Ipswich, Massachusetts was founded in 1634 in an area the Native Americans called “Agawam,” The historic neighborhoods of Meeting House GreenHigh Street, the East End, and the South Green offer well-preserved streetscapes of 17th to 19th-century residences. Resistance by the citizens of Ipswich to a tax imposed by the Crown in 1687 is commemorated in the town’s seal, which bears the motto, “The Birthplace of American Independence 1687.”

First Period Howard House, Turkey Shore, Ipswich MA Ipswich First Period houses (before 1725) - The First Period of colonial American architecture was approximately 1626 through 1725. There are more remaining first Period houses in Ipswich than anywhere else in the country.
Settlers and early inhabitants of Ipswich - The Puritan settlers of Ipswich arrived during the “Great Migration. Sources include "Early Inhabitants of Ipswich" by Abraham Hammatt, "Vital Records to 1850," and "Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony" by Thomas Franklin Waters.
Photos of Ipswich - Photos of Ipswich from our readers, and historic photos from original glass plate negatives.
Old North Burying Ground - Established in 1634, the Old North Burying Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts is one of the oldest cemeteries in North America.
Trails on the Massachusetts North Shore Ipswich Trails - Maps and information for dozens of hiking trails in Ipswich and the surrounding area.
Historic Districts - The contiguous historic neighborhoods of Meeting House Green, High Street, the East End, and the South Green are well-preserved streetscapes of 17th to 19th century private residences.
17th Century houses in Ipswich, Massachusetts - Ipswich is believed to have 59 houses with elements of "First Period" English construction, of which approximately 3 dozen date to the 17th Century. View also 18th and 19th Century Ipswich houses.
Ipswich Riverwalk Mural The Ipswich Riverwalk mural - In 2005 EBSCO Publishing commissioned artist Alan Pearsall to paint a 2,700-square-foot mural on one of the old mill buildings occupied by the company in Ipswich. The mural is the centerpiece of the town's Riverwalk.
Drunk Puritans in Plymouth Colony Drunkards, liars, a hog, a dog, a witch, “disorderly persons” and the innkeeper - As the young boys who arrived with the first settlers of Ipswich approached adulthood, they developed a fondness for hard liquor and rowdiness, which frequently landed them in court.