Woodcut of historic Ipswich Town Hill

Ipswich, Massachusetts was founded in 1634 in an area the Native Americans called “Agawam,” The historic neighborhoods of Meeting House GreenHigh Street, the East End, and the South Green offer well-preserved streetscapes of 17th to 19th-century residences. Resistance by the citizens of Ipswich to a tax imposed by the Crown in 1687 is commemorated in the town’s seal, which bears the motto, “The Birthplace of American Independence 1687.”

Postcard of High Street in Ipswich Historical Commission issues statement on over-development in historic neighborhoods - The Ipswich Historical Commission, with the full authority of Section 8D of the Laws of Massachusetts opposes the identified projects at 87 High Street and 108 Central Street in their proposed density and recommends other town boards to do the same.  
The Ipswich River circa 1900 The Ipswich River - The 35-mile Ipswich River flows into the Atlantic Ocean at Ipswich Bay. The Ipswich River Water Association works to protect the river and its watershed. Foote Brothers Canoes on Topsfield Rd provides rentals and shuttle service from April to October.
The East End Historic District - The East End includes the seafaring portion of the original village of Ipswich and offers an architectural history of the town’s development.
1893 Birdseye map of Ipswich The Central Street Victorian neighborhood - Central Street was laid out in 1870, Manning High School opened 4 years later, and stores began to be constructed. By 1884, the Victorian neighborhood that lines Central, Hammatt, Manning, Mineral, Liberty, Brown and Maple Streets had been created. The historic neighborhood is threatened by over-development.
Preservation Agreements - Since 1969 the Ipswich Historical Commission has been responsible for a voluntary program of binding Preservation Agreements between the Commission and over 40 homeowners to preserve the structure's architecturally significant features.
Benjamin Dutch house, County St. Plaques for historic houses - Homeowners may order a plaque after visiting the Historic Houses of Ipswich page to confirm the date of construction and the individual for whom the house is named.
Old North Burying Ground - Established in 1634, the Old North Burying Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts is one of the oldest cemeteries in North America.
Native Americans of the North shore - The Puritan settlers of Ipswich established the town in 1634 in an area the Native American inhabitants called "Agawam."
Engraving of Market Square in Ipswich from John Warner Barber’s Historical collections: being a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, etc. relating to the history and antiquities of every town in Massachusetts,” published in 1839 Meeting House Green Historic District - The North Green was once the religious, governmental and commercial center of Ipswich, and where the town's most successful businessmen built fine Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, Italianate and Victorian homes.
Trails on the Massachusetts North Shore Ipswich Trails - Maps and information for dozens of hiking trails in Ipswich and the surrounding area.
Ipswich History - Ipswich, Massachusetts was settled in 1633 in an area the Native Americans called "Agawam." This page features posts on this site in chronological order of the events.
First Period Howard House, Turkey Shore, Ipswich MA Ipswich First Period houses (before 1725) - The First Period of colonial American architecture was approximately 1626 through 1725. There are more remaining first Period houses in Ipswich than anywhere else in the country.
High Street Historic District - High Street was on the "Old Bay Road" and has the largest concentration of “First Period” houses in America The Old Burying Ground is on High Street near Lords Square.