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The following list of dates and events in Ipswich history is from the Genealogy of the Willcomb family of New England (1655-1902); “Over Three Hundred & Fifty Years of Ipswich History,”compiled  for the 350th Anniversary Committee of the Town of Ipswich Massachusetts in 1984 by Elizabeth H. Newton, Alice Keenan and Mary P. Conley,  revised by Lee and William Nelson and reprinted in 2001; Felt’s History of Ipswich, Essex and Hamilton; and Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony by Thomas Franklin Waters.

  • 9000 BC. Paleo-Indian site along the banks of Bull Brook and the Egypt River at the end of Paradise Road. .
  • 1614. Captain John Smith of Virginia sailed near Ipswich, and found here twenty-seven fisheries and trading posts.
  • 1617. A plague kills most of the Indians at Agawam.
  • 1622Capt. John Mason obtains title to all land between the Naumkeag and Merrimack Rivers (Salem to Newburyport) as a principal partner in a stock company known as the Plymouth Council for New England.
  • 1628. William Jeffrey is living at Agawam.
  • 1629. Hugh Brown and others sent to defend the Agawam Indians.
  • 1630 John Winthrop’s ship Arbella begins voyage to America
  • 1630. Warrants sent to Agawam for those settled there to leave.
  • 1631. Sagamore of Agawam banished from every house for one year, on penalty of ten beaver skins.
  • 1633. A plantation ordered commenced at Agawam. Agawam settled by Mr. John Winthrop, Jr., and his companions.
  • 1634. Agawam is formally changed to Ipswich, August 5. About 100 settlers arrive at Ipswich.
    • Robert Lord arrived with the first settlers and was appointed Ipswich Town Clerk
    • Anne Dudley Bradstreet and her husband Simon Bradstreet lived in Ipswich from 1634 – 1648
  • 1635. High Street was laid out and officially accepted during this year.
  • 1636. A court was ordered to hold a session once in three months in Ipswich
  • 1637. Ipswich was supplied with a watch house.
  • 1638. Masconnomet sold Ipswich to Mr. John Winthrop, Jr. for £20.
  • 1639.  John Winthrop Jr. moved  to Connecticut and sold Samuel Symonds the Castle Hill grant and his land at “Argilla Farm.”
  • 1639. Town of Rowley set off from Ipswich and incorporated.
  • 1640Deeds ordered to be recorded on town book.
  • 1642. Robert Paine was chosen town treasurer.
  • 1643. A fulling mill was built on the Rowley River by John Pearson.
  • 1644 Masconnomet puts himself his subjects and possessions under the protection and government of Massachusetts and agrees to be instructed in the Christian religion.
  • 1645Topsfield was set off from Ipswich.
  • 1647. Second meeting house was built, with Theophilus Wilson in care
  • 1649. Smoking forbidden when on the street.
    • Ordered that whosoever hath any hay within three rods of their houses shall remove it within six days after notice on fine of 20s
    • Ipswich was allowed two-fifths of Plum Island.
  • 1651. The town established a Latin school.
  • 1653. The law against Sabbath-breaking is posted on the meeting house.
    • Rev. Nathaniel Ward died at Ipswich.
  • 1654. Dr. Giles Firman returned to England.
  • 1656. Rev. John Norton removed to Boston.
    • William Paine removed to Boston.
    • Thos. Cobbet is chosen pastor of First Church.
  • 1658. Masconnomet, sagamore of.Agawam, died.
  • 1659. Town bell is rung at 9 p.m. each day.
  • 1660It is ordered that no house henceforth erected shall have any right to the common lands of this town without express leave of the town.
  • 1664. The town voted to grant no more land
  • 1665. Plum and Hog Islands and Castle Neck divided between Commoners who do not exceed 6s 8d in their person.
  • 1668. Forty shillings reward was paid to the person who killed a wolf.
  • 1670.  Every cow is obliged to wear a bell.
  • 1671 . John Sparkes’ Inn  is first mentioned. He was succeeded by Mr. Rogers who had the Sign of the Black Horse.  Mr. Crompton followed Rogers.
  • 1672Laborers are forbidden to have intoxicating liquors
  • 1678Law obliging all persons to have some visible employment.
    • Seventy foxes killed this year.
  • 1680. There are three military companies in Ipswich.
  • 1681Single persons who are under no government are ordered to put themselves under the care of some head of a family.
  • 1682. Tobacco yards have become common.
  • 1683. Samuel Appleton II removes to Lynn, owns Saugus Iron Works
  • 1684. A house of correction built...
  • 1687. Ipswich resists unjust taxation
  • 1689. Popular uprising. Gov. Andros imprisoned.
  • 1692. Elizabeth Howe, of Linebrook is tried for witchcraft and executed.
  • 1693. Supreme Court try several accused cases of witchcraft.
  • 1696. Samuel Appleton died early this year.
    • Ipswich voted to purchase three field pieces.
  • I700. Population of Ipswich about 1500.
    • Repaired the “Great Bridge” over the river.
  • 1701. Third meeting house erected, perhaps near on the site of the soldiers monument.  It was banked up with stones and gravel from the old fort on the green.  The pulpit of this house was placed “near ye edge of ye great rock in ye meeting house about seventeen foot from ye wall.”
  • 1704. A town house erected on Meetinghouse Hill.
  • 1705.  School kept in the town house.
  • 1709. One hundred and forty men admitted as Commoners.
  • 1711. Colonel Francis Wainwright died just before guests arrived for his second marriage
  • 1717. Almshouse built, 40x16x6 feet.
  • 1718. Tea comes into use among the richer class.
  • 1720. Flour is baked and eaten occasionally by the rich.
  • 1722. Probate office kept in court house until 1815.
  • 1725. Elizabeth Atwoid hung for murdering her child.
  • 1726 There were three Indian families living at Wigwam Hill, the last recorded in town.
  • 1727. The valuation of Ipswich is second in the county, Salem being first
  • 1733. Potatoes began to be cultivated.
  • 1734. One hundredth anniversary of the incorporation of Ipswich.
  • 1735. Ipswich pays £400 a year for the support of its poor.
  • 1736. Diptheria epidemic.
  • 1744. War begun with France.
  • 1745. Louisburg taken by New England forces.
  • 1747. South Parish meetinghouse erected.
  • 1748. Many great snow storms during February.
  • 1749. Fourth meetinghouse erected on the common.
  • 1755. There are 62 slaves more than 16 years old.
  • 1757. Captain Jonathan Fellows has exclusive right to sand banks.
    • “Wolves have nearly disappeared.
  • 1758. Second Seige of Louisburg
  • 1762. First stage once a week between Ipswich and Boston.
  • 1763. The “Stamp Act” passed.
  • 1764. Town and County bridge built (Choate Bridge)
  • 1766. Colonel John Choate died March 10, at Ipswich.
  • 1767. A steeple was built on the town house.
  • 1770. Coffee began to be used.
  • 1771. A new jail built on the site of the old one.
  • 1775. James Foster appointed first postmaster.
  • 1776. Ipswich instructs her Representatives in favor of Independence, June 10
  • 1777. It is voted that the ministers take turns in opening town meetings with prayer
  • 1778. Ezra Ross, of West Ipswich, hung at Worcester, for murder.
  • 1780. Slavery abolished by State Constitution.
  • 1782. Marquis de Castellux visits Ipswich, November 13.
  • 1783. Great rejoicing at Ipswich over the news of peace with England.
    • Houses began to be papered.
  • 1784The almshouse is rebuilt.
  • 1786. Twenty-five men enlisted and aided to quell Shay’s rebellion.
  • 1788. Commoners give an absolute grant of land to the town.
  • 1789. General George Washington reviews 3d Essex Regiment at Ipswich
    • General Michael Farley died June 20, at Ipswich.
  • 1790. Deer have nearly disappeared.
  • 1793. Hamilton set off from Ipswich, and incorporated.
    • A hail storm destroys about 5000 panes of glass in Ipswich.
    • Psalms and hymns began to be wholly read in church.
  • 1795. A new town house erected, costing $7000.
  • 1797. The town records begin to compute money in dollars and cents.
  • 1800. Population of Ipswich, 3305
  • 1802. Cato Haskell kills Charles Lewis from Virginia with a scythe, October 12. 1802. Haskell is sentenced for manslaughter, to be branded on the forehead with M, and imprisoned a year.
  • 1804. Smoking on the streets forbidden. Penalty, $1.00.
  • 1806. Baptist society was formed in February.
  • 1808. Ipswich trade suffers much from the Embargo.
  • 1810. Population of Ipswich, 3569.
  • 1811. Town gives $1000 to Newburyport fire sufferers.
  • 1813. Sixteen British prisoners committed to the Ipswich jail.
  • 1814. Betsey Telock, aged 49, is burned to death January 5. 1814. It has been commonly reported that she came to her end by spontaneous combustion from the inordinate use of ardent spirits, but it is the opinion of the gentleman who first discovered her body soon after the flames in her room were extinguished that she caught her bed clothes on fire with a candle and thus lost her life.
  • 1816. Major Joseph Swasey suddenly expired in the Town Hall, April 1.
  • 1817. The Probate Office building finished and occupied December 17.
  • 1818. The “Stars and Stripes” became the National flag.
  • 1819. Chebacco set off, and incorporated as Essex.
  • 1820. Canal finished between Ipswich and Essex.
    • Population of Ipswich, 2550.
  • 1821. Fire engine bought for $450, and house built for it.
  • 1823. The Baptist society was dissolved that year.
  • 1824. Boston & Ipswich lace factory established.
  • 1825. Over $200 raised to help build Bunker hill Monument.
  • 1826. Col. Nathaniel Wade, a personal friend of Washington, died Oct. 26.
    • The Methodist Sunday School was formed that year.
  • 1827. Voted 10 cents for every crow killed in Ipswich.
    • Ipswich Journal (weekly) first published.
  • 1828. Ipswich Female Seminary opened by Miss Grant.
  • 1830. The cotton factory began operations.
  • 1831. There are 332 dwelling houses and 298 barns in Ipswich.
  • 1832. Bridge finished over the river on Mill Rd.
  • 1833. There are three tanneries.
  • 1834. Rev. John P. Tyler assumes pastorate of Linebrook Church.
  • 1837. Population of Ipswich is 2858.
  • 1838. Old South meetinghouse dedicated January 1.
  • 1839. A train from Boston made its first passage through Ipswich.
  • 1841. Asahel Wildes is collector of the port of Ipswich.
    • Plum Island river was frozen over the winter was so severe.
  • 1842. House of Correction enlarged and built of brick.
    • A County Hospital for the chronic insane is built.
  • 1843. The Unitarian Church bought by the town for a town house.
  • 1844. John P. Cowles assumes charge of Ipswich.Academy.
  • 1846. A section of the town was added to Boxford.
    • Alfred Kimball is elected town clerk.
  • 1847. Seventeen lives lost by wreck of brig “Falconer.” Castle Neck. Dec. 19.
    • President Polk and Secretary Buchanan make addresses in Ipswich.
  • 1848. The church at Linebrook was torn down and rebuilt. Rev. E. Burchard assumes pastorate.
  • 1849. Capt. Joseph W. Willcomb and James H. Staniford leave Ipswich for California gold mines.
  • 1850. Ipswich Clarion (weekly) first published
  • 1852. The County Court Records are removed to Salem.
  • 1854.  Dr. Thomas Manning leaves his estate to build a high school.
    • Abraham Hammatt, antiquarian, died August 9, aged 73.
  • 1855. Daniel L. Willcomb is surveyor of the port of Ipswich. Frederick Willcomb is inspector of the port of Ipswich.
    • The County Court House was sold to the Methodist society.
  • 1856. Stephen Coburn is postmaster of Ipswich.
  • 1860. The population of the town is 3,300.
  • 1861. Benjamin Ellsworth is appointed keeper of the Ipswich Lighthouse
  • 1863. Coins gone out of circulation, postage stamps used for change.
    • Augustine Heard and nephews give $10,000 for the relief of soldiers.
    • Ipswich has paid $13,200 bounty to volunteers for the Union.
    • One hundred and fourteen families of volunteers receive town aid.
    • The town paid $9768.00 for aid to volunteers’ families.
  • 1864.  In the war of the Rebellion, Ipswich has sent 348 men.
    • Ipswich pays twenty men $2,500 to enlist.
    • The town has paid $12,092 for aid to volunteers’ families.
  • 1865. The population of Ipswich is 3,311.
    • News of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln causes great sorrow.
    • End of the Rebellion, and return home of the soldiers. The number of men of Ipswich who died during the war was 52.
    • The town has paid $15,950 in bounties to soldiers.
    • The town has expended over $52,000 to aid in suppressing Rebellion.
    • John H. Varrell is the postmaster of Ipswich.
    • John P. Cowles is principal of the Ipswich Female Academy.
    • The Ipswich Fruit Growers’ Society was organized September 22.
  • 1866. Abrani D. Wait is overseer of House of Correction. Dr. Y. G. Hurd is master of the House of Correction.
    • An organ costing $2000 is put in the Methodist Church.
  • 1868. The “Ipswich Bulletin” was published.
    • Decoration or Memorial Day was first observed May 30
    • Th« schooner “Lucy K. Cogswell” was built by Edward W. Choate.
    • The Free Public Library opened. Miss L. Caldwell, librarian.
    • Josiah Lord is Representative to the Legislature.
  • 1869.  The Church of the Ascension. Episcopal, was built on County street
    • Savings bank incorporated by J. Ross, F. Willcomb and others.
  • 1870.  The population is 3674.
    • Philip E. Clarke is inspector of customs.
  • 1871. The soldiers’ monument was erected costing $3,000.
    • The Ipswich Advance was published.
  • 1872. Ipswich Chronicle (weekly) first published.
  • 1873. The Methodist Society builds a parsonage which costs $6000,
    • A great Methodist revival occurs.
    • Ipswich Hosiery Mills employ about 300 operatives.
    • Ipswich Woolen Mills employ about 50 operatives.
    • The house of correction has 144 inmates. The insane asylum has 64 inmates.
    • An earthquake shock was felt at Ipswich Nov. 24.
    • There are 508 pupils enrolled in the public schools of the town.
  • 1875. Population of Ipswich is 3.674.
  • 1876. The Town Hall was rebuilt and enlarged.
  • 1877. Ipswich Gas Light Co. formed, works built, and pipes laid.
    • The post office is broken into and money and stamps stolen.,Nov. 27.
  • 1878. The schooner ‘”Helen M. Dennis ” was built.
    • The steamer “Carlotta” was built.
    • The postoffice was broken into the night of of April 5.
    • A sand schooner was destroyed on Ipswich bar in a storm April 23.
    • Post office broken into, safe and contents carried out, April 7.
    • Schooner Lucy K. Cogswell had her masts split by lightning. Aug.
    • Schooner “Hop Vine'” went ashore on Ipswich bar, Sept 6.
    • Schooner “Sarah Ann”” went ashore on Ipswich bar, November 2.
  • 1879. The Ipswich Mutual Benefit Association was organized
    • The sum of $3715 was raised Mar. 2 to pay debt of M. E. Church.
    • Fire destroys shops and barns at Damon’s mills, April 26, loss $18,000
    • The Willowdale Mills Company were incorporated.
    • Schooner “G. F. Higgins”‘ was driven ashore on the point, August 20.
    • Reservoir for fire purposes rebuilt at corner Mineral and High streets
  • 1880. The population of Ipswich is 3699
    • Mr. and Mrs. Huntington and four children drowned in Plum Island river
  • 1881. The ”Yellow Day” occurs this year. Schools closed in afternoon.
    • Schooner “Alice Oakes” was wrecked on Ipswich bar, June 10.
    • Schooner “Lucy K. Cogswell” sunk by collision with Stmr. Wm. Crane
    • Fire causes a loss of $6000 at the Willowdale mills.
  • 1882. A town well is drilled in Central square, 125 feet deep.
    • Steam yacht “Evangeline” foundered in Ipswich Bay, October 5.
    • 200th anniversary of death of Maj. Gen. D. Denison observed Sept. 20.
    • Manning street was built from High to Central.
    • Steamship “City Point”‘ wrecked on Plum Island and is a total loss
    • Reservoir built for fire purposes in Willcomb’s square.
    • First class postage reduced from three to two cents.
    • Unsuccessful attempt to blow open postoffice safe, by burglars, Nov.29
  • 1884.  Two hundred fiftieth anniversary of incorporation of town celebrated
    • Willowdale mills were destroyed by fire, Jan. 11, loss $50,000.
    • An earthquake is felt at Ipswich.
  • 1885.  Schooner “Isabella Thompson” wrecked on Castle Neck Dec. 1.
    • Schooner “Beta” wrecked on Plum Island, April 7, and three drowned.
    • Schooner “Lizzie” of Machias, Me., wrecked on Ipswich bar.
    • Schooner “Mark Gray” seriously damaged by collision.
    • Schooner “Franklin” wrecked on Plum Island, Nov. 13.
  • 1857. Schooner “E. M. Branscome” wrecked in Ipswich Bay.
    • Ipswich Insane Asylum is abolished October.
    • $2500 expended by the government in dredging Ipswich river.
    • Plum Island river is frozen over the winter is so severe..
  • 1889Agawam “Manual and Directory” published this year.
    • A schooner loaded with sand for Boston sank in Ipswich river.
  • 1890. A new life saving station is placed on Plum Island.
  • 1891. Ipswich Board of Trade instituted for the benefit of the town
    • Ipswich gas works were burned Jan. 17.
    • The Australian ballot system was first used at the town meeting.
    • The valuation of Ipswich is estimated at $2,435,239.
  • 1892. The Sand schooner W. H. Y. Hackett went ashore on Little Neck, in Feb.
    • The Ipswich National Bank was incorporated and began business.
    • The Baptist Church was instituted this year.
    • Warren Hardy killed by being run over by the ‘”Warren”‘ fire engine.
    • Number of children enrolled in the public schools is 736
    • The rate of taxation is S11.70.
    • There are 802 dwelling houses in town.
    • The number of domestic animals owned in the town is 11,209.
    • There are 1,017 voters registered in Ipswich.
    • The schooner Jonathan Cone went ashore on the beach, Nov. 21.
  • 1893. There are seven churches, twelve school houses, two banks in Ipswich.
    • The Free Public Library has about 12,000 volumes.
    • The schooner Celia went ashore on Ipswich bar April 18.
    • The Ipswich Mills employ about 800 operatives.
    • Schooner A. Baker, went ashore on Ipswich bar, Dec. 15.
    • The town is practically out of debt.
    • There are 61 stores and markets in the town
    • Average number of inmates and attendants at the County House, 150.
    • The population of Ipswich is about 4,500.
  • 1894. Schooner E. F. Willard, of Portland, wrecked on the beach, Feb. 5.
  • 1895.  Ipswich produced 47,700 bushels of clams for market this year.
    • Nine students graduated from the High School in June.
  • 1896. The first electric cars to Ipswich from Beverly were run June 22.
  • 1897. The telephone exchange was instituted at Ipswich.
    • The town put up 1,146 tramps this year.
    • Only five students graduated from the High School in June.
  • 1898. There was an eclipse of the moon. Jan 17.
    • A great snow storm occurred Feb. 1
    • The Ipswich Historical Society purchases the Whipple house.
    • Eclipse of sun, Dec. 13, ends cycle of eclipses begun 1260 years ago
  • 1899. Tremendous snow storm Feb. 13- 14.
    • Rev. T. Frank Waters is pastor of the South Cong. Church.
    • There are now 1000 dwelling houses in Ipswich.
    • Ipswich sends volunteers to the Spanish-American war.
  • 1900.  There are 1774 persons assessed in Ipswich.
    • The valuation of Ipswich is now $3, 245, 335. 37.
    • There were 179 arrests made during the year.
    • 825 pupils are enrolled in the public schools.
    • During the year 44 seals were killed in Ipswich.
    • There were only 28 cases of infectious and contagious diseases.
  • 1901. The number of assessed persons is 1807.
    • George Schofield, a Selectman and a Democrat, is elected to the Massachusetts General Court from a largely Republican District and serves several terms in the House and Senate.
  • 1902.  Benjamin Ellsworth, lighthouse keeper, died Feb. 21, aged 89.
  • 1903. The Electric Light System is built as a municipal utility by the Town under the leadership of George Schofield.
  • 1907. Greek settlers build their church, St. Mary’s of the Assumption.
  • 1908. Polish settlers build Sacred Heart Church. Their priest is Rev. Charles Ryc. Jewish residents establish a synagogue.
  • 1909. Ipswich artists win international fame. Arthur Wesley Dow, Theodore Wendel, Henry Kenyon, Francis Richardson.
  • 1910. – French residents found St. Stanislaus Parish, and begin their church in 1912. Their priest is Fr. Stanislaus Vermette.
  • 1913. Labor troubles erupt at Ipswich Hosiery Mills with a strike and violence as the workers demand higher wages. One woman is killed and out-of-town police have to be called in.
    • Walter Hayward organizes the Ipswich Cooperative Bank.
  • 1914. Sympathetic organizations send help to Britain, Belgium and France as World War I begins with the German invasions.
  • 1916. —Cable Memorial Hospital is built and equipped by Richard T. Crane, Jr., and given to the Trustees for the Town.
  • 1917. As the United States goes to war, many Ipswich men begin service in the armed forces. About 200 serve through the war.
  • 1918. A severe influenza epidemic strikes the Town with so many people ill that they are cared for in tents on the hospital grounds. There are many deaths.
    • Ipswich celebrates the end of the war, and the service men return home.
    • Col. F. R. Appleton, Jr., is one of the founders of the American Legion in Paris. The American Legion is organized in Ipswich.
  • 1920. Period of postwar unemployment causes much hardship among families, who are compelled to seek help from the Out Poor Department.
  • 1921. —Memorial Building is voted to be built in memory of Ipswich Veterans of all wars at a cost of $52,000.
  • 1922. —Hayward’s Stocking Manufacturing Plant is organized by Walter Hayward and his friend, Perley Barbour, and the building is constructed on land that was purchased from the Boston and Maine Railroad.
  • 1923. Rotary Club is formed with twenty members, soon increased to twenty-eight. Walter Hayward is the first President.
  • 1928. The closing of the Ipswich Hosiery Mills, caused by the failure of the owners, the Lawrence family to modernize, leaves several hundred people unemployed.
    • The Great Depression brings desperately hard times to the people of  Ipswich. Many families are able to survive only because of the help of the Town’s Welfare Department and of the federal agencies like the ERA, CWA, PWA and WPA, most of which are supervised by Selectman Brainard Wallace.
  • 1934. The 300th anniversary of the incorporation of Ipswich is celebrated. The First Church of Christ, Scientist, on North Main street is dedicated.
  • 1936. The Ipswich High School is completed with the help of  federal funds on Green Street at the site of the old jail, at a cost of $229,000. The opening is celebrated with a gala reunion of all the classes of Manning High.1937. An expedition starts from Ipswich to celebrate the 250th Anniversary of Manasseh Cutler’s expedition to Marietta, Ohio, in the Northwest Territory. Ipswich’s belief in freedom of the individual is believed to be an important contribution to the development of non-slave governments in that Territory.
  • 1938. Robinson’s Shipyard on Fox Creek is set up to build yachts and sailing ships. When war comes, the company converts to building a variety of vessels for the Navy. The Great Hurricane causes much damage and the destruction of hundreds of ancient elm trees.
  • 1941. After President Roosevelt and Congress declare war on Germany and Japan, hundreds of men and women begin to join all the armed forces.  Sylvania converts to super-secret war work for the Navy. 1,200 people are employed there building a device which was revealed to be the proximity fuse which had an important role in achieving victory.  Townspeople participate in Civil Defense work. airplane spotting, air-raid drills, and War Bond drives.
  • 1945. –In May World War II in Europe comes to an end with the defeat of Hitler’s armed forces; and in August, with the news of the surrender of Japan, an impromptu parade downtown to the honor roll celebrates the victory, but remembers with prayer the 30 men and one woman who gave their lives. (Shortly thereafter, the VFW, the Amvets and the PLAV join the American Legion in representing the veterans of Ipswich.)
  • 1948. Movement for Charter government begins, with John F. Conley as the chief proponent of more effective and economical town government.
  • 1950. Selectmen-Town Manager Charter is approved by the voters to go into effect March 1951. Joseph Coupal is appointed first Town Manager.
    • The total assessed valuation of the Town is $9,119,855.
    • As the Korean War begins, several Ipswich young men join the armed forces.
    • The townspeople join with the Trustees of Reservations to fight a possible state take-over of Crane’s Beach.
  • 1951. Ancient Indian artifacts are discovered at Bull Brook, initiating intensive studies of prehistoric Indian cultures.
  • 1952. Dispute in ownership of Crane’s Beach is resolved by negotiation between the Trustees of Reservations and the Selectmen, and by final approval of Town Meeting. The League of Women Voters of Ipswich is organized.
  • 1954. Town Manager Charter is narrowly defeated in March. A new Executive-Secretary Charter is approved by the voters in November to go into effect in March. 1955. Norris Stilphen is appointed Executive-Secretary.  Two damaging hurricanes. Carol and Edna. strike the Town.
  • 1955. —- Town’s Sewerage Committee issues a report recommending a sewer system to be built in three stages for the Town. The State’s Public Health Department urges the Town to end the pollution of the Ipswich River.
    • A polio epidemic makes parents fearful for children’s safety. A new Winthrop Elementary School is voted to be constructed to replace the old Winthrop on Central Street.
    • Supporters of improved school housing try many times to provide a 61 new High School to get secondary students off double sessions, but do not succeed in achieving the necessary two-thirds vote in many balloting efforts.
    • Several Greek Americans have developed large commercial enterprises for the processing and distribution of Ipswich clams.
  • 1956. – P.C. 1 186 anti submarine vessel is named after Ipswich.
    • The first housing for the elderly is contracted for by the Ipswich  Housing Authority.
    • Ipswich people strongly oppose the proposal of Essex County Electric Company to install power lines across the countryside to Essex and Gloucester.
    • Town Meeting approves Bamford’s $50,000 by-law, requiring a referendum vote, rather than a Town Meeting vote, on any capital improvement exceeding that amount, except for a town utility.
    • The first members of the Town’s three ethnic populations are elected to the Board of Selectmen. John Pechilis, a Greek-American, in 1956; Walter Dziadul, a Polish-American, in 1957; and John Trudel, a French-American, in 1958.
  • 1957. Conservation Commission is appointed after state legislation sponsored by Representative John Dolan is approved by the General Court.
    • First Zoning By-lave is approved by the voters to control the kind of haphazard growth that is threatening the Town.
    • Construction of Stage I of the Sewerage System is approved by the voters with the 5600,000 bond issue to be borne by the Town, and $143,000 granted by the Federal Government.
  • 1958. The Navy’s highest civilian award is given to J. Warren Horton, a native of Ipswich, for his work on the development of sonar.
    • Construction of the sewer system is begun, with the trunk lines and treatment plant being completed first and then with the municipal buildings being tied in.
    • With the help of matching funds from the State, odoriferous Farley Brook is enclosed through the downtown parking area.
  • 1960. John Updike, a resident of Ipswich, is honored by the National Institute of Arts and Letters for his first novel, “Poorhouse Fair”.
    • Among the Ipswich people who are listed in the 1960 edition of Who’s Who in America are.  Dr. Charles Sidney Burwell, Robert Gray Dodge, Harold Eugene Dow, Ben Perley Poore Moseley, Sidney Nichols Shurcliff.
  • 1961. Town Meeting votes to amend the Bamford By-law so that a vote on a school costing less than $500,000 can be taken at Town Meeting. In April the Town Meeting votes $495,000 to build an intermediate school on the High Street site.
  • 1962. In January the Town Meeting votes $495,000 additional funds to make the intermediate school into a High School.  Amid much controversy, Campanelli Builders, Inc., starts a large residential development in the Linebrook area, later to be known as Pinefield. Citizens for Better Government petition for revocation of the Executive-Secretary Charter, and in the referendum vote, they succeed by 29 votes.
  • 1963.    Town returns to the modified old selectmen form of government from 1963 to 1967. Town receives a $193,000 matching grant from the Federal Government for improvements to the water system.
  • 1964.    Selectmen, as Electric Light Commissioners, make the decision to purchase some electric power from the Massachusetts Electric system while continuing to operate the municipal generating plant. An elementary school is built in the Linebrook area, and is later named “Doyon” for a young man from the area who was killed in the Vietnam War. The Historical Commission is established by vote of Town Meeting.
  • 1965.   100% revaluation of the property in Town is completed, and the assessed value of property, both real and personal, is $53,533,000. Long-time Selectmen Nathaniel Quint and John F. Conley resign from office because of the new Conflict of Interest Law. Some Ipswich people  go south to participate in the demonstrations of the Civil Rights movement; most Ipswich people support the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1965.  Old North Church on Meetinghouse Green is destroyed by fire after being struck by lightning. (A new modern church is begun on the same site some years later.) When the power blackout occurs in the whole Northeastern U.S., the lights in Ipswich stay on, thanks to our independent municipal power plant.
  • 1966. The new St. Joseph Church is begun at the intersection of Linebrook and Pineswamp roads, on the old Ellsworth farm. For the first time, the municipal employees are represented by the labor union in their negotiations for a contract with the Town.
  • 1967. A new Town Manager Charter, which was drawn up by the Government Study Committee, is approved by the voters and goes into effect in March. John Stinson is appointed Town Manager.
  • 1968.    Citizens are deeply concerned at the escalation of the Vietnam War, and at the danger to Americans who are serving there in the armed forces, including many Ipswich men.
  • 1969. A zoning amendment for a Planned Community Development is approved by Town Meeting, but a specific proposal for a development by the Radice Corporation in the Linebrook area fails when the article for a sewer extension is defeated in a referendum vote. (Controversy continues for years until the State Department of Environmental Quality Engineering denies permission for the development’s on-site sewer system in 1976.)  The Town begins its efforts to find a solution to its water shortages, which are caused by the demand of its growing population. However, a proposal for the Kimball Brook Reservoir is indefinitely postponed at Town Meeting. The Hayes Hotel in Depot Square burns down causing four deaths.
  • 1970 .   Betty Cole is elected as Ipswich’s first woman Selectman.  Richard Conti is appointed Town Manager. The population of the Town grows from 8.544 in 1960 to 10.750 in 1970. Two important projects. a new high school and a new sewer treatment plant. are twice defeated on balloting days in spring and fall. Ipswich people, like people nationwide, find that their lives are affected more and more by national politics and events, and by the power and influence of television programming.
  • 1971. The first step of a controversial proposal for a nuclear power plant in Ipswich is defeated at Town Meeting. Advocates for Charter Government defeat the attempt of Concerned Citizens to revoke the Town Manager Charter.
  • 1972. Planning Advisory Committees are appointed to help develop a Master Plan. Their “Problems and Opportunities” report reveals that the townspeople want to retain the rural, historical environment of the Town.
  • 1973. Leonard Silvia is appointed Town Manager.
  • 1974. A new Electric Light Building on High Street near the Generating Plant is completed, and the Department moves to its new quarters from the building on Elm Street, which is turned over to the Town.
    • A Wetlands Amendment is approved by Town Meeting to become part of the Town’s Zoning By-law.
    • The Town approves the purchase of 12 acres of land to protect the Dow Brook Watershed.
  • 1975. The Historical Commission publishes “Something to Preserve”, a report on a Pilot Project demonstrating a method of protecting historic buildings by acquiring Preservation Agreements.
  • 1975. — 77 acres of Marini Farms are purchased by the Town to save agricultural land and to protect the Dow Watershed.
  • 1976. Joseph Mitchell is appointed Town Manager, but resigns after several months in office.
    • The Town is awarded a $100,000 HUD Community Development Block Grant for the beautification project on North Main Street and for the rehabilitation of homes in the central downtown area.
    • George Howe is appointed Town Manager
  • 1977. A second CDB Grant is approved by HUD to continue the work of rehabilitation for low-income families.
    • 80 low-income apartments for the elderly and 14 for families are constructed at Agawam Village off County Road by the Ipswich Housing Authority.
    • A comprehensive revision of the Zoning by-law is adopted by Town Meeting vote, to plan for more orderly growth and to comply with the State Zoning Enabling Act.
    • The South Parish House, operated as a Teen Drop-in Center by the Youth Commission, is tragically destroyed by fire.
    • Continuing water shortages plague the Town.
    • The new Sewer Treatment Plant becomes operational and functions very effectively, a source of pride to the Town.
  • 1978. Another year of water shortages forces methods of conservation on the citizens.
    • Essex Road Well is begun (and is completed in 1979).
    • Town dump is closed, and the site becomes a solid waste transfer station.
  • 1979. —- A tax cap set by the voting of Proposition 2 1/2 on the State level causes stringent economies in the Town budget.
    • Town Meeting votes that the Electric Light Department should not invest any further through Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company in the Seabrook nuclear plant.
    • The Conservation Commission publishes an Open Space/Recreation Plan.
    • A revaluation is performed to assess all property at 100% valuation. The new assessed value is $236,464,240.
  • 1980. George Howe is reappointed, the first second-term Town Manager.
    • Harold Bowen makes a bequest of his 1720 home to the Town of Ipswich.
    • Massachusetts Historical Commission announces that four districts in the historic areas of town are named to the National Register of Historic Places.
    • The proposal for a town-controlled Industrial Park on Mitchell Road is defeated.
    • Two devastating fires bring the terrible loss of life to three members of the Norris family and the destruction of Hill’s Store in Market Street.
    • A Community Development Block Grant of $300,000 is awarded for the improvement of the downtown shopping area.
    • Hill’s Store is rebuilt.
  • 1981. Downtown shopping area is greatly improved with the restoration of the Caldwell Block and the building of the Market Place which replaces the burned-out Damon Building.
  • 1983. Plan for Middle School. grades 6, 7, and 8. is inaugurated in the Whipple Junior High School, Green Street.
  • 1984. Town Meeting votes to build a new water treatment plant at a cost of $5,360.000.
    • Finance Committee announces that the Town is in excellent financial shape. The 1984-85 budget is $9.405,003. The 1983 valuation is $300,706,450. The FY 1984 tax rate is $19.25.
    • The Town Census shows our population to be 11,757.
    • The Town prepares for summer festivities to celebrate the 350th Anniversary of our incorporation as Ipswich.
    • One of the most permanent memorials will be the new monument erected by the veterans’ organizations at the honor roll site on South Main Street in memory of all Ipswich men and women who have served this nation in time of war.
  • 1985. Sharpshooters were hired by The Trustees of Reservations to cull Crane Reservation deer herd.
    • George Pappas and the Ipswich Shellfish Co. celebrated 50 years in business.
    • Strand Theater is closed and torn down.
    • First town planner hired.
  • 1986. Town meeting passes $1.5 million bond to build new addition to Winthrop School.
    • Green Street sewer project gets underway.
    • Alice Mosely became Ipswich’s first woman police officer.
  • 1987. Meadowview Farm Development approved.
    • New school policy requires equal opportunity for both sexes in hiring practices and educational programs.
    • First Presbyterian Church of Hamilton bought former Christmas Angel on County Rd. for a church.
    • Harvest Market on Central St. closes.
    • Town emergency declared as Ipswich River swelled beyond its banks.
    • Cable Hospital is converted into 70 apartments for the elderly and disabled citizens.
    • Boardwalk was built from parking lot to Crane Beach.
    • The town created a demolition delay bylaw.
  • 1988. Winthrop new school addition is opened.
    • Smoking was banned in Town Hall, Police and Fire Stations.
    • Anne Killeen and Anne Keraghan became our first women firefighters.
    • Appleton Farms celebrated 350 years of continuous operation by the Appleton Family.
    • Quint’s Corner, which opened in 1936, stopped serving lunch and ice cream at the lunch counter.
    • New water treatment plant.
  • 1989. Scientists and Nature experts predict that within a century the sea level near Ipswich would rise 3 to 11 feet and destroy 37-130 acres of Crane Beach.
    • Developer John Cormier purchased the historic 1640 Hart House with plans to turn it into a restaurant.
    • Quint’s closed.
    • Colburn Home for elderly is closed and will be sold.
    • Street number bylaw established.
  • 1990. The Population of Ipswich is 12,791.
    • The Merchants Association was formed.
    • Kommittee for Kids was started.
    • Mary Conley Preservation Award for Historic Home Preservation was established.
    •  Ipswich County Club was forced into bankruptcy.
  • 1991. Ipswich County Club was taken over by the Malden Bank for Savings.
    • Mime Crane donated Hog Island to The Trustees of Reservations along with a $3 million trust.
    • The Emergency Operating Center (EOC) was opened when Hurricane Bob paid a messy visit.
    • GTE-Sylvania puts its Ipswich plant up for sale.
    • Position of Finance Director established.
    • New sign bylaw was approved.
    • Choate Bridge Dedication Ceremony.
    • Composting facility opened.
    • Municipal government reorganization.
  • 1992. Harbormaster gets new boat.
    • School Committee entered school choice program.
    • Town-wide curbside recycling began.
    • Town building inspector enforced modern building code in historic homes.
    • Town historians announced they would start preservation of historical ancestry documents.
    • Town of Ipswich became home to two Chambers of Commerce when the Ipswich Business Association incorporated itself under the name of the Ipswich Community Chamber of Commerce.
    • First Saturday town meeting held.
  • 1993. St. Lawrence Literary Society decided to allow women to join their club.
    •  Strong fire chief law turned down by State Supreme Court.
    • Woolworth’s closes
    • Sally Dodge’s Farm, Greenwood Farm, was turned over to the Trustees of Reservations.
  • 1994. A 243-year-old house in Lords Square is demolished.
    • Communications tower at Cable Gardens was rejected by selectmen.
    • Bond was signed by selectman for addition to Doyon School.
    • Thousands of seeds, to feed 60 families, were planted at Cuvilly Farm on Turkey Shore Rd.
    • Ipswich Public Library marked its 125th anniversary.
    • 911 Emergency Response System activated.
    • 40 foot sperm whale washed up on Crane Beach.
    • Ipswich Co-Operative Bank purchases Depot Square Liquors building for a new bank.
  • 1995. Hills family store closed after 60 years.
    • Knowlton House 16-18 County Road was prevented from being torn down by The Historical Commission.
    • Cape Ann Market, in town since 1976, was bought by the Star Market.
    • Old Strand Furniture building in Depot Square was knocked down to make way for the Co-Operative Bank.
    • Town votes to join Essex County Mosquito Control Project.
    • EBSCO Publishing buys Sylvania property on Union St.
    • Ipswich Partnership hires a downtown manager.
    • Carleton Funeral Home sold to John Morris.
    • Three week celebration to observe the 50th anniversary of the end of WW II.
    • Lannan Chevrolet was sold to O’Keefe Chevrolet Oldsmobile Geo Inc.
    • Ipswich Partnership awarded $400,000 grant to revitalize downtown.
    • The movie “The Crucible” is filmed on Choate Island.
    • Long needed improvements were done to both Green Street bridge & Labor-in-Vane bridge.
    • Town took easements at Eagle Hill Landing by eminent domain.
    •  Construction of the fish ladder at the Sylvania Dam was started.
  • 1996. Town votes to build new $31 million middle/high school complex.
    • Town approves addition to 127-year-old library.
    • Woolworth building demolished.
    • Ben Franklin moves into Hills store.
    • Catholic Archdiocese of Boston announced plans to merge St. Stanislaus (French) and Sacred Heart Church (Polish) and St. Joseph’s Church.
    • La Salette is for sale.
  • 1997. Ipswich Partnership helps to upgrade downtown with grants to enhance streets and facades.
    • The new Catholic parish is named “Our Lady of Hope.”
    • St. Stanislaus is closed.
    • A new steeple with a cell tower within was put on the United Methodist Church.
    • YMCA gets new home at VFW Post 1093 property on County Rd.
    • Great Estates by-law is established.
    • 311 acre La Salette National Shrine to become conference center, luxury resort and golf course called Turner Mill.
  • 1998. School Committee declares the Whipple School surplus.
    • Plans are under way for a new golf course at Turner Hill.
    • Mass. Highway Dept. will take over construction of River Walk based on $417,000 federal and state aid grant to the town.
    • After 360 years, ownership of Appleton Farm will pass from the Appletons to the Trustees of Reservation.
    • Ipswich Women’s Club celebrates its 100th anniversary.
    • Train service was restored to Newburyport.
  • 1999. Ground breaking for new $3 million YMCA on VFW land.
    • The MBTA layover station for trains moves to Newburyport.
    • Green Street school is converted into the new Town Hall.
    • The 1699 Day house on Pineswamp Road was dismantled and reassembled in Topsfield.
    • Don Bosco is sold to New England Biolabs.
    • Sacred Heart Church closes.
  • 2000 . The population of Ipswich is 13,602.
    • A few hundred people gathered on New Year’s Eve morning to dedicate the new Ipswich Family YMCA.
    • Crane Beach parking stickers went from $3 to $4 and horse van stickers to $20.
    • High tides and strong easterly winds washed away about 30 feet of the board-walk at Crane Beach.
    • School officials discovered that two Arthur Wesley Dow paintings which they were given have been appraised at between $750,000 and $1,000,000.
    • A German company, Reifenhauser moved into the former Chronicle building at 2 Washington St.
    • The town received a check from the State for more than a $1,000,000 for the Ipswich Public Library project.
    • The Planning Board approved Omnipoint’s bid for a cell tower at Cable Gardens.
    • A $10,000,000 bond fund for open space was approved at town meeting. Ben Franklin store on Market Street closed.
    • The Essex County Greenbelt and the Friends of Nichols Field completed the purchase of the 15-acre meadow called Nichols Field.
    • New England alive closed by the State.
    • A 120-foot cell tower was approved on Turnpike Rd.
    • A 19-unit motel at the corner of High St. and Mitchell Rd. was approved.
    • A new “Birth to 3” center opened at the site of the former Ben Franklin.
    • Beer and wine license for the Richdale Store on Market St.
    • The Ipswich League of Women Voters voted to disband.
    • The old Knowlton house, which is condemned, was listed on the state’s most endangered historic resources.
    • Family Dollar Store opened at what was part of the Ben Franklin Store.
    • Redesign of Central St/Lord Square was completed.
    • Open Space Program Manager was hired.
    • Veteran football coach Jack Welch retired after 37 years at Ipswich High School.
    • The Brown’s cottage at Castle Hill was restored and opened as a B&B.
    • New Middle School / High School opened.

Early Settlers at Ipswich, Mass.

1628. William Jeffrey, John Smith.

1633. John Winthrop, Jr., Mr. William Clerk, Robert Coles, Thomas Howlet, John Diggs, Jolin Gage, Thomas Hardy, William Perkins, Mr. John Thorndike, William Sergeant, Thomas Sellan, George Carr, John Shatswell.

1634. Matthias Currin, John Dillingham, Elliot, Nicholas Easton, William Franklin, John Fuller, Mr. John Fawn, John Manning, John Newman, John Perkins, John Perkins, Jr., Mr. Thomas Parker, John Robinson, Mark Symonds, John Spencer, Mr. Henry Sewell, Mr. Nathaniel Ward.

1635. Robert Andrews, Mr. Thomas Bracey, Dudley Bradstreet, Humphrey Bradstreet, Mr. Simon Bradstreet, John Cross, Mr. John Cogswell John Covengton, Mr. Thomas Dudley, Mr. Samuel Dudley, Mr- Daniel Dennison, William Fuller, Philip Fowler, William Foster, Mr. Thomas Firman, Mr. Thomas French, William Goodhue, Ed- mund Gardner, George Giddinge, Mr. William Hubbard, John Hassell, Richard Haffield, John Jackson, John Johnson, Francis Jordan, Richard Jacob,.’\le.\ander Knight, Richard Kent, Robert Kinsman, Roger Lancton, William Moody, Joseph Metcalf, John Mussey, Robert Mussey, Christopher Osgood, John Proctor; Allen Perley, Mr. Richard Saltonstall, Anthony Short, Henry Short, William Symonds, Edmund Sayward, John.Saunders, Hugh Sherratt, Thomas Scott, John Tuttle, Mr. Treadwell, George Varnum, Paul Williamson, John Wyatt, Francis Wainwright, Thomas Wells, John Webster, William White, John Whityear, Mr. Jonathan Wade, Mr. Woodman, Mr. Humphrey Wythe, Samuel Younglove.

1636.  Thomas Bishop, Daniel Clark, Thomas Dorman, Samuel Hall, Nathaniel Hart, Thomas Harris, Richard Jennings, Robert Lord, Johr. Merriall, Mr. John Norton, Mr. William Norton, Francis Peabody, Mr Nathaniel Rogers, Samuel Sherman, John Seaverns, Edmund Sawyer, Theophilus Wilson.

1637. Samuel Appleton, William Avery, Henry Archer, Nathaniel Bixby, Thomas Browning, Thomas Boreman, Thomas Clark, Robert Cross, Phillip Challis,.Arthur Colebeye, Symond Comesone, Edward French, William Heildred, Robert Hayes, Daniel Hovey, Stephen Jordan, Richard Kemball, William Lamson, Daniel Ladd, Katherine Lord (widow), Joseph Mosse, John Northe, Mr. Pike, William Purrier, Isaac Perkins, Joseph Reading, Mark Quilter, Thomas Rawlinson, Mr. Samuel Symonds, Edward ‘J’readwell, Captain Turner, John Thornton, Mr. Humphrey Vincent, John Wedgewood, William Whitred, Michael Williamson, Willian Warren, Richard Wattles. Mr. John Whittingham, Nathaniel Bishop.

1638. Edward Brown, John Burnam, John Baker, John Cooley, Michael Cartwright, Henry Cachame, Robert Crane. Isaac Comings, Widow Dix, John Dane, Thomas Emerson, William English, Mr. Daniel Epps, Joseph Emerson. John Emerson, ‘I’homas French, Jr., Robert Graves, Thomas Gibson, Samuel Greenfield, John Hanchet, Henry Kingsbury, Mr. William Knight, Henry Kemball, Richard I^unikin, John Morse, Thomas Medcalf, William Miller, John Newmarch, Richard Nichols, William Paine, John Robinson, Thomas Silver, Thomas Sherman, Robert Scott, Lianon Stacy, William Swinder, John Tread’ well, Thomas Treadwell, Samuel Taylor, Matthew Whipple, Mr. John Whipple, Henry Wilkinson, Robert Whitman.

1639. John Andrews, Matthias Hutton, Thomas Bird. Jeremy Belcher. Mr. Richard Bellingham, Nathaniel Bosworth, Jathnell Bird, Samuel Boreman, Edward Cachame, Lionel Chute, Robert Castell, John Davis, Robert Filbrick, Dr. Giles Firman, Ralph Farnum, Thomas Gilven. Humphrey, Richard Huttley, George Hadley,.Andrew Hodges, John Knowlton, Robert Mohey, Thomas Newman. James Pitney, Roger Preston, Thomas Smith, Andrew Story, Simon Thomson, Palmer Tingley, Robert Wallis.

1640. Mr. Bacheller, John Lee, Robert Paine.

1641. Thomas Hart, John Hoyt, Thomas Safford.

1642. John Annable. William Adams. John Brown, Robert Beacham, Richard Bitgood, Henry Bachellor, Thomas Brewer, John Cowley. John Dane, Jr. Wm. Duglass, Richard Davis, Francis Dane, Robert Day, William Fellows, James Howe, William Knowlton, Thomr.s Knowl- ton, Aleph Knight, Thomas Lee, Edward Lumas, Richard L/mas, Thomas Perry, John Pettis, Moses Pingrey, Henry Finder Daniel Podd, John Reddin, Richard Scofield, Theophilus Ketchell, Richard Smith, Daniel Warner,

1643. Richard Andrews. William Buckley, Thomas Low, Thomas Windall.

1644. Edmund Bridges, Robert Chelson. Edward Chapman. Robert Rolserts,
Captain Daniel Wood.

1645. Mr. Thomas Whittingham.

1647. Thomas Burnam, John Dennison, Robert Hunter, Luke Heard, Thomas Lovell. Henry Silsbee.

1648. Wm. Averil, John Appleton, John Ayres, Hamel Bosworth, Edward Bragg, Richard Betts, Gyles Birdley, Job Bishop, James Chute, John Catchame, Malachi Clark, John Choate, William Cogswell, Robert Colborne, Robert Dutch, Ralph Dix, Abraham Foster. John French, William Gutterson, Lancelot Granger, Humphrey Gilbert, Thomas Green, William Heiphar, Anthony Harris, Thomas Harris Richard Kemball, Jr., Samuel I,ong, John La>ton, Jacob Perkins, John Pindar, Aaron Pingrey, Samuel Podd, Robert Pearpoynt, Mr. Bryan Pendleton, Daniel Ringe, Mr. Thomas Rawlinson, Ezra Roffe. Daniel Roffe, George Smith, William Story, Thomas Stacy, Nathaniel Stone, Thomas Scott, Jr., Richard Satchwell, Robert Smith, Theophilus Salter, John Woodman, Abraham Warren, Abraham Walderne. Dr. John Ward, John Whipple, Jr. Thomas Whitred, Edward Walderne, John West, John Wooddam, John Warner, Joseph Lanctoii, Philip Long.

1649. Joseph Bixby. William Pritchard, George Palmer, Anthony Potter, Obadiah Wood.

1651. Humphrey Griffen, Edward Gillman, Edward Harrindin, Joseph Leigh, Henry Walker.

Sources

  • Ipswich History 1634-1902 (from Genealogy of the Willcomb Family)
  • “Over Three Hundred & Fifty Years of Ipswich History,”compiled  for the 350th Anniversary Committee of the Town of Ipswich Massachusetts in 1984 by Elizabeth H. Newton, Alice Keenan and Mary P. Conley,  revised by Lee and William Nelson and reprinted in 2001.
  • Felt’s History of Ipswich, Essex and Hamilton
  • Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony by Thomas Franklin Waters