10 Washington St. 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770) - Captain John Lord house, 10 Washington St. The house was constructed before 1770 on N. Main St., and was moved to this location in 1860 by Michael Ready (Deed 607:206). The second floor was probably added at that time.  The Isaac Flitchner house at 45 North Main Street  sits on the former location of the  Captain John Lord … Continue reading 10 Washington St., the Mary Holmes – Captain John Lord house (b. 1770)
Josephy Manning house, South Main Street, Ipswich 31 South Main Street, the Joseph Manning house (1727) - In exploring the history of this building, I uncovered a tale of two families, one most fortunate, and the other less so. A house on the lot at 31 South Main Street can be traced back to Isaac Fitts, a hatter, who petitioned for forty feet on the River bank in 1726, that he might set … Continue reading 31 South Main Street, the Joseph Manning house (1727)
1 Highland Avenue, the Wainwright School (1890) - In 1926 when the Shatswell School was constructed on Green Street, several small schools were closed, including the Dennison School on Meeting House Green, the Cogswell School on Payne St., and the Wainwright school on Highland St near the intersection of Spring St. The History of the Ipswich Public Schools states that the Wainwright School was … Continue reading 1 Highland Avenue, the Wainwright School (1890)
Thomas Morley house, 48 North Main St., Ipswich MA 48 North Main Street, the Thomas Morley house (c 1750, alt. 1845)) - This house and its northern neighbor, 50 North Main, were a single structure before 1845, when Thomas Morley bought the southern portion of that house,  separated and rotated it 90° to present a gable end to the street, and finished it for his dwelling. Thomas Morley was an artist and taught painting in his school on … Continue reading 48 North Main Street, the Thomas Morley house (c 1750, alt. 1845))
William Warner house, 35 Mill Rd. Ipswich MA 35 Mill Road, the Captain William Warner house (1780) - The William Warner house was constructed in 1780. William Warner was the “clothier,” of Warner’s Mill at the triple stone arch bridge that connects Ipswich and Hamilton on Mill Rd. William Warner, 3*, Capt William as he was known in later life, succeeded his father in the fulling business, and his son Stephen purchased the property … Continue reading 35 Mill Road, the Captain William Warner house (1780)
33 East St., the Old Store (1830) - The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 and is known as the “Old Store.” It was built at the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby. Quimby was a native of Sandwich, New Hampshire. Ipswich Vital Records show that in 1849 at the age … Continue reading 33 East St., the Old Store (1830)
County Street, Ipswich MA 17 County Street, Daniels Shoe Factory (1843) - The house at 17 County Street is on the site where Major General Daniel Dennison built his home in the early 1600’s, but which burned after 25 years. The present house was originally built as a mill near the EBSCO dam in 1843. The building has two historic names, Hoyt’s Veneer Mill, and Perkins & … Continue reading 17 County Street, Daniels Shoe Factory (1843)
52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Shatswell Planters Cottage (c 1646) - The Shatswell family is one of the earliest to arrive in Ipswich. A small building that was moved to the Collins-Lord property on Jeffreys Neck Road is believed to have been the original planters cottage of John Shatswell or his son Richard. It may have been built as early as 1646, in which case it would be … Continue reading 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Shatswell Planters Cottage (c 1646)
Martin Keith house, Candlewood Rd. Ipswich 36 Candlewood Road, the Martin Keith house (1807, moved 1995) - The Martin Keith House (1807) is a fine Federal era specimen that stood for two centuries near Rock Village in Middleborough Massachusetts. The home was built by housewright Aaron Simmons Sherman of Marshfield, known for the impeccable Thomas Ruggles House (1818-20) at Columbia Falls, Maine, which bears a remarkable resemblance. The Keith house was damaged by a … Continue reading 36 Candlewood Road, the Martin Keith house (1807, moved 1995)
20 Market Street, the Stacey-Ross house (1734) - The Stacey-Ross house at 20 Market Street in Ipswich was built in 1734. The Stacey-Ross house is unique as a surviving early eighteenth-century building that was moved 100 years after its construction, and still survives in its “new” home on Market Street almost 175 years after its move. In 1733 John Stacey ” being incapable … Continue reading 20 Market Street, the Stacey-Ross house (1734)
Payne School, Lords Square 1 Lords Square, Payne School (1802) - The old Payne School sits at 1 Lords Square in Ipswich, between Linebrook Road and Liberty Street.  In 1802, the North District decided to construct a schoolhouse with public subscription. Dr. Manning gave half the funds for its construction. The building was one story, and was the beginning of the Payne School in Lord Square. Town Clerk Nathaniel … Continue reading 1 Lords Square, Payne School (1802)
4 Water Street, the Jewett house (1849) - Records of the Massachusetts Historical Commission list the modest Colonial Revival house at 4 Water Street as having been built circa 1880 by J.E. Jewett. There is considerable evidence suggesting that the 1880 date is incorrect and much too late. The frame of the oldest part of the house is typical of the “I-house form” … Continue reading 4 Water Street, the Jewett house (1849)
1 South Green, the Whipple House (1677) - The 1677 Whipple house is a National Historic Landmark owned by the Ipswich museum, and is one of the finest examples of “first period” American architecture (1625-1725). The oldest part of the house dates to 1677 when the military officer and entrepreneur Captain John Whipple constructed a townhouse near the center of Ipswich. Prior to the 20th Century, … Continue reading 1 South Green, the Whipple House (1677)
83 Central Street, the International House (1866) - The International Hotel In 1866 the International House was built by the Eastern Railroad at Depot Square in Ipswich approximately where the Institution for Savings bank now sits. The Eastern Railroad ran from Boston to Portland, continuing to Canada and was the primary competition of the Boston and Maine Railroad until it was acquired by … Continue reading 83 Central Street, the International House (1866)
John Wade house, County Rd. Ipswich 85 County Road, the John Wade house (1810) - The John Wade house was built at the far end of South Green in 1810, but was moved further down County Road in 1948 to the corner of Lanes End to make room for the South Green Burial Ground expansion.  The Wade family owned and built many of the houses along County Rd. in that … Continue reading 85 County Road, the John Wade house (1810)
12 Warren Street, the Albert P. Hills house (1700) - The small cottage at 12 Warren Street in Ipswich is listed on the town assessors site as having been built in 1700, but the Historical Commission does not provide a date. The front section is the oldest. Nathaniel Bishop was among the original settlers of Ipswich and was granted a 10-acre lot that extended from North … Continue reading 12 Warren Street, the Albert P. Hills house (1700)
8 Warren Street, the Harris – Grady house (1720? 1772-1887) - It is believed that this house may hae some first period construction elements dating to approximately 1720. Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that in 1887, William Russell removed a house built in 1772 by James Harris at 12 High Street and built his Victorian house. In “A Walking Tour of Ipswich” by Marge Robie and William Varrell … Continue reading 8 Warren Street, the Harris – Grady house (1720? 1772-1887)
5-7 Poplar Street, the Dr. John Calef house (1671) - The core of the house at 5-7 Poplar Street is an example of a First Period house with Georgian modifications. It was built between 1671 and 1688 by Deacon Thomas Knowlton who purchased the land on which it originally stood on South Main. It was subsequently altered in the middle of the 18th century, acquiring … Continue reading 5-7 Poplar Street, the Dr. John Calef house (1671)
Burnham-Brown house, 86 County Rd., Ipswich MA 86 County Road, the Burnham – Brown house (1775) - The Burnham – Nathan Brown house at 86 County Road is a 1775 Second Period Colonial. This house was built in 1775 on a lot on Candlewood Rd., probably by Thomas Burnham. In 1821 Nathan Brown bought the house from Oliver Appleton, and 3 years later he removed it to its present site on County Rd.  Brown … Continue reading 86 County Road, the Burnham – Brown house (1775)
3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803) - At 3 Summer Street is the Benjamin Kimball House, a 1720 two-story, end gable building with a center chimney. The core of this house, probably a 2 room cape, was moved to this location in 1803 and expanded at that time. The Benjamin Kimball house is late first period but has been altered with Georgian and Federal … Continue reading 3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803)
83 County Road, the Rogers and Brown House (1723) - The Rogers and Brown House (also known as the Nathaniel Rust House) at 83 County Road is believed to be three houses joined together, at least one and perhaps all three from the First Period. The house is described on the Massachusetts Historical Commission site MACRIS: “The Rust Mansion is a 2 1/2 story end-gable … Continue reading 83 County Road, the Rogers and Brown House (1723)

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