The Story Behind the Story of Wigwam Hill

Photo of Wigwam Hill, taken from Choate Island by George Dexter.

A 2020 article on this website by Gordon Harris describes the fascinating history of the Epes' Farm on Castle Neck, including how in 1669 an old Indian woman with her daughter and two grandchildren sought refuge there. The old account describes them as "a company of destitute Indians from the Lake Winnipesaukee region." They were… Continue reading The Story Behind the Story of Wigwam Hill

The Tragedy of the Wilderness: The Colonists and Indian Land, Part 4

by Mary Ellen Lepionka. Featured image: North Conway, 1907. The White Mountain National Forest was established in 1918. In New England townships, common lands became increasingly smaller with each subdivision through distribution, sale, or inheritance. As commons shrank, conflicts over herding grew. The number and sizes of herds had to be regulated, as some settlers… Continue reading The Tragedy of the Wilderness: The Colonists and Indian Land, Part 4

Resources for local Native American history and dialects

(The following information is provided by Mary Ellen Lepionka of Gloucester. Download the full PDF document to which this refers. Read: Who Were the Agawam Indians Really? Mary Ellen Lepionka's Sources Sources for Algonquian place names include William Bright’s Native American Place Names of the United States (2004, see especially pp. 32, 41, 554, and… Continue reading Resources for local Native American history and dialects