Water Street

boat-house-water-st

Photo by Arthur Wesley Dow of the boat shop on Water Street, taken from they Turkey Shore side of the river.

Water St. and the Green St. bridge

Water St. and the Green St. bridge

In the book, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, Thomas Franklin Waters recorded the history of Water Street, which is part of an early public right-of-way that extended from the wharf to the Green Street Bridge, then continued along the Sidney Shurcliff Riverwalk to County St.

“Close by the river bank, on either side, a public way was sedulously preserved from any encroachment. On the north side of the river it still remains in Water Street, and originally it seems to have continued near the river, through the present County lands. On the south side it skirted the river, followed Turkey Shore, and continued round the cove to the saw-mill. There were ways to the Labour-in-vain fields, and to the Heartbreak Hill lands, “Old England,” as we call it now.”

water-st-map-1884

The 1884 map of Ipswich shows Water Street as two separate unmarked ways, which were connected at that time by a footpath.

Clam shacks on Water St.

Clam shacks on Water St. Photo by George Dexter, circa 1890. Notice that at that time, Water St. was just a wide dirt path.

water_st_1872

The 1872 Ipswich map shows a section of Water Street missing. Between Summer Street and Hovey Street it was an unimproved dirt path.

Water Street and Summer Street were the town’s first adopted “Ways,” and in the early years were known collectively as “The Way to the Meeting House,” and “The Way to the River.” The two streets host many of the town’s surviving First Period houses. Shown below are historic photos and postcards of the Ipswich River and Water Street, which were the seafaring areas of the village of Ipswich, and are the heart of the East End Historic District, listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Water Street, Ipswich MA

Water Street at the foot of Summer Street.

The Ipswich River, running alongside Water St.

The Ipswich River, running alongside Water St.

Boats at Rest by Arthur Wesley Dow

“Boats at Rest” by Arthur Wesley Dow

Watercolor of the Glazier-Sweet house by Arthur Wesley Dow, who lived across the river.

Watercolor by Arthur Wesley Dow, who lived across the river.

Low tide on Water St.

Sunset by Arthur Wesley Dow

Sunset over town, by Arthur Wesley Dow

Block print by Arthur Wesley Dow of houses on Water Street.

Postcard of the Town Wharf, with Water St. in the background.

Postcard of the Town Wharf, with Water St. in the background on the right and the Green St. Bridge in the distance.

Glover’s Wharf was on Water St. near the Town Wharf.

The intersection of East and Water Streets at the Town Wharf

Water Street 1909, view from the current Ipswich Yacht Club site. In the background is Fall’s Coal Barn, which burned in the 1920’s.. Mr. fall delivered coal door to door with a horse-drawn wagon.

Water Street 1909, view from the current Ipswich Yacht Club site. In the background is Fall’s Coal Barn, which burned in the 1920’s.. Mr. fall delivered coal door to door with a horse-drawn wagon.

dow-water_st_sketch_barton_1200

This photo was shared with us by Bill Barton, from the collection of his grandfather, William J. Barton.

water_st_boats_dow

Clam boats on Water St. with Glover’s Wharf in the background. Photo by Arthur Wesley Dow.

water_st_dexter

Water St.

ellsworth_water_hovey_house

water_st_summer_dexter

View of Summer St. from Turkey Shore by George Dexter.

glazier-sweet_water_st

water_st_staniford_barton_1200

Mid-19th Century photo of Water St. and Clam Shell Alley by John Staniford, from the collection of William J. Barton

clam_boat_water_st

Water St. boats on Ipswich River.

water_DOW_1020_header

 

water_12_dow

Glazier-Sweet house on Water St. Photo by Arthur Wesley Dow.

water_st_clam_shacks_dexter

Clam shacks Water Street, Ipswich

Herman Melanson’s Boatyard on Water Street burned in a spectacular fire on August 7, 2009.The boathouse was constructed by Herman Melanson’s father in 1954 and was also his residence. The entire building, three boats and several vehicles were destroyed. In previous years, Melanson’s boathouse had been an active boat-building facility. Mr. Melanson and his health-care worker managed to escape. This video was posted on Youtube by Donald Freyleue.

The Whipple House on the South Green in Ipswich MA First Period, Georgian and Federal-era houses of Ipswich - There are more remaining first Period houses (1625 through 1725) in Ipswich MA than any other town in the country.
Harris-Sutton house, Water St. 8 Water Street, the Harris-Sutton House (1677) - Abner Harris bought this lot and enlarged the house in 1743. When the house was dismantled and reconstructed in the early 21st Century, evidence was discovered indicating that the eastern part of the house may date to 1677.
57 North Main Street, the Day-Dodge House (1696-1737) - This unusual double house has two entrances and asymmetrical bays. The corner at North Main and East Street is the oldest section and appears to have elements of a barn constructed by Francis Wainwright at this location in 1696. This house is protected by a preservation agreement.
168 Argilla Road, the Tilton-Smith house (c 1720) - Built circa 1720 by Abraham Tilton Jr., a 1998 fire took away much of its original frame, but the owner totally rebuilt the home with with materials salvaged from 18th and 19th century structures throughout New England.
Nathaniel Wade house, County Rd. Ipswich 88 County Road, the Col. Nathaniel Wade House (1727) - This house was built in 1727 by Captain Thomas Wade. On September 25, 1780, his son Nathaniel Wade received an urgent correspondence from General George Washington that General Arnold had "gone to the enemy" and to take command at West Point. The house is protected by a preservation covenant with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
47 Jeffreys Neck Road, the Paine house (1694) - This picturesque house remains on its original saltwater farm location. Three generations of the Paine family made their home here, From 1916, Greenwood Farm was a summer retreat for the Robert G. Dodge family, who used the Paine House as a guesthouse.
Heard-Lakeman house, Poplar St., Ipswich 2 Turkey Shore, the Heard – Lakeman House (1776) - Nathaniel and John Heard bought this land in 1776 and built the present house. Nathaniel sold the house to Richard Lakeman III in 1795. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, and has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
Burnam-Patch House, 1 Turkey Shore 1 Turkey Shore Road, the Burnham-Patch-Day house (1730) - This house has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission. The house was built by Thomas Burnham in 1730 on the foundation of the earlier house he bought in 1667. The large ell on Poplar Street was added in the early nineteenth-century. Abner Day bought the house of the heirs of John Patch in 1814 and kept a well-known tavern.
First Period house, Water St. Ipswich MA 6 Water Street, the Reginald Foster house (1690) - Ipswich deeds list the transfer of a house at this location from Roger Preston to Reginald Foster in 1657, but construction of this house dates to about 1690. Massive chamfered summer beams in the right section, the sharp-pitched roof and purlins provide evidence of the early date.
103 High Street, the William Merchant house (1670) - The building dates to approximately 1670, but the right half may contain timbers from a previous structure on this site which was built in 1639. That simple story and a half cottage is believed to have been built by William Merchant who arrived in Ipswich with John Winthrop and the first settlers. The section on the left was added in 1672.
77 High Street, the John Kimball house (1680) - Richard Kimball owned this lot in 1637. The property passed to John Kimball, and the present house dates from the time of his ownership. It belonged to the Lord family through the 19th century.
19 North Main Street, Thomas Manning house (1799) 19 North Main Street, Thomas Manning house (1799) - This house was built by Dr. Thomas Manning in January, 1799, and remained in the family until 1858, when it became a parsonage. This house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the Ipswich Historical Commission.
39 – 41 High Street, the Daniel Lummus house (1686) - This house has elements dating to 1686 but was significantly rebuilt in 1746. Jonathan Lummus bequeathed to his son Daniel "a small piece of land out of my homestead adjoining to his homestead to make a convenient way to his barn." in 1728.
Perkins-Hodgkins house, East Street in Ipswich 80 East Street, the Perkins – Hodgkins House (c 1700) - The Perkins-Hodgkins house is believed to have been built in 1700 on the foundation of the earlier Jacob Perkins home. The house has been greatly expanded over the years, but the original asymmetrical structure continues to anchor the corner with Jeffreys Neck Road.
Wainwright-Treadwell house, East St., Ipswich MA 62 East Street, the Treadwell-Wainwright House (1691 / 1726) - Capt. John Wainwright bought 3 1/2 acres from Nathaniel Treadwell in 1710 and built part of this fine Georgian mansion, which features elaborate panels and molding, re-used summer beams, and a massive early fireplace.
115 High Street, the Baker – Sutton house (1725) 115 High Street, the Baker – Sutton house (1725) - The widow of Daniel Bosworth, a cowherd sold the lot with a dwelling in 1702 to William Baker, who built the present dwelling. The pilastered chimney and elaborate doorframe were added later.
36 South Main St., the Hall-Haskell House (Ipswich Visitor Center), 1820 - The Ipswich Visitor Center is located in the Hall-Haskell House on South Main Sreet.. Open weekends in May, seven days a week Memorial Day through October.
39 Summer Street Ipswich MA, the Foster Grant house 39 Summer Street, the Foster – Grant house (1717) - In 1717 Nathaniel Knowlton sold a small lot to James Foster who is believed to have built the house. In 1826, the family sold to Ephriam Grant, and the house was long known as the "Grant house." Early Colonial features are preserved throughout the house.
Jewett-Cate house 321 High St. 321 High Street, the Aaron Jewett – Mark Cate house (1780) - Aaron Jewett's daughter, Eliza married Mark Cate of Rowley, and for years it was known as the "Cate house." Sarah Houghton bought it in 1912 and opened a popular tea-room known as "The Rose Tree Inn."
The Isaac Goodale house, built in 1668, was moved to this location at 153 Argilla Road 153 Argilla Road, the Isaac Goodale House (1669) - This First Period house was built in West Peabody before 1695. In 1928 it was reconstructed at 153 Argilla Road by Robert and Susan Goodale.
2 Poplar Street, Swasey Tavern (1718) 2 Poplar Street, Swasey Tavern (1718) - John Ayres built a house in 1693, and sold it in 1705 to John Whipple, who did extensive alterations. In 1725 Increase How purchased the "good mansion house” from Whipple and ran an inn. In 1789 President George Washington addressed the citizenry from these steps. It was owned by General Joseph Swasey in the early 19th Century.
41 Turkey Shore Road, the Howard – Arthur Wesley Dow House (1680) - William Howard purchased this lot from Thomas Emerson in 1679 and built a half-house which was enlarged in 1709. From 1891 to 1906 Arthur Wesley Dow and his wife Minnie ran the Ipswich Summer School of Art in the house.
83 County Road, the Rogers-Brown-Rust House (1665-1723) - The house at 83 County Road is believed to be three houses joined together, at least one from the First Period. In 1836 the house and lot were conveyed to the South Parish as a church site. Asa Brown bought the house and removed it to its present location.
2 North Main Street, the John Appleton house (1707) - This was the first house in Ipswich to have a third story, which was removed by Daniel Noyes around 1768 after he bought the house. In 1962 the Appleton House was purchased by Exxon, which intended to build a gas station on the site. The Ipswich Heritage Trust was formed to save the house, the first major preservation action in Ipswich.
104 High Street, the John Kimball house (1715) - This is is one of three John Kimball houses along High Street, two said to have been built by the father, the third by the son. The 1st period house has a chamfered summer beam and wide plank tongue and groove sheathing. This house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the Ipswich Historical Commission.
26 High Street, the Philip Call house (1659) - This 2-story timber-frame First Period house was built by cordwainer Philip Call about 1659, enlarged around 1725. In 1967, the owners uncovered a chamfered 17th century summer beam and field paneling behind Victorian-era walls. The house has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
7 County Street, the Thomas Dennis House (1663) - Shoreborne Wilson, a cooper, built a house and shop on this site about 1660. Thomas Dennis, the well-known master joiner, bought the property in 1663. The rear ell of the present house dates from that period, The 5-bay front section of the house dates to the 1750's.
58 North Main Street, the Captain Richard Rogers House (1728) - Captain Richard Rogers bought this lot in 1728 and built this high style, gambrel roofed house shortly thereafter. The balustrade, paneling and shell cupboards in this house indicate a high-style Georgian influence, one of the finest of its vintage in New England.
33 High Street, the John and Sarah Dillingham Caldwell house (1660/1709) - In 1654, Cornelius Waldo sold to John Caldwell for £26 the house and land he bought of Richard Betts. Caldwell removed the old house and built the present house with massive summer beams, a huge fireplace, a very substantial house of the 1660’s.
Andrew Burley house, Green St., Ipswich 12 Green Street, the Andrew Burley house (1688) - Andrew Burley bought this lot in 1683 and built a house shortly thereafter. He became a wealthy merchant and updated the house with fine Georgian features. Burley was a justice of the Sessions Court and was elected representative to the General Court in 1741. Capt. John Smith purchased the house in 1760 from the estate of Andrew Burley’s widow Hannah and operated it as Smith's Tavern.
5 South Village Green, the Aaron Smith house (1776) - Aaron Smith married Lucy, the daughter of John and Eunice Baker next door. A metal worker, He produced bayonets for the Revolutionary War. The clocks he produced are highly valued.
Matthew Perkins house, 8 East Street, built in 1709 8 East Street, the Captain Matthew Perkins house (1701) - Winner of the 1991 Mary Conley Award. this well-preserved 1st Period house sits on a former orchard lot that was sold in 1701 by Major Francis Wainwright to Matthew Perkins, a weaver and soldier. In 1719 Perkins opened an inn and tavern in this house, "at the sign of the blue anchor."
The Benjamin Grant house, County Street in Ipswich MA 47 County Street, the Benjamin Grant house (1723) - The Benjamin Grant House was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. It appears to have been originally built as a half house. Benjamin Grant was born in 1701 in Ipswich to Robert and Mary Grant, who emigrated from England. Benjamin married Anne Perkins in 1722, and was killed in the French and Indian War in 1756.
8 Meeting House Green, the David T. Kimball House (1808) 8 Meeting House Green, the David T. Kimball House (1808) - In 1808 the jail site was sold to Reverend David Tenny Kimball; the old jail was removed, and he built the house that is located there now. Rev. Kimball was highly respected for his ministry and a staunch abolitionist.
Dr. John Manning house, North Main Street, Ipswich 36 North Main Street, the Dr. John Manning house (1769) - This house has one of the first preservation agreements in Ipswich, created by the Ipswich Heritage Trust. Dr. Manning was also an inventor and built an unsuccessful wind-driven woolen mill on the site of the present Caldwell Block next to the Choate Bridge. His second mill at the Willowdale Dam was more successful.
1 High Street, the Nathaniel Rogers Old Manse (1727) - The house was constructed for the Rev. Nathaniel Rogers in 1727 by Ipswich cabinet-maker, Capt. Abraham Knowlton. In the early 1900's the building was known as "ye Olde Burnham Inn". This house is protected by a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
12 High Street, the William Russell House (1890) - This is a Queen Anne period house built in 1890, relatively unusual in Ipswich. The sitting room contains a fireplace decorated with sea serpents. According to local tradition, this house had the first inside bathroom in Ipswich.
3 High Street, the John Gaines house (1725) - The John Gaines house at 3 High St. is a 1725 building remodeled in 1806 with Federal trim. The Gaines family in Ipswich are famous for the chairs they produced. The home also served for over one hundred years as the Episcopal rectory.This house has a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
13 High Street, the Joseph Willcomb house (1669-1693) - John Edwards, a tailor, acquired the property in 1668. The earliest section was built by Edwards or his son when he inherited the property in 1693. Edwards was one of several Tithingmen appointed by the Selectmen “to inspect disorderly persons. Joseph Willcomb bought the house prior to 1762.
16 High Street, the Jacob Manning house (1818) 16 High Street, the Jacob Manning house (1818) - Jacob Manning in 1818 built this house at 16 High Street in a small space between the Poor House and the Lord House next door. That former Poor House was later torn down.
6 South Main Street, the Shoreborne Wilson – Samuel Appleton house (1685) 6 South Main Street, the Shoreborne Wilson – Samuel Appleton house (1685) - This house was built by joiner Sherborne Wilson,. The house was purchased in 1702 by Col. Samuel Appleton, the eldest son of Major Samuel Appleton. At the time it was still a two-room central chimney structure, and it is believed that Appleton expanded the building on the southeast side. The house is listed in the National Historic Register of Historic Places.
15 County Street, the Rev. Levi Frisbie house (1788) - This house at 15 County Street was built in 1788 for Rev. Levi Frisbie, pastor of First Church in Ipswich. He continued in the pastorate thirty years until his death in 1806, succeeded by the Rev. David Tenney Kimball.
16 County Street, the Abraham Knowlton house (1726) 16 County Street, the Abraham Knowlton house (1726) - The original house is believed to have been constructed between 1725 and 1740. The house was in poor condition and in 2003 was restored by Ipswich architect Matthew Cummings. It is identical in construction to the Dennis-Dodge house a few doors away.
9 County Street, the Benjamin Dutch house (1705) - This was built early in the 1700’s, and was owned by one of several men named Benjamin Dutch who owned and sold properties throughout town. The asymmetrical facade and timber frame are typical of First Period construction.
10 County Street, the Dennis – Dodge House (1740) - The 1740 Dennis-Dodge house was owned by Captain John Dennis, whose father Thomas Dennis was a renowned woodworker and owned a home across the street. A succession of Dennis family members retained this property. Captain Ignatius Dodge (1816 - 1901) inherited the house. In the early 1800's, Eunice Hale maintained a school in the building.
Candlewood Rd. house, Ipswich MA 59 Candlewood Road, the Jeremiah Kinsman house (1752) - Stephen Kinsman built the house at 59 Candlewood Rd. in 1752. He bequeathed to his son Jeremiah "all my lands in Walker's Swamp with the dwelling house and buildings thereon, recorded Dec.27, 1756, by which time Jeremiah and his wife Sara Harris were living in it. This house is protected by a preservation agreement with the town of Ipswich and the Historical Commission.
Baker Newman house, East St. Ipswich MA 14 East Street, the Baker – Newman house (1725) - John Baker obtained a section of the land extending down East Street to Spring Street, originally granted to Rev. Cobbet. John Baker Jr. sold eight acres with buildings including land on the hillside to Nathaniel Jones Jr. in 1742. Jones sold the house and lot to George Newman Jr., a weaver.
18 East Street, the Baker-Dodge house (1727) - This house was built by John Baker III, and was purchased by Mary Dennis Dodge in 1818. The house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the town of Ipswich.
16 East Street, the Lakeman-Johnson house (c 1840) - This house was built between 1837 and 1846 when mariner Richard Lakeman sold the land “with the dwelling house and other buildings thereon,” to his brother, Captain Ebenezer “Eben” Lakeman. The house has an Asher Benjamin doorway and has a preservation agreement with Historic New England.
37 High Street, Lord – Baker House (1720) - The house is believed to have been built by Robert Lord III in 1720. The property continued in the Lord family until 1775, when Samuel Baker, felt-maker and hatter, purchased it. This early 2nd period house is protected by a preservation agreement between the owners and the Ipswich Historical Commission.
17 High Street, the Thomas Lord house (after 1658) - In 1634 this lot was granted to Robert Lord, one of the settlers of Ipswich, and was deeded to Thomas Lord, a cordwainer who built the early section of this house in 1658. The oak frame encloses a two-room over-two-room house. The saltbox leanto is not integral, indicating that it was added later.
100 High Street, the Joseph Fowler house (1720 – 1756) 100 High Street, the Joseph Fowler house (1720 – 1756) - Joseph Fowler, a carpenter bought the lot in 1720. Records indicate that a house may have existed before Fowler obtained it. The house has a 1-1/2 story, gambrel roof with a central chimney and exposed “gunstock” posts.
45 High Street, the John Lummus house (1712) - Jonathan Lummus, who served in King Philip’s War in 1675 was appointed a tithing man by the town in 1700. Lummus bought Captain Symon Stacy’s land and dwelling on High Street in 1712. This parcel had originally been granted to Thomas Dudley, Governor of Massachusetts. The house underwent a careful restoration by Phillip Ross in 1964.
52 N. Main Street, the Treadwell – Hale house (1799) - This building is believed to have been built after the land was sold to Nathaniel Treadwell 3rd in 1799. He transferred to Joseph Hale one month later. There is a stone cooking hearth in the basement of the house, which is protected by a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
40 North Main Street, the Captain Brewer house (1825) - 40 North Main Street, the Captain Brewer house (1825) - Captain John Brewer bought two small parcels on North Main St. in 1824 and on them built the present house as a general store.
52 High Street, the Henry Kingsbury – Robert Lord house (1660) 52-54 High Street, the Henry Kingsbury – Robert Lord house (1660) - Henry Kingsbury, the earliest known owner of this lot, is first mentioned in Ipswich Records of 1638. The oldest elements of the present house date to 1660, the year Henry Kingsbury sold a house and lot to Robert Lord. Key features of this house include a hidden room and 10 fireplaces.
51 Linebrook Road, the Hart House (1678) - The oldest parts of the Hart House were apparently constructed in 1678-80 by Samuel Hart, the son of Thomas Hart, an Irish tanner who arrived in Ipswich in 1637. The two oldest rooms are exact duplicates of the originals, which were moved to museums in the early 20th Century.
106 High St. the Caleb Kimball house (1715) - Caleb Kimball (1) was born in 1639 in Ipswich, the son of Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott. The owner has maintained the left inside as a First Period home, with exposed beams and a large fireplace. The right inside was updated with Georgian features, plaster ceilings and a Rumford fireplace.
Samuel Dutch house, S.Main St., Ipswich MA 69 S. Main Street, the Samuel Dutch house (b 1733) - Samuel Dutch bought this land in 1723 and built this house by 1733. The front appears to have been enlarged with a third floor and a hip roof during in the early 19th Century. The rear wing has a chamfered summer beam, suggesting that it was an older house.
7 South Village Green, the Rev. John Rogers – Col. John Baker House (c 1700, expanded in 1761) - Daniel Rogers sold his homestead to John Baker in 1761 and Baker built this house, which has much original material, including Georgian paneling and original fireplaces. This house is protected by a preservation agreement with the Ipswich Historical Commission.
3 Summer Street, the Benjamin Kimball house (c 1720, alt. 1803) - This house dates to about 1720 and was a single-floor 2 room cape moved to this location in 1803. The first floor outside corners have gunstock posts, evidence that they once supported the roof.
43 Argilla Road, the Giddings – Burnham house (b 1667) - The earliest section of the Giddings-Burnham House at 43 Argilla Road in Ipswich was built in the mid-17th Century by carpenter George Giddings who immigrated from Norfolk, England. The earliest documentation for this property was the deed of sale between George Giddings and his brother-in-law Thomas Burnham in 1667.
Samuel Kinsman house, 53 Argilla Rd., Ipswich 53 Argilla Road, the Samuel Kinsman house (1750-77) - Samuel Kinsman received this property in a bequest from his father Capt. John Kinsman, who married Hannah Burnham in 1733. The house is generally dated circa 1750 with a 1777 wing from an existing structure that was moved.
Boardman house, Turkey Shore Ipswich, 1725 67 Turkey Shore Road, the Stephen Boardman house (1720) - This house is named for Stephen Boardman, the son of Thomas Boardman and Sarah Langley. He and his wife Elizabeth Cogswell moved to Stratham, NH where he made a name for himself as a vocal supporter of the American revolution.The wide pine board floors in the house are original, and 4 restored fireplaces share a central chimney.
White Horse Inn, Ipswich MA 34 High Street, the White Horse Inn (1659 / 1763) - John Andrews, innkeeper sold this lot with a house in 1659. The First Period structure was greatly altered and expanded after its purchase by Jeremiah Lord in 1763, and took its present appearance around 1800. It stayed in the Lord family into the 20th Century.
Merryfield house, Woods Lane, Ipswich 11 Woods Lane, the Merrifield house (1792) - The oldest part of the large house at 11 Woods Lane was built in 1792 by Francis Merrifield, Jr. who served as a lieutenant in Capt. Nathaniel Wade’s Co. during the Revolutionary War. The Merrifield House, also known as Rosebank, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and is a past recipient of the Mary P. Conley award.
41 Linebrook Road, Old Cross Farm (c 1717) 41 Linebrook Road, Old Cross Farm (c 1717) - Originally a smaller house, constructed by John Denison the elder, it came into the possession of of Nathaniel Cross in 1761 and became a 25 -acre working farm. Several generations of the Cross family lived in this house, operating a weaver’s shop, fruit farm and poultry operation.
3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665) 3 Hovey Street, the John Kendrick house (1665) - John Kenrick, a cooper by trade, owned this lot in 1665,. He and his son sold it to to Thomas Staniford in 1706. Structural evidence supports a construction date of about 1670. Much of the trim dates from the late 18th or early 19th centuries.
43 Summer Street, the Wilcomb-Pinder house (1718) - This timber-framed First Period house was built in 1718 by William Wilcomb. The interior of the home features hand-hewn summer beams, wide plank flooring and the original fireplaces. The next owner, William Benjamin Pinder was a corporal with Col. Appleton’s company during the French and Indian War.
72 County Rd., Ipswich MA 72 County Road, the David Giddings house (1828) - The site of the David Giddings house was bequeathed by Jonathan Wade to his grandson Nathaniel in 1749. In 1828 Wade sold the lot and the shop standing on it to David Giddings, who enlarged it to a two-story dwelling facing the Green.
Glazier-Sweet house, 12 Water St. 12 Water Street, the Glazier – Sweet house (1728) - This house was built in 1728 by Benjamin Glazier, a sea captain, and transitions the First and Second Periods of Colonial construction. The original half house and early Beverly Jog addition remain intact, with later additions.
Engraving of Market Square in Ipswich from John Warner Barber’s Historical collections: being a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, etc. relating to the history and antiquities of every town in Massachusetts,” published in 1839 Meeting House Green Historic District - The North Green was once the religious, governmental and commercial center of Ipswich, and where the town's most successful businessmen built fine Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, Italianate and Victorian homes.
Ipswich Mills Historic District - Six parallel streets, 1st Street to 6th Street plus Estes and Kimball Streets were laid out by the Ipswich Mills Company to provide housing for their workers, many of whom were Polish. Most of the houses were purchased by residents when the mill closed in 1928.
South Green Historic District - The South Green dates from 1686, when the town voted that the area be held in common, and became known as the School House Green. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
296 High Street, the Oliver Bailey house (1831) 296 High Street, the Oliver Bailey house (1831) - Oliver Bailey, a shoe maker who also operated a small farm at this house he built in 1860. He married Judith Howe of Rowley, and their son Eban Howe Bailey lived to be 100 years old, well-known for his popular spiritual musical compositions.
High Street Historic District - High Street was on the "Old Bay Road" and has the largest concentration of “First Period” houses in America The Old Burying Ground is on High Street near Lords Square.
76 County Road, the Asa Wade house (1831) - This building is similar to the house next door, which was built by Samuel Wade, who may have built both houses. Asa Wade is buried in the Old South Cemetery across the street.
Samuel Wade House, 78 County Rd. Ipswich 78 County Road, the Samuel Wade house (1831) - In 1831, Samuel Wade purchased a lot and built this house as his home. In the early-mid Twentieth Century, the Samuel Wade house became the Southside Nursing Home, with 20 rooms & 13 bathrooms. It was restored as a private residence by the Marchand family, who made it their home in the 1960’s and 70’s.
82 County Rd., Ipswich Ma 82 County Road, the Brown – Manning house (1835) - The widow Judith Manning and single woman Mary Brown had the house at 82 County Rd. built for them in 1835. It remained in the family until the late 19th century.
Appleton Farms - Owned by the Trustees of Reservations, Appleton Farms is America’s oldest working farm, with 12 miles of walking trails, a visitor center, and Community Supported Agriculture program.
52 Jeffreys Neck Rd. Ipswich Ross Tavern 52 Jeffreys Neck Road, Ross Tavern – Lord Collins house (c 1690) - The house was moved from South Main Street in 1940 by David Wendel and restored to a high-style First Period appearance on the basis of observed physical evidence. The Collins-Lord house on High Street was moved and attached to the rear of this house.
49 Candlewood Road, the Robert Kinsman house (b 1714) - Robert Kinsman constructed this First Period house before 1714, and the home has been greatly expanded over the years. Stephen Kinsman inherited the house in 1726, and with his wife Elizabeth Russell brought up a family of twelve children. They dwelt in the old Robert Kinsman homestead until 1767 when he sold his farm, 47 acres and buildings to Samuel Patch.
41 Candlewood Road, the Boardman house (c 1730) - Bryan Townsend completely restored this second-period 1750 home built by Captain John Boardman or his son Thomas. The barn that Townsend restored received the 2009 Mary Conley award for historic preservation of an Ipswich property.
21 High Street, the Haskell – Lord house (c 1750) - 21 High Street, the Haskell – Lord house (c 1750) - This fine house was built circa 1750 by Mark Haskell, an Ipswich cabinet-maker. Haskell served as a Light House Volunteer during the Revolutionary War. Daniel Lord married Eunice, the daughter of Mark Haskell, and Haskell conveyed to him the house and an acre of land in 1767, which is the first registered deed.
391 Linebrook Road, Linebrook Parish Church (1848) - Linebrook Parish was incorporated in 1746 by an act of the Massachusetts Legislature. The first sanctuary was located nearby on Leslie Road. It was dismantled and re-erected on this site in 1828. The building was taken down and the present church was built 20 years later.
Harris house, Water St., Ipswich MA 28 Water Street, the Harris – Stanwood House (1696) - The Harris – Stanwood house was built in 1696 by John Harris. John Stanwood acquired the property in 1809 and it remained in his family for many years. The right wing was added c. 1884.
57 High Street, the Stone – Rust – Abraham Lummus house (c 1750) 57 High Street, the Stone – Rust – Abraham Lummus house (c 1750) - This cape saltbox was built by Robert Stone and has many original features, including vertical feather edge sheathing. William Rust bought the house in 1851 and his heirs occupied the estate into the 20th century. The separate workshop/barn on the northwest corner is believed to be a former  cobbler shop, once connected to the house.
44 High Street, the Francis Goodhue house (circa 1800) 44 High Street, the Francis Goodhue house (circa 1800) - This house displays refined Federal-era features indicating the late 18th or early 19th Century for its construction. The barn and the lower level of this house may be half a century older.
15 Summer Street, the Jonathan Pulcifer house (1718) - Jonathan Pulcifer built this house in 1718 on Summer Street, one of the "oldest ways" in Ipswich. He was a descendant of Benjamin Pulsipher, an early settler of Ipswich who died in 1695.
403 Linebrook Road, the Timothy Morse house (1817) - Timothy Morse Jr. (b. 1783) was a fine carpenter by trade and the house retains much of his finish work. Antique wide pine floors and period detail have been maintained.
114 Topsfield Road, the Goodhue – Adams house (1763) - The home at 114 Topsfield Road is known as the Goodhue-Adams-Patch house. The Goodhue and Adams families were among the original settlers in Ipswich. The house is believed to have been built in 1763.
232 Argilla Road, the Patch-Brown-Crockett house (c 1760-85) - John Patch died in 1799 leaving the Sagamore Hill farm to his grandson Tristram Brown, who built the dwelling, which he operated as a boarding house on the way to the beach. Dr. Eugene A. Crockett bought the property along with its dairy and hay farm in November 1897.
Argilla Farm 107 Argilla Road, Argilla Farm (1785) - In 1637, John Winthrop Jr. conveyed his farm to Samuel Symonds, who became Deputy-Governor of the Colony. It came into possession of Thomas Baker, who married one of Symonds' daughters. Allen Baker built the hip-roofed farm house in 1785. It was purchased by Ephraim Brown and inherited by his son Thomas.
18 Hammatt Street, the Ipswich gas generator building (1877-2018) - The Ipswich Gas & Light Company was formed in 1877 and manufactured gas from coal. Pipes were installed throughout town and gas street lights erected. This building was Brown's coal gas plant, and was demolished in March 2018.
Books and documents - Links to over 300 online publications about Ipswich and the North Shore area, including "Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony" by Thomas Franklin Waters, “Publications of the Ipswich Historical Society”, and “Historical Collections of the Essex Institute.”
14 Candlewood Road, the Joseph Brown and Elizabeth Perkins house (1779) - Elizabeth Brown, descendant of the early Candlewood settler John Brown, was the wife of Captain Perkins, and gained possession of this lot. In December, 1779, their daughter, Elizabeth, became the wife of Joseph Brown, of the same family line, who built this house.
65 Candlewood Road, the Rhoda Kinsman house ( 1776 / 1818) - Jeremiah Kinsman died in 1818, and his will bequeathed the “Walker’s Island farm” to his sons Jeremiah and William in equal parts. William or his son William Jr. built this house next door, which was known as the “cottage." It came to be occupied by Rhoda Kinsman, daughter of William Jr.
50 Argilla Road, the Burnham-Andrews house (1815) - The Burnham farm at one time stretched both sides of Argilla Road. This house was probably moved a short distance to this location by J. Howard Burnham in the late 18th or early 19th Century.
Burnham-Brown house, 86 County Rd., Ipswich MA 86 County Road, the Burnham – Brown house (1775) - This house was built in 1775 on a lot on Candlewood Rd., probably by Thomas Burnham. In 1821 Nathan Brown bought the house from Oliver Appleton, and 3 years later he removed it to its present site on County Rd. Brown and others enlarged and remodeled the old Burnham House, but some 18th century features remain.
36 Water St. Ipswich MA the York-Averill house 36 Water Street, the York – Averill House (1715) - Captain Samuel York built this house in 1715 after selling two smaller lots on East Street. The earliest portions of this house date from the early years of his ownership, Benjamin Averill, a Revolutionary War veteran, bought the house in 1793 and it remained in the Averill family until the late 19th century.

More photos and additional information:

Along the Ipswich River: Historic photos of the Ipswich River from original glass negatives taken by early Ipswich photographers Arthur Wesley Dow, George Dexter and Edward L. Darling.

The Ipswich River: The 35-mile Ipswich River flows into the Atlantic Ocean at Ipswich Bay. The Ipswich River Water Association works to protect the river and its watershed. Foote Brothers Canoes on Topsfield Rd provides rentals and shuttle service from April to October.

The Industrial History of the Ipswich River: The Industrial History of the Ipswich River was produced for the Ipswich 375th Anniversary by John Stump, volunteer for the Ipswich Museum, and Alan Pearsall, who produced the Ipswich Mural with funding from EBSCO.

The Choate Bridge: The American Society of Civil Engineers cites the Choate Bridge in Ipswich as the oldest documented two-span masonry arch bridge in the U.S., and the oldest extant bridge in Massachusetts.

The Old Town Landings and Wharfs: Many a pleasant sail down the river are in the memories of William J. Barton. “These were the names of the places and flats along the Ipswich River before my time, and familiar to me during my time. They were used by the fishermen and clammers. I know. I was one of them. It was the happiest time of my life.”

When Herring Were Caught by Torchlight: In the late 19th Century, most of the men around the river would look forward to “herringing” when fall arrived. The foot of Summer Street was the best landing. One year so many herring were caught, they were dumped in the Parker River, and Herring did not return for many years.

County Street, Sawmill Point, and bare hills: The town voted in 1861 to build County Street and its stone arch bridge, connecting Cross and Mill Streets. A Woolen mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop and veneer mill operated near the bridge.

The Town Wharf: The Ipswich Town Landing is one of several locations along the River where wharves were located over the centuries.

Diamond Stage: In 1673, two fishermen from the Isles of Shoals, Andrew Diamond and Harry Maine, arrived together in Ipswich. Mr. Diamond built a platform for salting and shipping fish, and became quite successful. The location is still known today as Diamond Stage.

Visit the Ipswich River Watershed Association site