The East End Historic District

east_end_map

Map of the East End Historic District from nomination papers

The Ipswich East End Historic District was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1980. View a complete description in the Nomination Report.
The East End includes the seafaring portion of the original village of Ipswich and offers an architectural history of the town’s development. It was here that the first houses were built in this town where fishing and lumbering were prominent industries. When settlers arrived in the 1630’s, wigwams, huts and hovels were constructed between Town Hill and what is now Town Wharf. The Ipswich River was the town’s avenue to the Atlantic.

Settlement remained concentrated in this area and the town rapidly grew and prospered. Wharves and warehouses were built along the riverbank. Water Street was the site of a custom house, pottery manufacturing, and an ancient tannery. Salt manufacture began in 1652, a brew house was built by 1663, and Moses Pengry established a shipyard in 1673. By 1676 ship building was an extensive industry. The River became the chief highway of commerce as far inland as Falls Island (eradicated when the County St. bridge was built in 1861). Fishing and lumbering became prominent. Staves, clapboards, masts, timbers for houses, and fish were shipped to foreign ports.

Summer

View of Summer and Water Streets from across the river

The general lack of new building late in the 18th century reveals the economic hardships Ipswich faced at this time. The 1830’s heralded the Industrial Revolution in Ipswich and new buildings followed on the heels of successful textile mills. Lower County St., once pasture land, was improved in 1861 when a new bridge was built, linking the South Green area and the East End. The 1830s was one of the most prosperous periods in Ipswich history. The Industrial Revolution and new buildings followed on the heels of successful textile mills.

Thriving merchants built fine Victorian homes during this era, attesting to the prosperity of the town and the rising middle class. Five Second-Empire homes were built between 1860 and 1870. This marked the final stage of development for the East End. Today the East End is predominantly residential and includes over 60 examples of period architecture contributing to the character of the historic district.

Physical boundaries: The East End is bounded on the north and west by East Street. That street extends from the High-North Main Streets intersection on the west to Jeffrey’s Neck Road on the north, skirting Town Hill. The River and its eastern bank (Turkey Shore Road) form the eastern boundary of the district from Town Wharf to the Green Street Bridge. Green Street is the southern edge of the District, enclosing Water, Summer and Hovey Streets and Agawam Avenue, and a major portion of County Street. The East End is now predominantly residential and includes over 60 fully surveyed historic houses.

Ipswich River 1860

Houses in the East End listed by address, house name and date built. Susan Nelson’s detailed listing for the Ipswich Historical Commission is the source of much of the information for dates and descriptions of the houses listed below.

County Street

35 County St., Ipswich MA 35 County St., the Lydia and Reuben Daniels house (1863) - The house was build by Reuben Daniels, surveyor and shoe manufacturer, and his wife Lydia.
Holland-Cogswell house, corner of Green and County Streets, Ipswich MA 9 Green Street, the Elizabeth Holland house (1811) - The house on the southeast corner of County Street was built by Elizabeth Holland on Meeting House Green in 1811, and was moved to lot by John How Cogswell between 1872 and 1884.
3 County Street, Ipswich MA 3 County Street, the William Treadwell house (1850) - The house does not appear on the Ipswich maps through 1910, at which time this tiny parcel was owned by Dr. Russell. It may be a wing of the Captain William Treadwell house which was removed from the other corner of East Street in order to widen the intersection.
26 County St., J. M Dunnels house, Ipswich MA 26 County Street, the John M. Dunnels house (1867) - This home was constructed in approximately 1867 by J. M. Dunnels, who was a "tin and sheet iron worker" with a shop downtown.
Caldwell house, 25 County St., Ipswich 25 County Street, the J. Caldwell house (c 1860) - The house at 25 County Street in Ipswich was built in approximately 1860 on a corner of the former Ipswich Jail grounds. The 1872 Ipswich map shows the owner as J. Caldwell. In 1910 the owner is N. S. Kimball. 
County Street, Ipswich MA 17 County Street, Daniels Shoe Factory (1843) - This house was built in 1843 near the EBSCO dam as Hoyt’s Veneer Mill. It was moved in 1859 to its present location where it became the Perkins & Daniels Stocking Factory. Farley & Daniels succeeded in 1884. 
31 County Street, Ascension Memorial Episcopal Church (1875) - The Ascension Memorial Episcopal Church on County Street was designed by famed architect James Renwick Jr. (1818-1895) and is considered “American Gothic Revival” in style. Construction was begun in 1869 and completed in 1875.
45 County St, Ipswich MA 45 County Street, the Amos Dunnels house (1823) - The Amos Dunnels house was constructed in 1823 on South Main St. and was moved to 45 County St. in the 20th Century.
11 County Street, the Bennett – Caldwell house (1725) - Joseph Bennett built this early Second Period house in 1725. In 1818 the house was sold to Capt. Sylvanus Caldwell, who engaged in maritime trade along the coast from Massachusetts to Maine for a half century.
Pinder-Rindge house, Summer St., Ipswich 5 County Street, the Richard Rindge house (1718) - The First Period house at 5 County Street was originally on upper Summer St., moved to this location in the last half of the 19th Century.
10 County Street, the Dennis – Dodge House (1740) - The 1740 Dennis-Dodge house was owned by Captain John Dennis, whose father Thomas Dennis was a renowned woodworker and owned a home across the street. A succession of Dennis family members retained this property. Captain Ignatius Dodge (1816 - 1901) inherited the house. In the early 1800's, Eunice Hale maintained a school in the building.
9 County Street, the Benjamin Dutch house (1705) - This was built early in the 1700’s, and was owned by one of several men named Benjamin Dutch who owned and sold properties throughout town. The asymmetrical facade and timber frame are typical of First Period construction.
16 County Street, the Abraham Knowlton house (1726) 16 County Street, the Abraham Knowlton house (1726) - The original house is believed to have been constructed between 1725 and 1740. The house was in poor condition and in 2003 was restored by Ipswich architect Matthew Cummings. It is identical in construction to the Dennis-Dodge house a few doors away.
15 County Street, the Rev. Levi Frisbie house (1788) - This house at 15 County Street was built in 1788 for Rev. Levi Frisbie, pastor of First Church in Ipswich. He continued in the pastorate thirty years until his death in 1806, succeeded by the Rev. David Tenney Kimball.
The Benjamin Grant house, County Street in Ipswich MA 47 County Street, the Benjamin Grant house (1723) - The Benjamin Grant House was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. It appears to have been originally built as a half house. Benjamin Grant was born in 1701 in Ipswich to Robert and Mary Grant, who emigrated from England. Benjamin married Anne Perkins in 1722, and was killed in the French and Indian War in 1756.
7 County Street, the Thomas Dennis House (1663) - Shoreborne Wilson, a cooper, built a house and shop on this site about 1660. Thomas Dennis, the well-known master joiner, bought the property in 1663. The rear ell of the present house dates from that period, The 5-bay front section of the house dates to the 1750's.

East Street

55 East St., Ipswich MA 55 East St. (c 1922) - This house is said to have been constructed from the front left section of Asa Lord's store when it was removed from Lord Square in the 1920's.
4 East St., Ipswich MA 4 East St., the old Methodist Parsonage, 1830 - The house at 4 East Street was constructed about 1830 and served as the Methodist Parsonage. The first sanctuary of the Methodist Church was located next door at the location of the present-day Ipswich Inn.
42 East Street, Ipswich MA 42 East Street, the Joseph Hovey house (1850) - Joseph Hovey bought a lot in 1843 from the estate of Thomas Boardman, and an adjoining lot in the rear at about the same time from J. H. Boardman. The old Boardman house was torn down about 1850, and Joseph Hovey built a house on the lot, which appears in the 1856 map.
48 East St., Ipswich MA 48 East St., the Tyler Caldwell house (1860) - Tyler Caldwell was "a man of thrift and industry, and amassed a comfortable property; respected in the town and well-beloved in the neighborhood where he lived."
13 East St., Ipswich MA 13 East St., Ignatius Dodge – F. Lord house (1856) - On the 1856 map this appears to be the "Ignatius Dodge Shoe Shop." The 1910 Ipswich map shows #13 East Street is owned by "F. Lord."
3 East St., Ipswich MA the J. W. Perkins house 3 East Street, the James W. Perkins house and Provisions (1860) - This house was built between 1856 and 1872. Samuel Hunt purchased the ancient Day-Dodge house at the corner of North Main and East Streets on Feb. 14, 1849 with three lots adjoining. The 1856 Ipswich map shows Burroughs Machine Shop at this location. The 1896 Ipswich Business Directory lists J.W. Perkins, Provisions and Meat Market at this location on East Street.
15 East Street, Ipswich MA 15 East Street: Dawson’s Bakery; James and Louise Glover house (c 1870) - The house at #15 East Street may have been a small shop before it was converted to residences. The 1872 map shows the building at this location as “Dawson Bakery.”
25 East St., Ipswich MA the Stanwood-Willcomb house 25 East St, the Stanwood-Willcomb house (1830) - Stephen Stanwood erected this house in 1830 for a fulling mill. Sheep grazed on the bare hills above East and High Streets, and the mill used water that ran from the springs. This is said to be the first house in town to have running water. Fred Willcomb and his brother Lewis E. Willcomb operated a store here at Willcomb's Corner.
78 East St., Ipswich MA 78 East Street, the James Glover hosiery factory (c 1860) - James Glover came to Ipswich from England with a long warp weaving machine about 1845. He worked at the Lower Mills until he opened his own textile factory ca. 1860. He manufactured hairnets, knit goods, hoods, and shawls. Glover employed 40-50 hands in the Civil War period, but by 1897 the mill was closed.
G. Russell house, 21 East St., Ipswich MA 21 East Street, the George Russell house (c 1870) - The first known owner of this house was George Russell, (1823-1884) a mason. His parents were Daniel Russell and Mary Lakeman.
27 East St., Ipswich MA 27 East Street, the Widow Elizabeth Caldwell house (1740-1755) - Joseph Wait sold this lot to Elizabeth Caldwell, widow of Thomas, in 1829. She moved a house from another site onto her property. The rear two story wing is believed to be the older house, joined together when the house was moved. Structural evidence suggest a construction dates of about 1740 to 1775 for the two sections.
44 East St, Ipswich MA 44 East Street, the John Roberts house (c 1870) - The Ipswich Historical Commission records the date of construction as 1856/1872 by John Roberts, through the marriage of Mary Elizabeth Hovey (1843-1928) to John Roberts (1824-1903).
Foster Russell house, 9 East St. Ipswich MA 9 East Street, the Foster Russell house (1856) - Samuel Hunt sold a half acre at the foot of his lot on East St. to Foster Russell and D. P. Nourse, May 9, 1855, and Mr. Russell and his wife Martha Hodgkins built this house.
33 East St., the Old Store (1830) - The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 near the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby, and was moved to this location in 1850 by Joseph Wait.
26 East Street, the Staniford – Polly Dole -John Updike house (1687-1720) - Part of this house was constructed in 1687 for Deacon John Staniford and his wife Margaret. It acquired its current form in 1720. This was the home of writer John Updike, and has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
6 East Street, the Daniel Russell house (1818) - In 1818 Daniel Russell bought the land with the old Norton - Cobbet house on it, the home of two of the first pastors of the First Church in Ipswich. Daniel Russell, the son of Henry and Mary Lord Russell. Daniel Russell was born in Ipswich on August 14, 1767 and died on December 29 1837, having lived 70 years. His wife was Sarah Sutton.
7 East Street, the Sadie Stockwell house (1888) 7 East Street, the Sadie Stockwell house (1888) - The heirs of Samuel Hunt sold the building lot to Sadie B. Stockwell and her husband Frank Stockwell, dentist on April 27, 1888 and she built the house on the lot in the same year.  The Queen Anne shingle-style home of the Victorian era is not common in Ipswich.
10 East Street, the Nathaniel Harris house (1819) 10 East Street, the Nathaniel Harris house (1819) - Nathaniel Harris built his home in 1819 on a section of land from the Baker Newman property next door. His widow Elizabeth Staniford lived into her 90's. The county laid a pipe connecting a spring on this land to the house of corrections on Meetinghouse Green.
22 East Street, Ipswich MA the Moses Fellows house 22 East Street, the Moses Fellows House (1873) - Thomas Sweet sold this lot to Moses A. Fellows and Sarah G. Hodgkins in 1873, and Fellows built this Italianate house shortly thereafter. Fellows owned a lumber yard on Water Street.
59 East Street, the Daniel Ringe house (1719) 59 East Street, the Daniel Ringe house (1719) - The small lot fronting on East Street was sold to Daniel Ringe, Oct. 16, 1719 . It was sold to John Holland, Nov. 6, 1742. Daniel Ringe was an early settler of Ipswich, and as a young man worked as a cow-herd. Captain Ringe was a soldier in the Indian wars and became a prominent citizen of Ipswich.
37 East Street, the Stephen Baker house (1834) - The small two story three bay colonial at 37 East Street was built in 1834 by Stephen Baker Jr. as a storehouse for his grocery. The lot was also used a lumber yard and Baker opened a way to the river, constructing a wharf at the end of the lane.
35 East Street, the Luther Wait house (1810) - In 1872 Luther Wait removed the County jailor's house to this location. Wait served on several town boards including the school committee and as town assessor, and served two terms as postmaster.
2 East Street, the Robert Jordan house (1863) 2 East Street, the Robert Jordan house (1863) - The “Old Brick,” the home of esteemed Col. Francis Wainwright was at this location in the 17th and early 18th Century. The original Methodist Church meeting house was erected here in the 1830's. Robert Jordan, a clothing merchant, bought this lot in 1862, and built this fine Italianate home. Dr. George C. Bailey was the next owner, but then built the large Victorian house at 48 Market Street in 1887.
The Lakeman house at 76 East Street 76 East Street, the Hodgkins – Lakeman House (c1690) - William Hodgkins built this house before 1700. In 1718 he sold the dwelling to Archelaus Lakeman and the property remained in the Lakeman family for almost 200 years. The Lakemans were a sea-faring family with extensive wharves and warehouses on the property and on the Town Wharf across the street.
38 East St. Ipswich MA 38 East Street, the John Harris house (1742) - Thomas Harris purchased land along East Street in 1665. His son John was deputy sheriff and transported accused witches to Salem for trial. This sizable Georgian house was built by John Harris, 3rd or 4th generation. The property descended to Capt. Stephen Baker, whose heirs owned into the 20th Century.
30 East Street, the Jordan – Snelling – Potter house (c 1708) 30 East Street, the Jordan – Snelling – Potter house (c 1708) - John Potter purchased the lot in 1708 with all the buildings, including the “old house, new out-houses, etc.” Structural evidence reveals that the house was built in two stages, and that the west side is the earliest portion. The house was owned in the 1950’s by Hollie Bucklin who renovated the building so that it appears to be a medieval revival cross-gabled house.
16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840) - This house was built between 1837 and 1846 when mariner Richard Lakeman sold the land “with the dwelling house and other buildings thereon,” to his brother, Captain Ebenezer “Eben” Lakeman. The house has an Asher Benjamin doorway and has a preservation agreement with Historic New England.
18 East Street, the Baker-Dodge house (1727) - This house was built by John Baker III, and was purchased by Mary Dennis Dodge in 1818. The house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the town of Ipswich.
Baker Newman house, East St. Ipswich MA 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725) - John Baker obtained a section of the land extending down East Street to Spring Street, originally granted to Rev. Cobbet. John Baker Jr. sold eight acres with buildings including land on the hillside to Nathaniel Jones Jr. in 1742. Jones sold the house and lot to George Newman Jr., a weaver.
Matthew Perkins house, 8 East Street, built in 1709 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1701) - Winner of the 1991 Mary Conley Award. this well-preserved 1st Period house sits on a former orchard lot that was sold in 1701 by Major Francis Wainwright to Matthew Perkins, a weaver and soldier. In 1719 Perkins opened an inn and tavern in this house, "at the sign of the blue anchor."
Wainwright-Treadwell house, East St., Ipswich MA 62 East Street, the Treadwell-Wainwright House (1691 / 1726) - Capt. John Wainwright bought 3 1/2 acres from Nathaniel Treadwell in 1710 and built part of this fine Georgian mansion, which features elaborate panels and molding, re-used summer beams, and a massive early fireplace.
Perkins-Hodgkins house, East Street in Ipswich 80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700) - The Perkins-Hodgkins house is believed to have been built in 1700 on the foundation of the earier Jacob Perkins home. The house has been greatly expanded over the years, but the original asymetrical structure continues to anchor the corner with Jeffreys Neck Road.

Green Street

John H. Perkins house, 2 Green Street Ipswich MA 2 Green Street, the John Perkins house (1860) - This corner was originally part of a larger lot owned by General Denison. Captain Treadwell and Nathaniel Lord Jr. were later owners, and then Mr. John Perkins, who built this house.
Holland-Cogswell house, corner of Green and County Streets, Ipswich MA 9 Green Street, the Elizabeth Holland house (1811) - The house on the southeast corner of County Street was built by Elizabeth Holland on Meeting House Green in 1811, and was moved to lot by John How Cogswell between 1872 and 1884.
Ipswich MA Town Hall on Green Street 30 Green Street, the Ipswich Town Hall (1935) - A large jail/insane asylum was built on the Green Street location in 1828. It was torn down in 1934 to make room for a new high school. The building now serves as the Ipswich Town Hall. The prison workhouse still stands and was remodeled into a senior residence center.
W. H.Graves house, 4 Green St., Ipswich 4 Green Street, the William H. Graves house (1852) - William H. Graves was born in 1821. At the age of 27 he was a cordwainer, and married Hannah S. Dodge.
18 Green Street, the Isaac Stanwood – Joanna Caldwell House (1812) 18 Green Street, the Isaac Stanwood – Joanna Caldwell House (1812) - Captain Isaac Stanwood was born in Ipswich, May 2, 1755. On January 24, 1775, he was enrolled among the Ipswich minute-men, and marched as a private in Captain Nathaniel Wade's company, in the alarm of April 19, 1775.
Andrew Burley house, Green St., Ipswich 12 Green Street, the Andrew Burley house (1688) - Andrew Burley bought this lot in 1683 and built a house shortly thereafter. He became a wealthy merchant and updated the house with fine Georgian features. Burley was a justice of the Sessions Court and was elected representative to the General Court in 1741. Capt. John Smith purchased the house in 1760 from the estate of Andrew Burley’s widow Hannah and operated it as Smith's Tavern.

Hovey Street

6 Hovey Street, the Thomas Foulds Ellsworth house (1866) 6 Hovey Street, the Thomas Foulds Ellsworth house (1866) - Captain Thomas Ellsworth built this house after purchasing the old Mansfield lot in 1866. He sold the property to Howard C. Dodge in 1887.
3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665) 3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665) - John Kenrick, a cooper by trade, owned this lot in 1665,. He and his son sold it to to Thomas Staniford in 1706. Structural evidence supports a construction date of about 1670. Much of the trim dates from the late 18th or early 19th centuries.

Scotton’s Lane

1 Scottons Lane, Ipswich MA 1 Scotton’s Lane, the Choate-Scotton house (c 1863) - In the year 1834, Charles Choate moved to Ipswich from Essex with his family and began building vessels at Baker’s Wharf. His sons Lewis and Edward took up the trade and continued the business. Amos Scotton immigrated to Boston and settled in Ipswich. He married Eliza Brown and had 8 children. He passed away on 1905 in Ipswich. His son Amos Scotton, an Ipswich jeweler and knit goods, purchased this property before 1910.

Summer Street

1 Scottons Lane, Ipswich MA 1 Scotton’s Lane, the Choate-Scotton house (c 1863) - In the year 1834, Charles Choate moved to Ipswich from Essex with his family and began building vessels at Baker’s Wharf. His sons Lewis and Edward took up the trade and continued the business. Amos Scotton immigrated to Boston and settled in Ipswich. He married Eliza Brown and had 8 children. He passed away on 1905 in Ipswich. His son Amos Scotton, an Ipswich jeweler and knit goods, purchased this property before 1910.

Turkey Shore

17 Turkey Shore, Ipswich MA 17 Turkey Shore Road, the John Edward Norman house (1895) - John E. Norman was in command of the ship "Rival" which was lot at sea with all hands in about 1870. The Captain was only twenty-eight years old, leaving a widow and a young family. This house is presumed to have been built by his son, John E. Norman, 2nd. John Edward Norman 3rd was born in 1897, served in the World War, and sold the house in 1935 to John H. Hill.
59 Turkey Shore Road, the Elizabeth and Otis Glover house (c 1870) - Elizabeth Glover, wife of Otis Glover, inherited the property at 59 Turkey Shore Road from her father, Abraham Soward. She moved the old house off the lot and built this large Queen Anne house on the location. Her husband Otis Glover was in the Civil War from 1861 to 1864, and lived until 1903.
49 Turkey Shore Road, the Austin Measures house (1874) - Austin Measures’ Candy Shop was first located in a small building on North Main Street, and later on Central Street. This house was built in 1874. The low-pitched roof, window hoods and corbels supporting the flat roof portico are of Italianate influence.
Nathaniel Hodgkins house, Turkey Shore Road 48 Turkey Shore Road, the Nathaniel Hodgkins house (c 1720) - This gambrel-roof house was built after Hodgkins bought the lot in 1720.The front original section. has late First Period construction, while the rear wing was moved and attached to it later.
63 Turkey Shore Road, the Isaac Foss house (1870) - Mary Appleton, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Appleton married, first, Mager Woodbury at 67 Turkey Shore Rd., and had two children. Mary Appleton Woodbury died in 1828; He died in October 1837. Their daughter Mary married Thomas McMahon at the old Abraham and Elizabeth Soward house at this site. […]
Boardman house, Turkey Shore Ipswich, 1725 67 Turkey Shore Road, the Stephen Boardman house (1720) - This house is named for Stephen Boardman, the son of Thomas Boardman and Sarah Langley. He and his wife Elizabeth Cogswell moved to Stratham, NH where he made a name for himself as a vocal supporter of the American revolution.The wide pine board floors in the house are original, and 4 restored fireplaces share a central chimney.
41 Turkey Shore Road, the Howard – Arthur Wesley Dow House (1680) - William Howard purchased this lot from Thomas Emerson in 1679 and built a half-house which was enlarged in 1709. From 1891 to 1906 Arthur Wesley Dow and his wife Minnie ran the Ipswich Summer School of Art in the house.
Burnam-Patch House, 1 Turkey Shore 1 Turkey Shore Road, the Burnham-Patch-Day house (1730) - This house has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission. The house was built by Thomas Burnham in 1730 on the foundation of the earlier house he bought in 1667. The large ell on Poplar Street was added in the early nineteenth-century. Abner Day bought the house of the heirs of John Patch in 1814 and kept a well-known tavern.
Heard-Lakeman house, Poplar St., Ipswich 2 Turkey Shore, the Heard – Lakeman House (1776) - Nathaniel and John Heard bought this land in 1776 and built the present house. Nathaniel sold the house to Richard Lakeman III in 1795. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, and has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.

Water Street

Water Street, painting by Arthur Wesley Dow Water Street - "Close by the river bank, on either side, a public way was sedulously preserved from any encroachment. On the north side of the river it still remains in Water Street,"
32 Water Street, the Jabesh Sweet house (1713) - Jabesh Sweet built this house on a quarter acre lot by the river at 32 Water Street in 1713. People said that the ghost of Harry Maine the Mooncusser haunted the house that once sat where the garage for this house now stands. He was found guilty and staked to the Ipswich Bar for eternity.
Jewett house, Water St., Ipswich 4 Water Street, the Jewett house (1849) - This house was built in 1849, framed with lumber taken from the 1747 Meeting House of the First Church when it was torn down, prior to the building of the Gothic church that stood on that location for a century.
36 Water St. Ipswich MA the York-Averill house 36 Water Street, the York – Averill House (1715) - Captain Samuel York built this house in 1715 after selling two smaller lots on East Street. The earliest portions of this house date from the early years of his ownership, Benjamin Averill, a Revolutionary War veteran, bought the house in 1793 and it remained in the Averill family until the late 19th century.
Harris house, Water St., Ipswich MA 28 Water Street, the Harris – Stanwood House (1696) - The Harris – Stanwood house was built in 1696 by John Harris. John Stanwood acquired the property in 1809 and it remained in his family for many years. The right wing was added c. 1884.
Glazier-Sweet house, 12 Water St. 12 Water Street, the Glazier – Sweet house (1728) - This house was built in 1728 by Benjamin Glazier, a sea captain, and transitions the First and Second Periods of Colonial construction. The original half house and early Beverly Jog addition remain intact, with later additions.
First Period house, Water St. Ipswich MA 6 Water Street, the Reginald Foster house (1690) - Ipswich deeds list the transfer of a house at this location from Roger Preston to Reginald Foster in 1657, but construction of this house dates to about 1690. Massive chamfered summer beams in the right section, the sharp-pitched roof and purlins provide evidence of the early date.
Harris-Sutton house, Water St. 8 Water Street, the Harris-Sutton House (1677) - Abner Harris bought this lot and enlarged the house in 1743. When the house was dismantled and reconstructed in the early 21st Century, evidence was discovered indicating that the eastern part of the house may date to 1677.

 

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