Ipswich farms and produce

Captain John Smith wrote the following when he explored the Massachusetts coastline in 1614:

“Here are many rising hills, and on their tops and descents are many corne fields and delightful groves…  planted with gardens and corn fields, and so well inhabited with a goodly, strong and well-proportioned people, besides the greatness of the timber growing on them, the greatness of the fish and moderate temper of the air …who can but approve this a most excellent place, both for health and fertility? And of all of the four parts of the world that I have yet seen not inhabited, could I have but means to transport a colony, I would rather live here than anywhere.”

Ipswich Agricultural Commission

Established in 2005, the mission of the Ipswich Agricultural Commission is to support and provide a voice for the significant agricultural community and resources of Ipswich. Visit the Ipswich Agricultural Commission page on the Town of Ipswich site.

Ipswich MA agricultural land

Captain John Smith wrote the following when he explored the Massachusetts coastline in 1614:

“Here are many rising hills, and on their tops and descents are many corne fields and delightful groves…  planted with gardens and corn fields, and so well inhabited with a goodly, strong and well-proportioned people, besides the greatness of the timber growing on them, the greatness of the fish and moderate temper of the air …who can but approve this a most excellent place, both for health and fertility? And of all of the four parts of the world that I have yet seen not inhabited, could I have but means to transport a colony, I would rather live here than anywhere.”

Ipswich Agricultural Commission

Established in 2005, the mission of the Ipswich Agricultural Commission is to support and provide a voice for the significant agricultural community and resources of Ipswich. Visit the Ipswich Agricultural Commission page on the Town of Ipswich site.

Captain John Smith wrote the following when he explored the Massachusetts coastline in 1614:

“Here are many rising hills, and on their tops and descents are many corne fields and delightful groves…  planted with gardens and corn fields, and so well inhabited with a goodly, strong and well-proportioned people, besides the greatness of the timber growing on them, the greatness of the fish and moderate temper of the air …who can but approve this a most excellent place, both for health and fertility? And of all of the four parts of the world that I have yet seen not inhabited, could I have but means to transport a colony, I would rather live here than anywhere.”