6 Jeffreys Neck Road, the Oliver L. Sanborn house (1855)

6 Jeffreys Neck Road, the Oliver L. Sanborn house (1855)

In 1716, after he became of age, Elisha Perkins and his mother sold Arthur Abbott, yeoman, a lot 4 rods square at the NE corner of the Perkins homestead abutting on land of his uncle Captain Matthew Perkins, and fronting on the road to Jeffrey’s Neck. (34, 16) Abbott built a house on the lot but sold the house and lot back to Elisha, who then sold the house with a half-acre of land bounded NW by Andrew Burley to Solomon Lakeman, fisherman, Aug 14, 1724 (44, 35)

Solomon Lakeman sold the house and land, to his brother Archelaus Lakeman, Jan. 20 1734 (69, 16) and his widow conveyed half the house and land to Solomon Lakeman Jr., June 4, 1747 (101, 236). He secured the other half and deeded the whole to Moses Wells Jr., mariner Feb 19, 1756 (101, 236). John Wells and others sold the homestead to Abner Harris, May 29, 1777 (142, 224) and his executor to Edward Martin June 9, 1785 (143, 187) who conveyed it to Mary Martin singlewoman, his sister, April 27, 1796 (163 37).

Mary Martin sold the land and “buildings thereon” to Lydia, wife of Deacon Francis Caldwell Jr., March 3, 1828 for $300.00 (255, 235) Mr. Caldwell had married Lydia Hovey in 1811.

The 1832 Ipswich map shows no house at this location, but shows the William Treadwell Farm with a house at about the location of the present entrance to Cuvilly Arts Center. Francis Treadwell lived in the old Treadwell estate and had two daughters, one of whom, Mary, married Oliver L. Sanborn.

1856 Ipswich map

The 1856 Ipswich map shows the homes of Francis Caldwell and William Treadwell. The Sanborn house would be just north of Caldwell. Francis Caldwell died in 1863 and is buried at the Old North Burying Ground in Ipswich.

Deacon Francis Caldwell sold a “certain piece of land on the road to Jeffreys Neck,” measuring 61 ft. on the road and 290 ft. deep for $150.00 to Oliver L. Sanborn, October 25, 1854. In Caldwell’s deed, there is no mention of buildings (520:198). It is assumed that Oliver Sanborn built this house in 1855, but it would be an unusual mid-19th century example of a “half-house” with a steep roof, usually associated with the 17th and 18th centuries. Perhaps an older house was moved to this location, and further investigation is warranted.

The heirs of Sanborn transferred the lot in 1889, for $900.00 “with the buildings thereon” to Frank G. Sanborn “being the same premises conveyed to Oliver Sanborn by Tyler Caldwell” (1254:189). The 1910 Ipswich map shows two houses side by side and outbuildings, owned by Frank Sanborn.

Oliver Sanborn house, from the MACRIS site, circa 1980

Sources:

 

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