Featured: Owners of the Phillip Call house on High Street were the first to establish a preservation agreement with the Town of Ipswich.

Since 1969 the Ipswich Historical Commission has been responsible for a voluntary program of binding Preservation Agreements between the Commission and homeowners to preserve the structure’s architecturally significant features. Under the voluntary Agreement’s provisions, the homeowner agrees not to permit any alterations to the designated interior or exterior features of his home agreed upon in the “covenant.” The contracts are between the town of Ipswich, owners and future owners until the year 2100. Current owners of historical properties may contact the Ipswich Historical commission at historicipswich@gmail.com about creating such an agreement.

Something To Preserve was published by the Ipswich Historical Commission in 1975 and is a report on historic preservation by the acquisition of protective agreements on buildings in Ipswich, Massachusetts. This important book described the process by which the town of Ipswich began to preserve at-risk historic homes after the town rejected efforts to set up a legal historic district.

Preservation restrictions are drawn up in accordance with MGL Chapter 184, Sections 31-33. Ipswich has the largest preservation restriction program in the Commonwealth with 36 properties protected in this fashion, primarily First Period buildings.

The following houses have covenants (preservation agreements) with the Ipswich Historical Commission

Preservation agreements in Ipswich with other organizations

  • Appleton Farms (Trustees of Reservations) The oldest continually operating farm in North America.
  • Isaac Goodale House, 153 Argilla Rd. (1668)
  • Emerson – Howard House, 41 Turkey Shore Road (1640) (SPNEA Historic New England)
  • Paine House and Greenwood Farm, Jeffreys Neck Road, (Trustees of Reservations)
  • The Proctor Estate, County Road (Ipswich Great Estates Bylaw) The mansion and outbuildings were built in 1908 for the Proctor family where they lived until the 1940′s. Now owned by New England Biolabs and is protected under the Great Estates Bylaw
  • Charles Searle Estate, Jeffreys Neck Road (Ipswich Great Estates Bylaw) now owned by the Sisters of Notre Dame. Although the house is abandoned and the
    exterior is in bad repair, it is subject to the Great Estates Bylaw
  • Turner Hill, Topsfield Road (Ipswich Great Estates Bylaw). Built by William G. Rantoul in 1900, it was the home, farm and lands of importer and industrialist Charles N. Rice. Now owned by Turner Hill Associates. Turner Hill is subject to the Great Estates Bylaw.
  • The Whipple House, 1 South Village Green (Ipswich Museum)

Pre-1975 preservation agreements from “Something to Preserve.”

31 County Street, Ascension Memorial Episcopal Church (1875) - Ascension Memorial Episcopal Church on County Street was designed by famed architect James Renwick Jr. (1818-1895) and is considered “American Gothic Revival” in style. Construction was begun in 1869 and completed in 1875. Among Renwick’s other accomplishments include the designs of St. Patrick’s Cathedral and St. Bartholomew’s Cathedral in New York City, and the administrative … Continue reading 31 County Street, Ascension Memorial Episcopal Church (1875)
3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803) - At 3 Summer Street is the Benjamin Kimball House, a 1720 two-story, end gable building with a center chimney. The core of this house, probably a 2 room cape, was moved to this location in 1803 and expanded at that time. The Benjamin Kimball house is late first period but has been altered with Georgian and Federal … Continue reading 3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803)
33 High Street, the Waldo-Caldwell house (1660) - The Waldo-Caldwell House at 33 High St. is listed by the Ipswich Historical Commission as having been built in 1660. Unlike many First Period homes that began as half-houses, 6he present house was built in full as a two-over-two-room, central chimney plan house, with massive summer beams, a huge fireplace, and heavy chamfered frame, a very … Continue reading 33 High Street, the Waldo-Caldwell house (1660)
58 North Main Street, the Captain Richard Rogers House (1728) - The Capt. Richard Rogers House at 58 North Main Street in Ipswich is significant because of its fine Georgian style.  Richard Rogers descended from  Nathaniel Rogers who lived on the South Green. The house was built in 1728 about the time of the Rogers’ Manse across High Street. The central hallway with a closed string-course balustrade and … Continue reading 58 North Main Street, the Captain Richard Rogers House (1728)
7 County Street, the Thomas Dennis House (1663) - The house at 7 County Street dates to two periods. Shoreborne Wilson, a cooper, built a house and a cooper’s shop on this site about 1660 (3:133). Thomas Dennis bought the property in 1663 (8:69) and added an adjoining parcel in 1671 (3:201). The rear ell of the present house dates from that period, with wide chamfers … Continue reading 7 County Street, the Thomas Dennis House (1663)
26 High Street, the Philip Call house (1659) - The Phillip Call House at 26 High St. in Ipswich is a 2 story timber-frame First Period house built by cordwainer Philip Call about 1659, enlarged around 1725. It was probably at first a one over one “half house” with the front door on the right side. The evolution of this property to its current twelve … Continue reading 26 High Street, the Philip Call house (1659)
104 High Street, the John Kimball house (1715) - The John Kimball house, 104 High St. was  built in 1715 and is one of three “John Kimball” houses along High Street, two said to have been built by the father, the third by the son. The house at 77 High St. was built by John Kimball Sr., who died in 1698.  The house at 110 High St. is … Continue reading 104 High Street, the John Kimball house (1715)
Wainwright-Treadwell house, East St., Ipswich MA 62 East Street, the Wainwright – Treadwell House (1727) - Thomas Treadwell arrived in New England in 1635 with his wife and infant son Thomas. Excerpts from his will read that in 1671 he bequeathed to the junior Thomas his property on “Treadwell’s Island” between Labor in Vain Creek and Fox Creek. To his son Nathaniel he gave half of his upland house, barn and … Continue reading 62 East Street, the Wainwright – Treadwell House (1727)
80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700) - The First Period Perkins-Hodgkins house is believed to have been built in 1700 on the foundation of the earier Jacob Perkins home. The house has been greatly expanded and modernized over the years, but the original asymetrical structure continues to anchor the corner with Jeffreys Neck Road. Notable are the cellar joists, which are laid sideways instead … Continue reading 80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700)
103 High Street, the Merchant – Choate house (1670) - The Merchant – Choate House at 103 High Street is one of the original “Covenant” houses. The building dates to approximately 1670, but the right half may contain timbers from a previous structure on this site which was built in 1639. That simple story and a half cottage is believed to have been built by … Continue reading 103 High Street, the Merchant – Choate house (1670)
6 Water Street, the Preston – Foster house (1690) - The Preston – Foster House at 6 water street is described in “Something to Preserve” as having a typical original first-period floor plan in the original front structure. In the right half are two massive quarter-round chamfered summer beams typical of the late seventeenth century. The very sharp-pitched roof and purlins add additional evidence of the … Continue reading 6 Water Street, the Preston – Foster house (1690)
1 Turkey Shore Road, the Burnham-Patch-Day house (1730) - The Burnham-Patch House at 1 Turkey Shore Road in Ipswich has one of the original covenants established with the Ipswich Historical Commission. It is believed to have been built in 1730 based on the early Georgian paneling, but in the book “Something to Preserve” it is described as “much more difficult to date than the Heard-Lakeman dwelling” … Continue reading 1 Turkey Shore Road, the Burnham-Patch-Day house (1730)
2 Turkey Shore, the Heard – Lakeman House (1776) - The Heard-Lakeman House at 2 Turkey Rd. in Ipswich, built in 1776, is one of the original 14 houses with Historical Committee covenants. The book “Something to Preserve” describes it as “a typical center-chimney dwelling of the mid-eighteenth century.” The interior contains fine raised-field paneling and a handsome Georgian stairway with turned balustrade. A very … Continue reading 2 Turkey Shore, the Heard – Lakeman House (1776)
88 County Road, the Col. Nathaniel Wade House (1727) - The Nathaniel Wade House at 88 County Road in Ipswich is one of the original 16 houses that have preservation agreements (“covenants”) with the Ipswich Historical Commission. The house was built in 1727 by Captain Thomas Wade. The Wade brothers, Jonathan and Thomas, owned nearly, if not all, the land in the area from Argilla … Continue reading 88 County Road, the Col. Nathaniel Wade House (1727)
168 Argilla Road, the Tilton-Smith house (c 1720) - The “Tilton-Smith House” at 168 Argilla Road in Ipswich was awarded the 1999 Mary P. Conley award. Built circa 1720 by Abraham Tilton Jr., a 1998 fire took away much of its original frame, but the owner totally rebuilt the home with attention to historical detail and authentic 18th century craftsmanship. He saved what was … Continue reading 168 Argilla Road, the Tilton-Smith house (c 1720)
Day-Dodge house, 57 North Main, Ipswich MA 57 North Main Street, the Day-Dodge House (1737) - The Ipswich Historical Commission presented the 2008 Mary P. Conley Preservation Award to Craig and Grace Hanson, owners of the Day-Dodge House. The unusual double house is at the corner of North Main and East Streets, with two entrances and asymmetrical bays. The side facing East Street and may be a reused barn or similar structure from around 1640-1660. Thomas … Continue reading 57 North Main Street, the Day-Dodge House (1737)

Other preservation agreements

30 South Main Street, the Old Town Hall (1833) - The Old Town Hall building at 30 Main Street in Ipswich is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the South Green National Historic District (9/17/1980). For 180 years the massive Greek Revival building has stood at the corner of Elm Street and South Main Street. The Unitarian Church built it … Continue reading 30 South Main Street, the Old Town Hall (1833)
52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Shatswell Planters Cottage (c 1646) - The Shatswell family is one of the earliest to arrive in Ipswich. A small building that was moved to the Collins-Lord property on Jeffreys Neck Road is believed to have been the original planters cottage of John Shatswell or his son Richard. It may have been built as early as 1646, in which case it would be … Continue reading 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Shatswell Planters Cottage (c 1646)
26 East Street, the John Staniford – Polly Dole house (1687-1720) - This salt box house has elements from 1687 but acquired its current form in 1720.  It has a large front living room with a low ceiling, wide board floors and a “walk-in” fireplace. The long “summer beam” in the middle of this room is suspended by a cable to the peak of the roof. The … Continue reading 26 East Street, the John Staniford – Polly Dole house (1687-1720)
38 North Main Street, the Old Post Office (1763) - The Old Post Office at 38 North Main Street was built in 1763 and is part of the historic Dr. John Manning property. Probably originally built as a barn or warehouse, it became the post office in 1790. This building also served as the shop of Daniel Rogers, a master gold and silversmith who later moved to … Continue reading 38 North Main Street, the Old Post Office (1763)
29 North Main Street, the Odd Fellows Building (1817) - The Odd Fellows Hall at 29 North Main Street in Ipswich was built in 1817 as a Probate Court and Registry. Thomas Franklin Waters recorded the history of this building in Volume II of Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony: “Nathaniel Lord,”Squire Lord” as he was familiarly known, came to the office of Register and served … Continue reading 29 North Main Street, the Odd Fellows Building (1817)
1 South Green, the Whipple House (1677) - The 1677 Whipple house is a National Historic Landmark owned by the Ipswich museum, and is one of the finest examples of “first period” American architecture (1625-1725). The oldest part of the house dates to 1677 when the military officer and entrepreneur Captain John Whipple constructed a townhouse near the center of Ipswich. Prior to the 20th Century, … Continue reading 1 South Green, the Whipple House (1677)
54 South Main St., the Heard House (Ipswich Museum, 1795) - The Heard house on South Main Street is a Federal-style structure built in 1795 by wealthy John Heard. Before the Revolutionary War he had invested in the rum factory on Turkey Shore Road along the river bank where they unloaded barrels of West Indies molasses, and he later helped start the Ipswich Mills. His son Augustine Heard … Continue reading 54 South Main St., the Heard House (Ipswich Museum, 1795)
391 Linebrook Road, Linebrook Parish Church (1848) - The Linebrook Parish was incorporated in 1746 by an act of the Massachusetts Legislature as a “parish,” a region served by a particular church and its pastor. The building was originally located nearby on Leslie Road in Rowley. It was dismantled and re-erected on the new site in 1828. The building was taken down and the … Continue reading 391 Linebrook Road, Linebrook Parish Church (1848)
52 Jeffreys Neck Rd. Ipswich Ross Tavern 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Ross Tavern – Lord Collins house (c 1690) - The Ross Tavern, also known as the Lord-Collins House, is now located at Strawberry Hill on the former Wendell Estate on Jeffreys Neck Road. The structure was built in about 1690 in downtown Ipswich. In 1735 it was moved to the south-east side of the Choate Bridge where it remained until 1940 when it was … Continue reading 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Ross Tavern – Lord Collins house (c 1690)
3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665) - Built in 1665, the John Kendrick House at 3 Hovey St. in Ipswich was the winner of the 2002 Mary P. Conley award. (Also spelled Kenrick, Kendricks). The architect for the renovation was OLSON LEWIS + Architects. This house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the Ipswich Historical Commission. Protected elements … Continue reading 3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665)
67 Turkey Shore Road, the Stephen Boardman house (1720) - The Stephen Boardman house at the corner of Turkey Shore and Labor in Vain Roads was built between 1720 and 1725. The late First Period home is a 2 story, end gable house, timber frame house with clapboard siding. The wide pine board floors in the house are original, and 4 restored fireplaces share a central chimney. … Continue reading 67 Turkey Shore Road, the Stephen Boardman house (1720)
7 South Village Green, the Col. John Baker House (1761) - The land on which this house sits was given to Nathaniel Rogers, the second minister in Ipswich. Daniel Rogers sold the Rogers homestead to John Baker in 1761 (110:94), and Baker built the present house. The house has much original material, including Georgian paneling. Col. John Baker took an active part in the leadership of … Continue reading 7 South Village Green, the Col. John Baker House (1761)
69 S. Main Street, the Samuel Dutch house (b 1733) - Samuel Dutchbought this land in 1723 and built this house by 1733. The main (front) portion of the house facing the street appears to have been modified and enlarged with a third floor and a hip roof during in the early 19th Century. The rear wing has a chamfered summer beam, suggesting that it was an older house … Continue reading 69 S. Main Street, the Samuel Dutch house (b 1733)
52 N. Main Street, the Treadwell – Hale house (1799) - The building has been used in the past as a general store and currently as a single family home. The Ipswich assessors site lists the construction date as 1759, but it is believed to have been built after the land was sold to Nathaniel Treadwell 3rd on Feb. 8, 1799. The Ipswich Historical Commission named this … Continue reading 52 N. Main Street, the Treadwell – Hale house (1799)
100 High Street, the Joseph Fowler house (1756) - The  plaque on the Joseph Fowler house at 100 High Street states that it was built in 1756, but that is not completely certain. Fowler was a carpenter and bought the lot in 1720. Records indicated that the house may have existed on this spot before Fowler obtained it, although at least one old timer long … Continue reading 100 High Street, the Joseph Fowler house (1756)
37 High Street, Lord – Baker House (1720) - A house stood on this lot before 1682, when Abraham Perkins sold the property to Robert Lord. The house at 37 High St. is believed to have been built by Robert Lord III in 1720. The property continued in the Lord family until 1775, when Samuel Baker, felt-maker and hatter, purchased it. He probably kept his … Continue reading 37 High Street, Lord – Baker House (1720)
16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840) - Description by Historic New England On March 29 of 1837, mariner Richard Lakeman purchased the empty plot of land on which the Lakeman-Johnson House now stands from John Newmarch. The house was built sometime between the land purchase in 1837 and the sale of the property in 1846 when Lakeman sold the land “with the … Continue reading 16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840)
18 East Street, the Dodge house (1725) - The Dodge House at 18 East St. was built in 1725 and is a 2nd Period 2 story house protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the town of Ipswich.  Protected elements include the front and side facades including the Beverly jog, Center brick chimney and original fabric of the four fireplaces, wide … Continue reading 18 East Street, the Dodge house (1725)
14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725) - The Baker-Newman house at 14 East St. was built in 1725 and is an early 2nd Period 2-story, end gable half house with a Beverly jog. John Baker was granted a section of the land extending down East Street to Spring Street, originally granted to Rev. Cobbet. His son John Baker Jr. sold eight acres with … Continue reading 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725)
Candlewood Rd. house, Ipswich MA 59 Candlewood Road, the Jeremiah Kinsman house (1752) - According to family tradition, Stephen Kinsman built the house  at 59 Candlewood Rd. in 1752. He bequeathed to his son Jeremiah “all my lands in Walker’s Swamp with the dwelling house and buildings thereon, recorded Dec.27, 1756,  by which time Jeremiah and his wife Sara Harris were living in it. Illustration from Candlewood, an Ancient … Continue reading 59 Candlewood Road, the Jeremiah Kinsman house (1752)
10 County Street, the Dennis – Dodge House (1740) - The 1740 Dennis-Dodge house was owned by Captain John Dennis, whose father Thomas Dennis was a renowned woodworker and owned a home across the street. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote about the history of this lot: Richard Hubbard owned a goodly two acre tract bounded by Stony St., as it was then called, County St. and East St. … Continue reading 10 County Street, the Dennis – Dodge House (1740)
13 High Street, the Joseph Willcomb house (1669) - The Joseph Willcomb House was built by John Edwards, a tailor, in 1669. It has a massive oak frame, central chimney and clapboards typical of other First Period houses on High Street. The dining room boasts a cavernous firebox and beehive oven. There is a rear ell and a Beverly jog. Some walls display the original … Continue reading 13 High Street, the Joseph Willcomb house (1669)
3 High Street, the John Gaines house (1725) - The John Gaines house at 3 High St. is a 1725 frame building remodeled in 1806 with McIntire-type Federal trim and detail found particularly in the two front first-floor rooms. The following text is from the book, “Something to Preserve” by the Ipswich Historical Commission: “The left hand first-floor front room has an outstanding Mcintire-type … Continue reading 3 High Street, the John Gaines house (1725)
1 High Street, the Nathaniel Rogers Old Manse (1727) - The following is taken from “A Walking Tour and Brief History of Early Ipswich Massachusetts” produced by the Ipswich Visitors Center, Marjorie Robie and William Varrell. The Olde Manse at 1 High St. is a 2 story, gambrel-roofed house with a wood frame and clapboards. The 5 bay front is symmetrical, and the house is … Continue reading 1 High Street, the Nathaniel Rogers Old Manse (1727)
Dr. John Manning house, North Main Street, Ipswich 36 North Main Street, the John Manning house (1769) - The John Manning House at 36 North Main Street was built in 1769 by Doctor John Manning. It has one of the first preservation agreements in Ipswich, created by the Ipswich Heritage Trust and now administered by the Ipswich Historical Commission. Manning was a pioneer in the development of a smallpox vaccine. When he drove … Continue reading 36 North Main Street, the John Manning house (1769)
The Benjamin Grant house, County Street in Ipswich MA 47 County Street, the Benjamin Grant house (1723) - The Benjamin Grant House at 47 County Street in Ipswich was built in 1735, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. It is 2 1/2 story end-gable house with a one room deep front section and a rear lean-to. The front of the house is slightly asymmetrical, suggesting that it might … Continue reading 47 County Street, the Benjamin Grant house (1723)
Matthew Perkins house, 8 East Street, built in 1709 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1710) - The Captain Matthew Perkins House at 8 East St. in Ipswich was the winner of the 1991 Mary Conley Award. The house dates to about 1710 and was formerly known as the Norton-Corbett House. The 1st period 2-story structure has a timber frame, clapboard siding, an elaborate pilastered chimney, a rear ell, post-medieval overhangs front … Continue reading 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1710)
2 North Main Street, the John Appleton house (1707) - The John Appleton House, 2 North Main Street: Colonel John Appleton (son of  Samuel Appleton, an immigrant) acquired the lot which is now the northwest corner of North Main St. and Central St.  in 1707 after commanding a regiment in the expedition against Port Royal. He and his father Samuel Appleton were leaders in the effort of the … Continue reading 2 North Main Street, the John Appleton house (1707)
Howard House, Turkey Shore Ipswich Ma 41 Turkey Shore Road, the Howard – Arthur Wesley Dow House (1680) - The Emerson-Howard house on Turkey Shore Road across from the intersection with Green Street was built in 1680 by William Howard on land that he purchased from Thomas Emerson. (Read The Ipswich Emersons. A.D. 1636-1900 : a genealogy of the descendants of Thomas Emerson of Ipswich, Mass., with some account of his English ancestry (1900) by Benjamin Kendall … Continue reading 41 Turkey Shore Road, the Howard – Arthur Wesley Dow House (1680)
36 South Main Street, the Hall – Haskell house (1820) - Just past the Choate Bridge on South Main Street The Ipswich Visitor Center is located in the Hall – Haskell House, sometimes called the “Little Red House.” Earlier structures stood at this site before mariner Charles Hall and his wife bought the property in 1819. In 1820 they built this house, where they lived upstairs and … Continue reading 36 South Main Street, the Hall – Haskell house (1820)
19 North Main Street, Thomas Manning house (1799) - This house was built by John Heard for his daughter in 1799. Dr. Thomas Manning and other members of his family lived in the house until 1858, when it became a parsonage. This house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the Ipswich Historical Commission. Protected elements include: Exterior front and side … Continue reading 19 North Main Street, Thomas Manning house (1799)