-foot ceilings, two stain glass windows, oak floors, original moldings and pocket doors.
7 Manning St. 7 Manning St., the E W. Russell house (c 1890) -  The house at 7 Manning St. appears first in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. 1910 Ipswich map shows the owner as E W. Russell, who worked as a dyer at the Ipswich Mills.
8 Manning St, Ipswich MA 8 Manning Street, the Jordan house, (c. 1890) - This house first appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map.
9 Manning Street, Ipswich MA 9 Manning St., the Albert P. Hills house (c. 1890) - Like many of the houses on Manning Street, it first appears in the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye map. Hills owned a grocery on North Main Street. E. W.Russell was the owner in the 1910 Ipswich map.
Manning Street from the 1893 Birdeye Map of Ipswich. Manning Street, a Victorian neighborhood - Central Street was laid out in 1872, and Manning Street in 1882. Manning Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, newly created, with no houses yet. The 1910 Ipswich map shows all of the houses now on the street, and Warren Street has been extended from North Main to Manning Street. 
Maple Avenue, Ipswich
Maple Ave.

Maple Avenue

16 Maple St., Ipswich MA 16 Maple Avenue, the William H. Bodwell house, 1890 - In 1891 this house appears on maps under the ownership of William H. Bodwell, a carpenter.
3 Maple St., Ipswich 3 Maple Avenue, the Harland and Blanche Burke house (1916) - Harland Burke was a superintendent at F.L. Burke & Son, heel manufacturers whose factory was at Brown Square.
4 Maple St., Ipswich MA 4 Maple Avenue, the Arthur H. and Madeline H. Tozer house (1915) - Arthur Tozer was a music teacher for the public schools and apparently worked out of his home. Prior to construction of this house, land on which it stands was part of a larger parcel belonging to G. Tozer.
4 Maple St., Ipswich MA 5 Maple Avenue, the G. Baxter – Frank Campbell house (1890) - This small house features chamfered posts, brackets, and spindle friezes. The houses at 3 and 5 Newmarch Street in Ipswich are identical to 5 Maple Ave., all constructed between 1870 and 1890.
G. Tozier house, 6-8 Maple Street, circa 1890 6-8 Maple Ave., the George Tozer house (circa 1890) - Maple Street first appears in the 1884 Ipswich map, without houses. George Tozer constructed this large house when the Washington Street neighborhood section behind it was still farmland.

Mineral Street

10 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 10 Mineral Street, the W. Smith house (c 1860) - The 1872 Ipswich map and the 1884 map show a house at this location owned by "W. Smith." In the 1910 map, the owner is J. A. Smith.
14 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 14 Mineral Street (c 1915) - The house at 14 Mineral Street does not appear on the 1910 Ipswich map but was probably constructed or moved to this location soon after.
16 Mineral Street, Wise Saddle Shop (c1742 (?) /1801) - Jabez Farley sold this lot to Joseph and John Wise in 1801, who probably built this small dwelling shortly thereafter. As late as 1832, this was the only house on Mineral Street.
17 Mineral Street Ipswich 17 Mineral Street, c 1885; Baxter-Adamowicz house - This house is part of what was a double lot, constructed in the early 1880's by J. J Philbrook, who sold it soon thereafter to Edward H. Baxter. The Adamowitz family have owned it since 1926.
19 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 19 Mineral Street (1856) - In 1856, Mary Lord Baker, widow of Stephen W. Baker transferred 1 1/2 acres including this lot to Mary Philbrook. The Philbrook family constructed a house on the property, which appears in the 1872 Ipswich map.
20 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 20 Mineral Street, the Lucy Ackerman house (c 1870) - This house began as a story and a half Mansard cottage, with the Mineral Street wing added later. The small front mansard cottage is shown in the 1872 map with the name "Mrs. L. Ackerman,"
22 Mineral Street, the Ephraim Harris House (1696, alt. 1835) - The earliest sections of this house were built by Daniel Warner in 1696 on Market Street. In 1835, Ephraim Harris, builder, was commissioned by Capt. Robert Kimball to build a new house on the lot. Harris removed a portion of the Warner house to his own land at the corner of Central and Mineral Streets, and enlarged it.
23 Mineral Street 23 Mineral Street, the Lydia and Joseph Lord house (1871) - Andrew Geyer purchased the lot in 1871 and in 1873 sold the lot with a house on it to Lydia and Josiah Lord. 
26 Mineral Street 26 Mineral Street (c 1870) - In the 1872 map, this house and the house at 22 Mineral Street are owned by Ephraim Harris, but only the latter appears in the 1856 map. By 1910 both houses were owned by Mrs. A. Spiller.
28 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 28 Mineral Street (c 1880) - The house at 28 Mineral St. is shown in the 1884 Ipswich map and the 1893 Ipswich Birdseye Map. The owner's name is shown as "Miss Moore.
3 Mineral Street, Ipswich 3 Mineral Street, the Charles H. Baker house (c 1870) - The house at 3 Mineral Street was constructed between publications of the 1856 and 1872 Ipswich maps. The earliest owner to be identified is Charles H. Baker who owned the house by 1884. Baker is listed is town directories as a "flagman", possibly for the local branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 
31 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 31 Mineral Street (c 1870) - This house first appears in the 1872 Ipswich map. The first owner is shown as "Caldwell." "Gable and Wing" houses with Italianate Victorian woodwork are found throughout Ipswich dating to the period from 1860-1880.
33 Mineral Street, Ipswich MA 33 Mineral Street, the Caroline Norman house, 1884 (moved from Central St.) - The house at 33 Mineral Street was moved from the location of Cumberland Farms on Central street in Ipswich.
35 Mineral Street, Ipswich 35 Mineral Street, the Smith house (c 1835) - The Ipswich Assessors map shows the date of construction as 1823, but it first appears in the 1856 Ipswich map, and continues into the 20th Century as the Smith house.
39 Mineral Street, Ipswich 39 Mineral Street (c 1920) - The building at this location in the 1910 Ipswich map was a two story barn or storage building belonging to the Smith family. It is unclear if this is the same structure converted into a residence.

Washington Street

10 Washington St. 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770) - The house was constructed before 1770 at 45 N. Main St., and was moved to this location in 1860 by Michael Ready. The second floor was probably added at that time.
Patrick Riley House, 12 Washington St. 12 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (1880) - This house was built between 1872 and 1884 for Patrick and Ellen Riley. Riley was a farmer and he and his wife owned this house and the one at #16. By 1924 this house was occupied by Maurice and Mary Blaquiere.
Patrick Riley House on Washington Street, Ipswich MA 16 Washington Street, the Patrick Riley house (c 1865) - Patrick Riley is listed in town directories as a farmer. By 1924 this house was occupied by Isaac W. Mitchell, a carpenter.
18 Washington St., Ipswich MA 18 Washington Street, Sanford Peatfield House (1860) - This house was built for Sanford and Mary Peatfield around 1860. Sanford and James Peatfield built a brick mill on Washington Street and continued making woolen underwear until about 1877. The factory became the Hayes Hotel, and burned in the 20th Century.
31 Washington St., the Laffy – Chapman – Morrill house (c 1880) - This house was built between 1872 and 1884. By 1884 it was owned by Michael Laffy; Laffy is listed in town directories as a laborer. By 1910 the house was owned by Walter Chapman, a farmer who lived on Pineswamp Road and presumably rented this house. In 1916 the house was occupied by Euclid A. and Charolette B. Morrill. In 1924 it was occupied by Insurance agent William F. Connor and his wife Mary.
31 Washington Street, the George Brown house (1883) - John A. Brown sold this lot to George B. Brown in 1883 and he built a house shortly thereafter. Brown’s house is one of the few Stick Style Victorian homes in Ipswich. Brown built a grist mill, also located on Washington St., in 1881. He started with a single team and by 1888 employed 6 men. Brown was the first in the area to install a roller mill, which removed all foreign iron substances from the grain before it entered the mill
32 Washington Street, the Frederick Bray – Daniel Nourse House (c 1870) - The first owner of this house, built around 1865 was Frederick Bray, a Civil War veteran. By 1884 it was owned by Daniel P. and Sarah Nourse. Nourse died by 1888 and the house was sold. By 1916 it was occupied by Dennis and Nora Monahan. Dennis is listed in town directories as a mason.
35 Washington Street 35 Washington Street, the Charles and Margaret Bell house (c 1890) - These identical houses were built for Charles E. and John A. Brown, who were involved in speculative development on Brown and Liberty Streets. By 1916 this house was occupied by Charles H. & Margaret J. Bell.
37 Washington Street, the Brown-Grossman-Doucette house (1884) - This house was built by 1884 by George V. Brown, one of several houses he built on a large parcel. Brown operated a large hay & grain business nearby at Brown Square and lived on Liberty Street. In 1916 this house was occupied by Charles (& Mary) Grossman and Denis (& Maggie) Doucette.
42 Washington Street 42 Washington Street, DJ’s Variety Store (1938) - This small grocery store was built between 1936 and 1940, and was operated by Christ G. Geanakos as a grocery store. Geanakos lived at 1 Burley Avenue.
44 Washington St. 44 Washington St., the Howard Hills house (1905) - The house at 44 Washington Street was built between 1902 and 1907, and was constructed for Howard S. Hills who was manager of Russell’s Ideal Lunch at Depot Square.
46 Washington St. 46 Washington Street, the James S. Marble- James Peatfield house (1860) - This two-family house was came into the possession of Sanford and James Peatfield in 1859. James Peatfield came to America in 1827. He built one of the first lace machines in this country, and invented a warp machine, after which he began manufacturing woolen underwear. Together with his brother, Sanford, Peatfield built a brick mill on Washington Street.
53 Washington St. 53 Washington Street, the George W. Smith – Pickard House, (1880) - The earliest owner to be identified is George W. Smith who owned the house by 1884, and is listed in town directories as a flagman for the railroad. By 1910 the property was owned by Henry A. Pickard .
56 Washington St. 56 Washington Street, the Ephraim Goodhue House (1875) - The earliest owner of the house was Ephraim Goodhue, listed in town directories as a blacksmith and grocer with a shop on Pleasant Street. By 1902 the house had been converted to two-family use.
Washington St., Ipswich 59 Washington Street, the Charles W. Bamford house (C 1887) - This house was built between 1884 and 1888 for Charles W. Bamford, who was at various times in his career the Town Clerk, Treasurer, and Justice of the Peace. The elaborative cornices and multiple colors of paint are a mix of Italianate and Queen Anne Victorian.
62 Washington St., the Robert Stone house (1869) - 62 Washington St., Ipswich MA
78 Washington St. 78 Washington Street, the Daniel Haskell House (1835) - The Federal trim and substantial chimneys identify this house as perhaps the earliest of the story-and-one-third 19th century cottages on Linebrook. It is uncertain which Daniel Haskell Sr. or Jr. was the owner. Records show that both died of dementia.
Most of the houses in the map above were built in the last half of the 19th Century, and includes Brown, Central, Cottage Liberty, Manning, Maple, Mineral, and Washington Streets.