A town of immigrants

Featured image: Immigrant workers at the Ipswich Hosiery Mill, by Ipswich photographer George Dexter. The earliest evidence of habitation in Ipswich was discovered in the 1950's at the Bull Brook Paleoindian site, where hundreds of stone instruments were recovered, made by early Native Americans who migrated here after the ice age glaciers receded. The Agawam Indians who greeted the first … Continue reading A town of immigrants

Ipswich Streets, Roads and Neighborhoods

The first roads in Ipswich followed ancient paths of the Native Americans who called this place "Agawam." The English settlers built their homes in a half-mile radius of the Meeting House. In the year 1639, the General Court instructed that "all highways shall be laid out beforeth the next General Court. Every town shall choose two or three men who … Continue reading Ipswich Streets, Roads and Neighborhoods

Historic people

Alice Keenan wrote, "When we moved to Ipswich, this lovely old town, its long history, ancient houses and interesting people became almost an obsession. Dry names and dates mean little to me until one firms out the flesh of the past, for it's those long-ago people without whom Ipswich and its history would be dull."

Ipswich Cornet band, Ipswich MA historic photos 1889

Photos from Ipswich

Many of these photos were digitally developed from original glass negatives taken by three early Ipswich photographers, Arthur Wesley Dow, George Dexter, and Edward L. Darling.

Little Neck, Ipswich MA

Little Neck, a photographic history

In 1639, two wealthy brothers William and Robert Paine (aka Payne) procured a grant of land in the town of Ipswich from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In about 1649 Robert offered to “erect an edifice for the purpose of a grammar school, provided the town or any particular inhabitant of the town would devote, set … Continue reading Little Neck, a photographic history

Pillow Lace Sign, High St., Ipswich MA

Pillow lace

The Pillow Lace plaque is located in front of 5 High Street in Ipswich. In the mid-18th Century a group of Ipswich women started making and selling lace with distinctive patterns. Small round lap pillows were used to pace the bobbins and needles as the lace grew around it. Ipswich lace quickly became very popular and … Continue reading Pillow lace

A photographic history of the Ipswich Mills Dam

Until 350 years ago, the Ipswich River ran unencumbered from its origin 35 miles upstream, carving its way through a 148-square-mile watershed. Herring, shad, salmon and alewife swam upstream to spawn. Thomas Franklin Waters noted that, "Great shoals of alewives came up the river in the Spring and were seined at night by the light of torches … Continue reading A photographic history of the Ipswich Mills Dam

The Ipswich Hosiery Industry

In the mid-18th Century a group of Ipswich women started making and selling lace with distinctive patterns. Small round lap pillows were used to pace the bobbins and needles as the lace grew around it. Ipswich lace quickly became very popular and played an important roll during the American Revolution. At the height of its … Continue reading The Ipswich Hosiery Industry